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Proceedings of the IEEE

Issue 6 • Date June 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE publication information

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 909 - 910
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Energy Efficiency of the PC

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 911 - 912
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Issue on Educational Technology

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 913 - 916
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Distance Education: New Technologies and New Directions

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 917 - 930
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1098 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Distance education has been undergoing incremental change over the past decade or so since the advent of the commercial Internet and the World Wide Web. However, we are currently on the cusp of advances that will facilitate experiential learning at a distance, reduce the cost of distance education production, expand access to education, and closely integrate formal education into the fabric of everyday life. Following a review of distance education technology past and present, this paper presents the evolving technologies that will facilitate the most important advances in the field and reviews their early applications. View full abstract»

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  • The iLab Shared Architecture: A Web Services Infrastructure to Build Communities of Internet Accessible Laboratories

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 931 - 950
    Cited by:  Papers (115)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1508 KB)  

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's iLab project has developed a distributed software toolkit and middleware service infrastructure to support Internet-accessible laboratories and promote their sharing among schools and universities on a worldwide scale. The project starts with the assumption that the faculty teaching with online labs and the faculty or academic departments that provide those labs are acting in two roles with different goals and concerns. The iLab architecture focuses on fast platform-independent lab development, scalable access for students, and efficient management for lab providers while preserving the autonomy of the faculty actually teaching the students. Over the past two years, the iLab architecture has been adopted by an increasing number of partner universities in Europe, Australia, Africa, Asia, and the United States. The iLab project has demonstrated that online laboratory use can scale to thousands of students dispersed on several continents. View full abstract»

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  • Technology and Tools to Enhance Distributed Engineering Education

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 951 - 969
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1611 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    While the ongoing information technology (IT) revolution is providing us with tremendous educational opportunities, educators and IT researchers face numerous obstacles and pedagogical questions. The Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) has a long history in engineering education research and has developed and designed many different tools for instructor authoring, course capturing, indexing, and retrieval. Special attention has been applied to the design and deployment of distributed learning environments. This paper describes the environment and challenges facing Georgia Tech as it expands its campus worldwide while maintaining integration of faculty and students across these campuses. The focus is primarily on the problems of synchronous delivery to multiple sites with a description of how technology is currently being deployed in Georgia Tech's distance-learning (DL) classrooms, as well as technology that is under development for the DL classroom of the future. View full abstract»

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  • Semantic Knowledge Management for Education

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 970 - 989
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (809 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ldquoSemantic technologiesrdquo are touted as the next big wave in educational technology and as the solution to many problems in this arena. Interdisciplinary work between the fields of knowledge management (KM) and educational technology (ET) is booming. But the crop of actual systems and semantically enhanced learning objects is still meager, maybe because KM and EL are lacking a consensus on the underlying notions, e.g., of ldquosemantics,rdquo yielding specific problems in their interplay. In this paper, we look at semantic educational technologies and draw conclusions for their approach in KM. In particular, we (re)evaluate the notions of semantics, knowledge, and learning; their role for learning materials in ET; and how they interact with the contexts involved in the learning/teaching process. Based on this, we distill a list of conditions the underlying knowledge representation format must fulfil to support these. As these conditions are still rather abstract, we show how they can be realized in a concrete language design, taking in our open mathematical documents format OMDoc as a point of departure. View full abstract»

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  • From WebEx to NavEx: Interactive Access to Annotated Program Examples

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 990 - 999
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1826 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper reviews our work on providing students interactive access to annotated program examples. We review our experience with WebEx, the system that allows students to explore examples line by line. After that we present NavEx, an adaptive environment for accessing interactive programming examples. NavEx enhances WebEx with a specific kind of adaptive navigation support known as adaptive annotation. The classroom study of NavEx discovered that adaptive navigation support can visibly increase student motivation to work with nonmandatory educational content. NavEx boosted the overall amount of work done and the average length of a session. In addition, various features of NavEx were highly regarded by the students. View full abstract»

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  • Peer Review Anew: Three Principles and a Case Study in Postpublication Quality Assurance

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1000 - 1011
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (815 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Over the last 15 years, the Internet has enabled new modes of authorship, new forms of open licensing and distribution, and new forms of collaboration and peer production to flourish. But in turn, new anxieties have arisen, especially concerning quality assurance, peer review, reuse, and modification. New innovations are appearing in peer review, endorsement, the measurement of trust, and the understanding of reputation, but without any systematic analysis of the general principles of quality assurance and peer review in this new era. In this paper, we propose a general set of principles for understanding what peer review was in the past and how it should be applied today to different kinds of content and in new platforms for managing quality. The principles stress an analysis not only on the content in materials but also on their context of use. Our focus is on open educational resources, and we present a case study of the open education project Connexions' lens system for quality assurance and review. However, the principles can be applied across multiple levels of knowledge production, including scholarship in engineering and science and reference materials in addition to educational publishing. View full abstract»

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  • MIT's Strategy for Educational Technology Innovation, 1999–2003

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1012 - 1034
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (683 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper discusses the institutional framework and the strategic decisions the led the launch of several major educational technology initiatives at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) between 1999 and 2003. It describes how MIT's central administration provided strategic support and coordination for large educational technology programs and traces how strategies evolved as work progressed through 2003 to a point where major projects had been launched and were ready to proceed as ongoing concerns. The history recounted here provides a snapshot of a world-class university's confronting the changing environment for higher education engendered by information technology at beginning of the twenty-first century. View full abstract»

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  • Designing Pre-College Engineering Curricula and Technology: Lessons Learned From the Infinity Project

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1035 - 1048
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (875 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The importance of mathematics and science education in today's modern, technology-driven society cannot be understated. This paper describes the history of and ongoing efforts in curricular and educational technology development for the infinity project, a joint effort between educators, administrators, and industry leaders to establish an engineering curriculum at the high school level. Several issues are considered, including the choice and design of the technology platform used in the curriculum, the curricular and technology development timeline, and the design examples chosen to illuminate important engineering concepts within the curriculum. We also provide a list of key best practices and challenges in developing novel pre-college engineering curricula for future engineers. View full abstract»

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  • Knowledge Community: A Knowledge-Building System for Global Collaborative Project Learning

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1049 - 1061
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2722 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The wave of a knowledge economy drives today's education to equip students with knowledge building abilities. While collaborative learning has been proven to be an effective constructivist pedagogy, it is difficult to elicit, coordinate, and capture the corresponding knowledge construction process. The situation becomes more challenging when learning is conducted in a distributed environment in which the participants are scattered in different geographical locations. In this paper, we depict the theories, architecture, applications, and analysis of a Web-based computer-supported collaborative learning and knowledge-building system called Knowledge Community (KC), which currently serves a series of 3I (interdisciplinary, interschool, and international) Project Learning activities with more than 10 000 students and teachers participating globally. We also describe the corresponding 3I Project Learning model, a novel technology-enabled pedagogy in which learners perform collaborative, comparative study projects with peers from other countries. Technologically, KC is the use of Web technologies to provide a collaborative learning environment. Pedagogically, KC with its embedded learning theories has created a new learning culture that meets the demands of knowledge economy. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical Engineering Hall of Fame: Gano Dunn

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1062 - 1064
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (747 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Future Special Issues/Special Sections of the Proceedings

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1065 - 1066
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (183 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Proceedings of the IEEE information for authors

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1067 - 1068
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (34 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Put your technology leadership in writing

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (398 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): C4
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The most highly-cited general interest journal in electrical engineering and computer science, the Proceedings is the best way to stay informed on an exemplary range of topics.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
H. Joel Trussell
North Carolina State University