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Engineering Management Journal

Issue 6 • Date Dec. 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Conversation as communication

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):265 - 270
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (422 KB)

    You need to communicate to co-ordinate your own work and that of others. Without explicit effort, your conversation will lack communication and so your work too will collapse through misunderstanding and error. The key is to treat a conversation as you would any other managed activity: by establishing an aim, planning what to do, and checking afterwards that you have achieved that aim. Only in thi... View full abstract»

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  • Faith, hope or charity? How do you see your investment in training?

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):275 - 278
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (286 KB)

    Training is a key investment in business but companies must take responsibility for it in order to develop the workforce. The author aims to help managers to realise that each of them has a responsibility, and one which will not be shouldered until there are some fundamental changes in attitude. These changes are long overdue and are perhaps at the root of the difficulties in industry at the prese... View full abstract»

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  • Linking the use of resources to project progress

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):279 - 282
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (232 KB)

    Every project manager aims at completing his project within the time and cost estimates. Progress is monitored by checking when major nodes are achieved. A useful way of displaying lack of progress is the milestone slip chart. This can help the manager to link use of resources to project progress.<> View full abstract»

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  • Management and research: the uneasy compromise

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):283 - 293
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (831 KB)

    Management begins with the identification of objectives, goes on to the prioritisation of aims among these objectives and then proceeds with the allocation of resources. The author shows how the Advisory Board for the Research Councils (ABRC) and the Research Councils, in association with universities and polytechnics try not to constrain scientists so they can still display spontaneity and origin... View full abstract»

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  • Models of management development: functional and competency

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):294 - 296
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB)

    The author addresses the issue of management development by examining two distinct models: the functional model and the competency model. He reviews both, looking at the positive and negative aspects of each model following a renewed interest in management training and development with the advent of the Management Charter Initiative (MCI) to provide industry and commerce with 'chartered managers'.... View full abstract»

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  • Surviving a computer disaster

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):271 - 274
    IEEE is not the copyright holder of this material | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (236 KB)

    Most organisations are so reliant on their computing service that loss of real-time systems could have devastating effects. The first step to improving this situation is to identify what risks exist and how significant they are within the specific environment of the organisation. Disaster recovery plans can then by formulated in order to restore permanent computing service View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Engineering Management magazine covers management methods, techniques and processes relevant to engineers, incorporating project management, marketing, finance, law, quality and responsibilities of the engineer in society.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Dickon Ross
IET