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Aerospace and Electronic Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date July 1984

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): c2
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  • From the Editors

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 305
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  • The Development of Systems Engineering

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 306 - 310
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Systems engineering is described as the design of the whole as distinguished from the design of the parts. Systems engineers create the architecture of the system, define the criteria for its evaluation, and perform tradeoff studies for optimization of the subsystem characteristics. In addition to their own brains, the principal tool of systems engineers is the computer. Systems engineering has evolved during a long series of major developments, in particular the intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) program. The major growth of systems engineering is expected to be in the improvement of its tools and in the enlargement of the range of problems to which it is applied. View full abstract»

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  • Space Activities-A Review and a Look Ahead

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 311 - 315
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    The paper reviews the progress made in manned and unmanned space programs during the last 25 years and names several major accomplishments. The ingredients of success are identified as good engineering, good technology, and good management of a very complex enterprise. An argument is made that the pace of progress will be governed not by technological advances, which can be very rapid, but rather by future institutional arrangements, which are much slower to evolve. It is predicted that the most likely space activities for the next 20 years will be those relating to space commercialization, and several examples are cited. A hope is expressed that policy makers and entrepreneurs will match the spirit of adventure and risk-taking exhibited by engineers in exploring uncharted territory. View full abstract»

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  • Remote Sensing: The Next 50 Years

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 316 - 324
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Remote sensing is viewed as a complete system for observing and managing man's environment on Earth. The sensing portion of the system consists of space, air, and ground observing platforms, sensors, communications, computational capabilities and interpretation, and recognition algorithms. The data are put to use using environmental models, geographic information systems, and management models. Progress and potentials in each of these system elements are reviewed and projected. Existing and potential uses are sketched and certain institutional, diplomatic, and national security issues are identified. Some underlying reasons for belief in continued progress are mentioned and the need for certain crucial choices in the future stated which will determine which of a number of possible futures will be realized. View full abstract»

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  • NOAA Satellite Programs

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 325 - 344
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A description is given of current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs involving Landsat as well as the METSAT polar-orbiting and geostationary satellites. These include the use of NOAA satellites as data collection platforms and the use of NOAA satellite radiometers in monitoring meteorologic, oceanographic, hydrologic, and agricultural phenomena. Configuration of the next generation of NOAA satellite sensors and spacecraft is included along with a final section on research directions and results. View full abstract»

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  • Future Commercial Directions in Environmental Remote Sensing from Space

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 345 - 362
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    Potential developments are considered for commercial applications of environmental remote sensing from space. The key areas affecting the possible growth of commercial markets that apply the sciences of meteorology, oceanography, and hydrology are discussed and projections made for 1985-2000. These areas include technology developments, markets, fiscal issues, political/legal/regulatory issues, and others. The growth will not be primarily limited by technology, but important uncertainties exist in the fiscal, political, and market development areas. With proper definition of government and commercial roles, both sectors can continue to maintain U. S. leadership in this area. View full abstract»

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  • Developments in Radar Imaging

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 363 - 400
    Cited by:  Papers (262)  |  Patents (5)
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    Using range and Doppler information to produce radar images is a technique used in such diverse fields as air-to-ground imaging of objects, terrain, and oceans and ground-to-air imaging of aircraft, space objects, and planets. A review of the range-Doppler technique is presented along with a description of radar imaging forms including details of data acquisition and processing techniques. View full abstract»

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  • C3: The Challenge of Change

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 401 - 413
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    The power, range, and speed of weapons have increased exponentially during the last 50 or so years. The more powerful the weapon, the more serious becomes its use. The faster the weapon, the shorter the reaction time required of the user. The greater the range of the weapon, the larger the problem of knowing target location. The more quickly these parameters change, the greater the user's learning problem and the less the opportunity to learn through experience. The cultural shock widely recognized in society in general is even more serious to today's military commander, because the consequences of his acts can be global in nature. Technology offers some help in making the use of modern weapons more efficient and in reducing the probability of unwanted effects. But the problem of matching the rapidly changing new technology to the rapidly changing requirements of military command, control, and communications (C3), selecting improvements that will help, and rejecting those just nice to have-all this, in the absence of pertinent experience, is the challenge of change. View full abstract»

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  • Inertial Technology for the Future

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 414 - 444
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    There are many different approaches to inertial instruments-to be useful a concept has to be sound, but success is the fruition of solving myriads of design details. The concept of the electrostatically suspended gyro has been proven to be sound, but the Rockwell and Honeywell designs are quite different. The floated instrument concept is sound, but design details of the North American (now Rockwell) inertial navigator on the Nautilus arctic patrol were quite different from those of the M. I. T. Instrumentation Laboratory (now Draper Laboratory). These are but examples illustrating the many useful inertial instrument technologies in being and point up that not only do different concepts have a place in time and application, but different designs of the same concept often fulfill a need. The future will be no different. A number of leading experts provide short surveys of the principal inertial technologies of today and what is to be expected in the next 25 years. Not all predictions are congruent-like stock market predictions, you are left to decide for yourself. View full abstract»

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  • From Autopilot to Strapdown: Electrotechnology in Inertial Guidance and Control

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 445 - 454
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Electrotechnology has been a significant factor in the evolution of guidance and control (G & C) over the last half century. Ship stabilizers that used rotating wheels for brute force control were electrically driven. However, the first pilotless aircraft, developed in World War I, was controlled primarily with pneumatic servos. Inertial guidance and electronic control systems surfaced at Peenemunde around World War II. Advances in fire control servos led to development of the floated gyro and ushered in precision inertial navigators. Digital electronics replaced analog designs, so that the level of G & C sophistication increased dramatically. As digital computers became smaller and more powerful their use proliferated. The manned space program in the 60's saw substantial improvements in electronics reliability and performance. The successful first launch of the Space Shuttle, with all its complexity, is a tribute to electronics progress. It is difficult to predict what G & C advances electrotechnology will bring in the next 50 years. View full abstract»

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  • Overview of Commercial Satellite Communications

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 455 - 464
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
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    The period from Arthur Clarke's 1945 prediction of geosynchronous satellite communications covering the entire planet until satellites were stationed over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans was less than 25 years. In the following 15 year period, satellite communications has affected all of us. Most international calls are carried by satellite. Much of the television that we watch has been relayed, processed, or distributed by satellite. In fact, many of us who live in cabled cities can choose among 50 channels or more for viewing on a particular night, largely brought to us by satellite. Some morning papers, radio programs, and basic weather data appear coast to coast rapidly because of the satellite. Even while we sleep, computers in an increasing number of business offices are talking to each other by satellite. Virtually the whole world, from the busiest urban center to the most remote island, can be interconnected by satellite communications networks capable of providing economical and reliable transmission of communications signals, including voice, data, electronic mail, and video. The satellite's advantages of distance insensitivity, point-to-multipoint capability, and improved quality over long distances are unique. These facts have led Clarke to speculate on the future impact of satellite communications in The View from Serendip (1977): I submit . . . that the eventual impact of the communications satellite upon the whole human race will be at least as great as that of the telephone upon the so-called developed societies. View full abstract»

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  • U. S. Navy in Space: Past, Present, and Future

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 465 - 485
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    The announcement last summer of the establishment of the U. S. Navy Space Command, and its subsequent activation at Dahlgren, Va., in October 1983, may have come as a surprise to some. This, however, was the latest of a series of actions taken by the Department of the Navy over the last several years to consolidate the Navy's space efforts. In fact, since the beginning of the Space Age, the Navy has been interested in space and involved in space-related activities. Its contributions in space science and technology have been significant. Driven by a realization that space assets are exceptionally well matched to its global mission, the Navy has become a major user of space. Primary areas of current activity include command, control, and communication and navigation and collection of environmental information. The Navy's operational use of space systems, the nature of the evolving Soviet threat (both air and space) directed in a large measure at U. S. naval targets, and the recent advances made in space technology, all argue for an increased level of Navy involvement in future Department of Defense space activities to secure Navy interests. As viewed by Navy decision-makers, this increased level of involvement will be selective in nature, emphasizing space research and development and operations that are considered vital to Navy interests. View full abstract»

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  • Digital Avionics-The Best is yet to Come!!!

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 486 - 492
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    This paper reviews some of the history and background of digital avionics and offers some tantalizing possibilities for the future. There are payoffs in many areas from digital avionics; however, the ultimate benefits are increased mission effectiveness and lower costs. Two major U. S. Air Force avionics programs designed to increase mission effectiveness are reviewed. Major barriers to the expanded use of digital avionics in civil transports as a means to lower operating costs are examined. The paper also examines lightning effects, architectures, optical components, displays, and voice interactive control which are current research areas that promise to yield significant advances for digital avionics systems. Finally, in a notice of optimism, it is concluded that the best is yet to come. As good as contemporary avionics are, we have only begun to visualize their ultimate potential. View full abstract»

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  • Power Electronics in Space: A Review and Projection

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 493 - 499
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    Power electronics has emerged as a distinct field of electrical engineering in recent years. This emergence is closely linked with the development of power control and conversion equipment for space application over the last 20 years. Development of switched-mode power conversion techniques has been the dominant activity in this field, spurred by both the improvements in solid-state power devices and the needs of space systems for light weight, highly efficient techniques for dc power regulation. This history is reviewed and projections are made in the four key areas of circuit fundamentals, components, circuit practice, and applications. View full abstract»

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  • The Kalman Filter Applied to Aerospace and Electronic Systems

    Publication Year: 1984 , Page(s): 500 - 504
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
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    The evolution of the application of the Kalman filter in the aerospace arena is traced. The major programs that were the driving forces for the filter's acceptance are noted, as are the specific threads of activity for refining and enhancing the initial contribution. These efforts brought the fundamental ideas presented by Kalman to the point where actual application was possible. Clearly the concepts of the Kalman filter are now "mature." This is also noted and substantiated. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems focuses on the equipment, procedures, and techniques applicable to the organization, installation, and operation of functional systems designed to meet the high performance requirements of earth and space systems.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Lance Kaplan
Army Research Laboratory