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Broadcasting, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date Aug. 1960

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Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • IRE Transactions on Broadcasting

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Broadcasting

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 2
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  • Report on World Radio Conference Geneva, Switzerland, 1959

    Page(s): 3 - 7
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    A report on the world radio conference held in Geneva, Switzerland, during the last four months of 1959 is presented. The Conference was held under auspices of the International Telecommunication Union, the specialized agency of the United Nations which deals with radio and other telecommunication matters at international level. The organization of the conference is described, to show the mechanism by which engineers and telecommunication administrators from many nations work together to produce what amounts to international legislation in a highly technical field. The four principal work areas of the conference were: Radio spectrum allocations; frequency management techniques; definition of technical terms and establishment of technical standards; and operating regulations in the aeronautical and maritime radio services. Major decisions of interest to engineers in the United States are summarized, including new terminology which engineers will be expected to learn gradually in the years ahead. View full abstract»

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  • Future Possibilities for Film Room Mechanization

    Page(s): 8 - 12
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    New equipment is proposed for simplifying the telecasting of slides and film. All 21"x2" slides currently in use are carried in one magazine. They are aired by momentary projection onto a storage tube which is then read out continuously while the slide is changed. View full abstract»

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  • Directional Antennas for Television Broadcasting

    Page(s): 13 - 19
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    Desirable operating characteristics and other requirements of directional transmitting antennas suitable for television broadcasting are considered. Basic limitations on directivity are imposed by long-distance propagation phenomena and reflections of signals into the weak-signal zones. Previous experience with directional antennas used for television broadcasting is reviewed. A number of appropriate antenna types are suggested. View full abstract»

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  • Service Area of an Airborne Television Network

    Page(s): 20
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    An educational television network using UHF transmissions from aircraft has been suggested as a means to provide improved classroom instruction to schools throughout the country. Initial airborne tests will begin in 1960. As a step in the evaluation of such a network, calculations have been made which describe the coverage from an airborne station in the presence of interference from other stations. The results should be useful in determining the equipment and channel requirements of a nation-wide network. These requirements will be compared with those necessary to provide equivalent coverage from ground-based UHF stations. View full abstract»

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  • A Modern TV Transmitter Plant Input System

    Page(s): 25 - 38
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    All the complex products of the television studio plant flow to the viewing audience through the transmitting plant and as the final link in the system it has an extremely heavy responsibility. To meet this responsibility the transmitting plant must have an input and control system that can act like a nerve center; be capable of continuous quality monitoring and instant corrective action. As part of a program of plant modernization and quality improvement a completely new and simple transmitting plant input system was designed. This paper outlines the study of transmitting plant functions and responsibilities that dictated the design, and describes the circuit and operating features of the resultant system. View full abstract»

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  • A Special Effects Amplifier for Non-Composite or Composite, Monochrome or Color Television Signals

    Page(s): 39 - 46
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    Upon the introduction of special effects techniques for monochrome television in the late thirties, there evolved two philosophies concerning the proper location in the system at which the synchronizing signals should be combined with the video signals. One thesis has contended that the two signals should be united as soon as possible, preferably in the camera, while a second one has advocated the addition of the synchronizing pulses to the video information after the studio switching operations have been completed. The latter method has been so widely accepted by the networks and local stations that until now it has been almost universal in its adoption. View full abstract»

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  • Remote Control of TV Microwave Equipment

    Page(s): 47 - 54
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    Recent actions by the FCC have made it possible for privately owned and operated microwave links to be constructed by television stations. The need for remote control of the systems has brought about the development of some novel techniques for input switching, system reversal, and the transmission of control information. Hardware designed for these functions will be described. View full abstract»

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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 54a
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 54b
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    Page(s): 54c
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    Page(s): 54d
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting.

Full Aims & Scope