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Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date May 1978

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Industry Applications Society

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Goal of California Solar Pilot Plant: Prove Technical Viability and Obtain Actual Costs

    Page(s): 189 - 192
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Start-Up Torques in Synchronous Motor Drives

    Page(s): 193 - 198
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    During run-up as an induction motor, the torque produced by a synchronous machine has oscillating components in addition to the natural frequencies of torsional oscillation of the complete drive system so that the shaft torque may differ substantially from the motor electromagnetic torque. The latter can be divided into four components: 1) a unidirectional or accelerating component, 2) an oscillating component due to magnetic saliency and nonuniform rotor windings, 3) oscillating components due to higher harmonics of air gap permeance and winding magnetomotive force, and 4) components caused by switching the supply. In addition, slot effects and magnetic saturation may also lead to oscillating torque components. The factors affecting the magnitude and frequency of these components are discussed and related to recordings of actual shaft torque. View full abstract»

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  • Large Motors on Limited Capacity Transmission Lines

    Page(s): 198 - 208
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    This paper defines some utility restrictions and limitations for the application of large motors and their systems, describes theory and solutions to starting inrush and voltage flicker, specifically analyzes several starting methods and their effects on the system, and reviews some economic considerations. View full abstract»

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  • Capacitor Starting of Large Motors

    Page(s): 209 - 212
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    The basic requirements of a capacitor starting system for use in reducing voltage flicker during start-up of large induction motors are presented. Flicker calculations, control circuits, switching requirements, overstressing, and flicker reduction are discussed along with test results from several installations on the Houston Lighting and Power Company system. View full abstract»

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  • Power and Current Pulsations of an Induction Motor Connected to a Reciprocating Compressor

    Page(s): 213 - 219
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    The influence of a periodic pulsating torque variation on a polyphase induction motor is described. A calculation method is outlined to predict the current, power, and torque pulsation along with the effect on power factor, slip, and efficiency. The calculation method is compared with tests and a digital solution of the differential motor equations. View full abstract»

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  • Motor Surface Temperatures in Hazardous Areas

    Page(s): 220 - 222
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    The temperature of motor surfaces is still a major concern of those operating equipment in hazardous (classified) areas. This surface temperature must be below the ignition temperature of the atmosphere under all possible operating conditions for Division 1 environments. Currently a 2150C maximum surface temperature is a must for a motor that can be operated in any Class I, Group D, Division 1 area without qualification. These lower temperatures are also causing a renewed interest in motor performance in Division 2 areas. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of Winding Failures in Three-Phase Squirrel Cage Induction Motors

    Page(s): 223 - 226
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    Every motor user is faced with the fact that someday his motor will fail. Due to the destructive nature of most failures, it is not easy to determine the cause. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a procedure for analyzing these failures and determining the cause so that further steps can be taken to eliminate them. View full abstract»

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  • An Electromechanical Network Model of the DC Motor

    Page(s): 227 - 233
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    A dc motor is modeled by means of a network representation of an analogous mechanical system consisting of a velocity source, rotational damper, and rotational spring which derive from the no-load speed, armature resistance, and armature inductance, respectively. It is shown that the reduction in the field due to the cross-magnetization effect of the armature current can be approximated by an additional damper and a controlled torque source. A Thevenin equivalent of the resulting electromechanical network is obtained and applied to common situations. Steady-state applications in which loads are characterized by any combination of coulomb and viscous friction can be solved directly with ease. It is also shown that the response to small changes in armature voltage, field voltage, or both can be obtained directly. Dynamic characteristics are considered by deriving system functions from the equilibrium equations which can be written directly from the network representation of the complete electromechanical system. View full abstract»

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  • Industrial Turbine Energy Supply Systems - An Economic Way to Save Energy

    Page(s): 234 - 241
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    Turbines, integrated into the process plant's need for both process heat and power, can generate power (kW and/or hp) with less than half the fuel required by a separate plant generating and transmitting electric power to the industrial. In those processes where there is a source of waste heat, there may be potential for economic conversion of this heat into turbine power. Typical examples will show the parameters that influence the selection of turbine energy supply alternatives. These systems, with the operating flexibility needed to match the process plants varying requirements for kilowatts, horsepower, and process heat, can provide reliable and economic power. View full abstract»

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  • Energy-Saving Lighting for Industrial Applications

    Page(s): 242 - 246
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    Since the onset of energy crunch, turning off lights has become the symbol of energy savings. The results are far from being satisfactory, in some cases, even counter productive. The most important contribution which a lighting engineer can make as far as energy saving is concerned will be to apply his technical know-how to provide adequate but economic lighting, especially in the industrial plants where lighting is directly related to productivity and the quality of work life. High-efficacy light sources should provide an excellent opportunity to energy saving lighting in the industrial plants. Many shortcomings of these light sources in the past have been either overcome or improved to such a point that no major problems would be encountered in their application. Metal halide and high-pressure sodium have made the longest stride in the recent years. We can expect this trend to continue and grow. The latest available energy saving light sources and their applications in the field of industrial lighting are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Theoretical Principles on the Restricted Breathing Properties or Materials in Potentially Explosive Environments and Their Utilization

    Page(s): 247 - 254
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    Electrical restricted breathing material is material which can be used for practice in explosion-endangered areas under certain conditions. It can be used in cases where the occurrence of explosive gas-air or vapor-air mixtures is safely limited to a short time. In such cases with a time-limited danger of explosion, the demand for using completely explosion-proof material is not always economically tenable. Here the use of restricted breathing material, which safely prevents the penetration of the explosive mixture to those positions which might cause ignition, is more economical. The safety depends above all upon the imperviousness to the penetration of gases and vapors. The foundations, preconditions, theory, and testing methods for restricted breathing material are discussed. The restricted breathing factor S is discussed as characteristic size, and its dependence upon the low explosion limit, the diffusion constant, and the boiling temperature of the explosive mixture is pointed out. At the same time, it is shown how the suitability of the material can be checked with simple measuring methods. View full abstract»

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  • Design Parameters for Sampled-Data Drives for CNC Machine Tools

    Page(s): 255 - 264
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    A mathematical analysis of a typical sampled-data servo-drive for computer numerical control (CNC) machine tools is presented with the objective of providing the control engineer with useful design charts for the selection of system parameters. A mathematical model is first developed which facilitates the evaluation of the relation between servo-loop gain and computer sampling rate. The question of stability is reviewed, and a solution for the time response of the sampled-data system is presented. Different performance criteria are discussed including: selection of desired damping factor; maximum overshoot; integral of speed square-error; position steady-state error; and the absolute value of the error. The latter criterion has been chosen as the most useful approach. System performance evaluation is presented in the form of dimensionless charts. A final design procedure is recommended which utilizes a dimensionless chart to select sample rate and gain in order to achieve an optimal performance consistent with allowable contouring accuracy and closed-loop bandwidth. View full abstract»

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  • Basic Operating Characteristics of a High-Frequency Inverter with Capacitive Voltage Multiplier

    Page(s): 264 - 269
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    The integrodifferential equations of the equivalent circuit are solved, and the operating characteristics are derived for a currentfed thyristor inverter. This inverter can be especially useful as a highfrequency power source for induction heating. View full abstract»

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  • Safety Considerations in the Design and Operation of Coal Systems for Cement Factories

    Page(s): 269 - 274
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    Safety in the design and operation of coal systems in cement plants is a matter of following known design requirements and practices and following good operational and maintenance procedures. Coal is a fuel, and under the right conditions, can explode and burn. Good alarms and protective devices, coupled with good cleanup and safe maintenance practices, can overcome a potentially hazardous operation. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical Rooms in Cement Plants: Sealing and Fire Stopping

    Page(s): 275 - 281
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    Electrical equipment for a cement plant should be placed in rooms for protection of the equipment itself and to avoid unauthorized persons from coming in contact with the equipment. Electrical equipment generates heat, and this heat must be dissipated in order to maintain the ambient temperature within the proper limits. There is also a possibility of electrical fires due to faults in the electrical equipment, and steps must be taken to prevent fire from spreading throughout the room and the rest of the facility. Some of the recommendations reflect the typical approach used in Germany and may not necessarily be used in the United States. View full abstract»

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  • Direct Resistance Heating Characteristics of Rectangular Sheet Blanks

    Page(s): 282 - 288
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    The results of an investigation of the characteristics of heating rectangular sheet blanks by the direct passage of current are presented. An analysis of the thermal characteristics based on the heat-transfer equation of a material with internal heat generation produces data for temperature distribution and heat balance at any instant of the heating process. The instantaneous temperatures detennined by experiments are in good agreement with those obtained from the theoretical analysis. The results indicate that a uniform temperature rise over the bulk of the strip can be obtained with larger currents per unit width. The overall efficiency is expressed as a product of indicated thermal efficiency which relates to the heat transfer characteristics of the strip, and electrical transmission efficiency which relates to the electrical characteristics of the heating system. Results are given for the dependence of indicated thermal efficiency on the speed of heating and the length of the strip, as well as for the variation of electrical transmission efficiency with the length of the strip. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The scope of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS includes all scope items of the IEEE Industry Applications Society, that is, the advancement of the theory and practice of electrical and electronic engineering in the development, design, manufacture, and application of electrical systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; industry leadership in energy conservation and environmental, health, and safety issues; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices; and the professional development of its membership.

Full Aims & Scope

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Editor-in-Chief
Carlton E. Speck