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IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering

Issue 4 • Oct. 1969

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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Group

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):233 - 234
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  • Introduction

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): 235
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  • History of Venous Research

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):236 - 247
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5276 KB)

    During ancient times and the Middle Ages, knowledge about veins was more accurate than about arteries and the heart. The description of valves in the veins in 1536 induced William Harvey to think that blood flows unidirectionally. This reasoning led him to the discovery of circulation in 1628. Thereafter the venous system received little attention. Venous pressures were first measured by Stephen H... View full abstract»

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  • In Vivo Measurement of Dimensions of Veins with Implications Regarding Control of Venous Return

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):247 - 253
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5650 KB)

    Control of the capacity of the venous system has been postulated as necessary to provide increased venous return to initiate an increase in cardiac output. In chronic animal experiments, we have studied the dimensions of the liver, spleen, and the superior vena cava as venous reservoirs in relation to fright, exercise, and shock. Two methods used were miniature mutual inductance coils and ultrason... View full abstract»

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  • Wall Properties of Veins

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):253 - 261
    Cited by:  Papers (37)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4644 KB)

    After a brief review of the venous wall structure, the physical properties of veins are discussed in terms of their stress-strain relationships. In contrast to the high pressure arterial system, the low pressure venous system may exhibit large changes in volume without major pressure changes. Inferences about wall properties and intravascular volume from pressure measurements alone are thus meanin... View full abstract»

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  • The Transmission Characteristics of Large and Small Pressure Waves in the Abdominal vena Cava

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):262 - 273
    Cited by:  Papers (12)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (6713 KB)

    The mechanical behavior of the abdominal venae cavae of anesthetized dogs has been studied by measuring the speed, attenuation, and changes in waveform of various kinds of artificially induced pressure signals. The propagation of large amplitude pressure waves is shown to be affected by reflection interference and pronounced nonlinear phenomena. For pressure signals exceeding a few mmHg the speed ... View full abstract»

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  • Flow Through Collapsible Tubes and Through in Situ Veins

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):274 - 283
    Cited by:  Papers (28)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4571 KB)

    The flow of blood in veins differs from the flow of liquids in rigid, circular tubes in that veins are collapsible vessels. Studies in models employing thin-walled rubber tubes and in the intact animal have shown that the flow (ml/s) of liquid through such a collapsible tube, in which the pressure immediately downstream to the collapsed segment is less than the pressure surrounding the collapsed s... View full abstract»

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  • Pressure-Flow Relationships in Collapsible Tubes

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):284 - 295
    Cited by:  Papers (126)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (4556 KB)

    The pressure-flow characteristic of a short collapsible tube held open at its ends and inserted between two constrictions was investigated as a function of flow for different external pressures and downstream constrictions. Taking the upstream and downstream pressure and the flow through the tube as coordinates, a surface can be determined from which the results of any steady flow investigation at... View full abstract»

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  • A Mathematical Model for the Pressure-Flow Relationship in a Segment of Vein

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):296 - 307
    Cited by:  Papers (11)  |  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (3639 KB)

    The cross section of veins changes both in area and in shape as the transmural pressure varies. This implies that the relationship between pressure and flow in such collapsible vessels is not a linear one. In this paper, the techniques which apply to arteries are extended to include the case where the tube may collapse, as in the case of veins, and a relationship between pressure and flow is deter... View full abstract»

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  • An Integrated Approach to the Study of the Venous System with Steps Toward a Detailed Model of the Dynamics of Venous Return to the Right Heart

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):308 - 324
    Cited by:  Papers (30)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (5336 KB)

    We attempt to define, in terms familiar to engineers, physicists, and workers in the life sciences, the uncontrolled mechanical system returning venous blood to the right heart. Our ultimate aim is to complete a description of the venous circulation useful to close the loop with current models of the arterial circulation and the heart. Such a detailed global circulatory model will incorporate even... View full abstract»

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  • Computer Simulation Studies of the Venous Circulation

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):325 - 334
    Cited by:  Papers (55)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2776 KB)

    An analog computer model of the human cardiovascular system has been set up in which detailed attention is given to the representation of pressure and flow events in the veins, including effects of gravity, collapse, breathing, and the action of venous valves. This model, which includes a control loop for heart rate, was checked against human venous pressure waveforms and against response of the h... View full abstract»

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  • Difficulties in the Further Development of Venous Hemodynamics

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):335 - 338
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1312 KB)

    The validity of hemodynamic theories developed for the arterial tree is examined with respect to their applicability to the venous system. The Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are given and the assumptions (in terms of these equations) found useful and justifiable for arterial theories are briefly described. The validity of these assumptions with respect to the venous system is considered. T... View full abstract»

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  • A Light Source for Pupil Stimulation

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):338 - 340
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (991 KB)

    For satisfactory controllable light stimulus to be used for experiments on the human pupillary servomechanism, we designed a system using a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) electrooptic light modulator and an amplifier capable of giving a suitable high-voltage signal. View full abstract»

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  • Synchronous Initiation of Paced Pressure and Flow Signal Recordings

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):340 - 341
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB)

    Fourier analyses of physiological pressure and flow signals are required to determine the complex fluid impedance at the various harmonics of the fundamental frequency. Digital computer programming is eased if a readily recognized event initiates the simultaneous recording of both pressure and flow signals. Digital switching elements in simple electronic circuits are used to synchronously initiate... View full abstract»

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): 341
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  • Abstracts of dissertations

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):342 - 345
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  • Acknowledgment to Reviewers

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): 346
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  • 1969 Index IEEE Transactions on Bio-Medical Engineering Vol BME-16

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):346a - 346d
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  • Subject index

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s):346d - 346g
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  • IEEE Transactions on Bio-Medical Engineering Statement of Editorial Policy

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): 346-h
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1969, Page(s): 346i
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
University of Minnesota