By Topic

Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Jan. 1968

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (584 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Group

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (181 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special PROCEEDINGS Issue on Neural Elements and Systems

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (86 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (98 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A Note on the Theory of Backscattering of Light by Living Tissue

    Page(s): 4 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1424 KB)  

    A set of equations derived to describe the optics of highly scattering materials are explained, extended, and applied to the problem of in vitro and in vivo measurement of the relative oxygen saturation of nonhemolyzed blood. Fundamental absorption and scattering coefficients are described and related to the absorption coefficient of hemolyzed blood. Diffusion equations for light photons are used to solve the scattering problem in a three-dimensional system that may be useful for in vivo oxyhemoglobin measurements. Crude application to published data from in vitro measurements on nonhemolyzed blood indicates that the scattering coefficient of whole blood is probably not very wavelength-dependent. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An Acoustic Bridge for Measuring the Static and Dynamic Impedance of the Eardrum

    Page(s): 10 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2570 KB)  

    An acoustic impedance bridge is described that is capable of measuring the input impedance of the human ear in the frequency range of 250 to 1250 Hz, with an accuracy of 3 degrees and 5 percent in phase and magnitude, respectively. In addition to static impedance, the bridge measures and records both in-phase and quadrature components (re an arbitrary reference) of changes in the ear's impedance due to the acoustic reflex. Assumptions upon which the use of the bridge is based are stated, the calibration procedure is described, and an example of the use of the bridge is given. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Detection of Weak Foetal Electrocardiograms by Autocorrelation and Crosscorrelation of Envelopes

    Page(s): 17 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1181 KB)  

    There is no general rule that abdominally recorded electrocardiograms of pregnant women reveal visible foetal R waves. In some stages of pregnancy the foetal electrocardiogram (FECG) is even smaller than a slightly noisy baseline. It is also possible that large muscle disturbance (electromyogram) makes the FECG invisible. On the one hand, there is a redundancy of information in the form of a long lasting FECG and, on the other hand, the human eye fails to survey this information stream. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Low-Frequency Piezoelectric Energy Conversion for an Intrathoracic Artificial Heart

    Page(s): 24 - 33
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3266 KB)  

    The present paper is concerned with an evaluation of a piezoelectric energy conversion system in which two columns of piezoelectric ceramic disks are excited axially by means of thin metallic shims stacked alternately with the disks. Mechanical energy output is extracted through the expansion and contraction of the Columns. The treatment is based upon the equivalent circuit approach first suggested by Mason. A lever system is used in making the mechanical impedance transformation between the very high force and small displacement of the piezoelectric columns and the low force and relatively large displacement required for an artificial heart. The role of mass loading in improving the power capability and efficiency of the energy converter is clearly indicated. It is concluded that the theoretical energy output per unit mass of material per cycle and the efficiency of conversion are such as to justify a continued developmental effort. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Study of Power Spectra Analysis of Normal Finger Tremors

    Page(s): 33 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5155 KB)  

    Measurements of ``normal,'' neuromuscular finger tremor acceleration in healthy adults were made and then analyzed by power spectra and correlation techniques. These techniques from random-signal analysis offer objective methods by which tremors may be described and compared quantitatively. Measurements of this type may provide useful information in evaluating surgical and medical treatments of Parkinson's disease; furthermore, if relations between tremor phenomena and certain physiological and pathological states are established, these techniques will have diagnostic value. Some interesting and useful results evolved from this study; the power density spectra, autocorrelograms, and cumulative power spectra of the tremor measurements are presented and discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Continuous Multichannel Automatic Curve Reader

    Page(s): 46 - 53
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2579 KB)  

    Details of construction and characteristics of performance for a multichannel analog curve reader are described. This system is intended primarily for automatic transcription of bioelectric-data recordings such as electroencephalograms, and employs the principle of phase-modulated analog sampling. It utilizes electro-encephalographs, polygraphs, or similar devices through which the original recordings are rerun for transcription; the usual ink-writing pens of these devices are replaced by self-contained photoelectric scanning pens. The system is versatile in its operation, permitting either the slow-speed exact duplication of ink-written traces or similar data, or high-speed transcriptions (within the limits of the sampling theorem) for computer analysis, either directly, or via the intermediary of magnetic-tape recordings. The number of channels is optional and readily expandable; an 8-channel system has been constructed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Computer Analyses of Clinical Electroencephalographic Ink Tracings with the Aid of a High-Speed Automatic Curve Reader

    Page(s): 54 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7595 KB)  

    Computer analyses of clinical electroencephalographic (EEG) ink tracings, which were reconverted to their electrical form with the aid of a newly developed multichannel automatic curve reader, are illustrated. On-line and off-line (via the intermediary of a magnetic tape recording) analyses by a variety of methods (frequency analysis, autocorrelation and crosscorrelation, and averaging of EEG responses evoked by sensory stimulation) were made of EEG tracings (some recorded 16 years previously) from a variety of different clinical conditions. Comparison, in some instances, of the data obtained by means of the curve reader with those computed from a magnetic tape recording made simultaneously with the original ink recording showed that the results of the two were essentially indistinguishable, within the limitations of the frequency response of the original ink tracing, and that of the scanning principle of the curve reader. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contributors

    Page(s): 66 - 67
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2406 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Announcements

    Page(s): 68
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (201 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering contains basic and applied papers dealing with biomedical engineering. Papers range from engineering development in methods and techniques with biomedical applications to experimental and clinical investigations with engineering contributions.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Bin He
Department of Biomedical Engineering