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Software, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date May-June 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 27
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Starwest Conference

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Dr. Dobb's Architecture & Design World

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2 - 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Infamous Ratio Measure

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 4 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (358 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Examines the use of ratios and other derived metrics in software measurement. View full abstract»

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  • Requiring Design, Designing Requirements

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 8 - 9
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Improving Evidence about Software Technologies: A Look at Model-Based Testing

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 10 - 13
    Cited by:  Papers (18)
    Multimedia
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (805 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A rich body of experiences hasn't yet been published on all the software development techniques researchers have proposed. In fact, by some estimates, the techniques for which we do have substantial experience are few and far between. When we started looking at the evidence on model-based testing (MBT), we thought we'd come across some strong studies that showed this approach's capabilities compared to conventional testing techniques-this wasn't the case. However, we can still extract some useful knowledge and also discuss some issues that are relevant to other software technologies with similar types of evidence. View full abstract»

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  • Design Strategy

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 14 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (193 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software designers and managers can find it challenging to agree on the "sweet spots" of their system that warrant their best design efforts. Most projects are short on time, budget, and resources. How can you stay ahead of the design curve, and where should you focus your design energies to gain the most leverage? The essence of strategy is that you must set limits on what you're trying to accomplish. View full abstract»

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  • Requirements Elicitation with and for Older Adults

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 16 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (480 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The study investigated the strengths and weaknesses of existing user-centered design (UCD) methods for eliciting requirements from older adults. A case study in which older people are involved in designing, developing, and evaluating a virtual-garden prototype. Users could potentially employ this device (which has an interface that resembles a real garden) as an empathic information appliance that would provide weather forecasts and help control smart devices and assistive technologies. Creativity-oriented techniques are suggested to designers, developers, and engineers when creating products so that older people are included in the market consideration. View full abstract»

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  • Architectural Organizational Patterns

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 18 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (179 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    To set the context for the discussion that follows, there are some fundamentals worth repeating. The author talked about each of these to some degree in previous columns, so let me summarize here: 1) all architecture is design, but not all design is architecture. A system's architecture is defined by its significant design decisions, where in the author's experience, "significant" is measured by the cost of change. 2) Most architectures are accidental; some are intentional. 3) Every software-intensive system has an architecture, forged from the hundreds of thousands of small decisions made every day. 4) The code is the truth, but not the whole truth. Most architectural information is preserved in tribal memory. 5) All well-structured software-intensive systems are full of patterns. View full abstract»

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  • Getting Software RITE

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 20 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (203 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In traditional software development environments, many designers don't routinely put their software in front of users. If the ultimate measure of well-designed software is how effectively it serves its intended purpose, then validating that it does so is critical, and the sooner the better. Many user-centered design practitioners do this with usability testing. A formal usability test is a rather sciencey affair. It involves a number of different people in different roles. This paper deals with software design validation. This test-fix-test-fix cycle continues until the software starts to feel pretty tight. This approach is called RITE (Rapid Iterative Testing and Evaluation). View full abstract»

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  • Software Builders

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 22 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (185 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The tools and processes we use to transform our system's source code into an application that we can deploy or ship have always been important, but nowadays they can mean the difference between success and failure. The reasons are simple: larger code bodies; teams that are bigger, more fluid, and more widely distributed; richer interactions with other code; and sophisticated tool chains. All these mean that a slapdash software build process will be an endless drain on productivity and an embarrassing source of bugs, while a high-quality one will give us developers more time and traction to build better software. View full abstract»

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  • The Case for Quantitative Process Management

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 24 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (656 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article introduces a special section on "Embedding Statistical Methods into Software Engineering Practices." It provides a background on Quantitative Process Management and makes the case for why these methods are important. It presents an example of how a model can be developed to predict project outcomes by using data emerging from the performance of process tasks. It discusses how these methods can be used with different software development paradigms. It ends by summarizing develops needed in five different communities in order for these methods to be widely adopted. View full abstract»

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  • Stochastic Optimization Modeling and Quantitative Project Management

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 29 - 36
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1680 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Successful projects manage and balance four variables effectively: schedule, effort (or cost), scope, and quality. Project activities influence these four variables as distributions rather than deterministically. Thus, the end results expected from a project with respect to those variables are a function of all the distributions associated with each activity. Integrating stochastic optimization modeling (SOM) with quantitative project management (QPM) lets projects factor in uncertainties and get near-real-time feedback, so they can monitor key variables and initiate corrective action.This case study provides a detailed description of our implementing SOM and QPM in a development project. Our project's scope was to develop a resource management application that facilitated centralized data collection with distributed reporting. View full abstract»

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  • Making Statistics Part of Decision Making in an Engineering Organization

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 37 - 47
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (687 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article reports our experiences deploying statistical methods at BAE Systems Network Systems (BAE NS), a software and systems development organization. We focus not on the methods' mathematical details but on the problem of deploying them to managers and practitioners. Of course, misunderstanding and misuse of these methods will interfere with their successful deployment, so some knowledge of statistical methods is required. View full abstract»

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  • Point/Counterpoint

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 48 - 51
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (570 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    "Point Argument: Applying SPC to Software Development: Where and Why," by Ed Weller and David Card. Statistical Process Control focuses on key subprocesses in the overall software development process. Under the right conditions, SPC is another useful tool in our toolkit. "Counterpoint Argument: Software Data Violate SPC's Underlying Assumptions," by Bob Raczynski and Bill Curtis. Software tasks are an intermingled mix of skill levels, component complexities, and project conditions that severely diminish the power of SPC techniques such as control charts. This department is part of a special issue on quantitative project management. View full abstract»

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  • Open Source Software in Industry

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 52 - 53
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (99 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many of today's most innovative products and solutions are developed on the basis of free and open source software (FOSS). Most of us can no longer imagine the world of software engineering without open source operating systems, databases, application servers, Web servers, frameworks, and tools. Brands such as Linux, MySQL, Apache, and Eclipse have shaped product and service development. They facilitate competition and open markets as well as innovation to meet new challenges. De facto FOSS standards such as Eclipse and Corba simplify the integration of products, whether they're all from one company or from multiple suppliers. IEEE Software has assembled this theme section to provide a brief yet practical overview of where FOSS is heading. View full abstract»

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  • Should You Adopt Open Source Software?

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 54 - 59
    Cited by:  Papers (25)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (205 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Many organizations use open source infrastructure software such as Linux, and open source software (OSS) is generally considered a viable technology. Both professional and academic literature devote much attention to the OSS phenomenon. However, decision makers considering the adoption of OSS face a plethora of books, research papers, and articles highlighting OSS's advantages and disadvantages. Different articles attach different levels of importance to these advantages or factors related to the adoption decision. Reasons for adopting OSS vary from the pragmatic. Organizations must consider the advantages and disadvantages of open source software before adopting it. View full abstract»

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  • The Bazaar inside the Cathedral: Business Models for Internal Markets

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 60 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (302 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software product-line development lets organizations better optimize software development efficiency by building a shared set of assets for reuse in multiple products. This process introduces many challenges, not least of which is creating the initial set of reusable software assets. To accomplish this, organizations often establish a central software platform group. Such a group faces a serious problem: existing systems groups already have a large set of software components that they use to build their products. If companies are to successfully transition to product-line development, these systems groups must shift their investments from existing software components to the new reusable product-line assets. One way to encourage this is to create an internal open source software community that lets systems groups actively contribute their existing components to the platform. In OSS, a community works together to develop software. Because the software's users are part of the community, they can add the assets they need. Inner-source-software (ISS) development applies OSS within a limited environment that has a closed border (such as a company, a division, or a consortium). So, companies using the ISS approach essentially establish an OSS community within the confines of their organization. View full abstract»

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  • RFID Applications: Interfacing with Readers

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 67 - 70
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (381 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Improving efficiency is a major driver for increasing workflow automation and data integration, whether in software development or in application domains such as enterprise computing. Recently, RFID has been boosting workflow efficiency across production and supply networks. This physical identification technology relies on radio transmitters and receivers embedded in products of all types to itt >re and remotely retrieve data. It illustrates how the traditionally separate worlds of embedded and IT software are merging, and it demands skills in both worlds. Christian Floerkemeier and Flgar Fleisch describe the software issues in deploring RFID. View full abstract»

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  • Implementing Requirements Engineering Processes: Using Cooperative Self-Assessment and Improvement

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 71 - 77
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Requirements engineering can help assure success for projects and their products. Small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs) demand effective, efficient RE practice because they must adhere to delivery dates and provide the same quality as large organizations, but with a smaller budget and staff. Moreover, these companies are highly affected by each customer's specific needs, and they must react accordingly. View full abstract»

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  • Avoiding Irrelevant and Misleading Information When Estimating Development Effort

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 78 - 83
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (347 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Software projects average about 30 percent accuracy in effort estimation.1 Expecting highly accurate effort estimates might be unrealistic because software development projects are inherently uncertain. Nevertheless, software professionals' tendency toward overly optimistic estimates and their high level of estimation inconsistency suggest potential for improving effort estimation processes. View full abstract»

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  • Flexible Self-Management Using the Model-View-Controller Pattern

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 84 - 90
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (487 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A self-management infrastructure requires a self-representation to model system functionality concerns. The model-view-controller design pattern can improve concern separation in a self-representation. Future computing initiatives such as ubiquitous and pervasive computing, large-scale distribution, and on-demand computing will foster unpredictable and complex environments with challenging demands. Next-generation systems will require flexible system infrastructures that can adapt to both dynamic changes in operational requirements and environmental conditions, while providing predictable behavior in areas such as throughput, scalability, dependability, and security. Successful projects, once deployed, will require skilled administration personnel to install, configure, maintain, and provide 24/7 support. Message-oriented middleware is one of the foundations of distributed systems. View full abstract»

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  • Ultralarge Systems: Redefining Software Engineering?

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 91 - 94
    Cited by:  Papers (8)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (135 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The harbingers of ultralarge systems are indeed emerging, although their elements seem contradictory to the "ultralarge" concept. ULS design will have to move beyond computer science and electrical and electronics engineering-based methodologies to include building blocks from seven major research areas: human interaction; computational emergence; design; computational engineering; adaptive system infrastructure; adaptable and predictable system quality; and policy, acquisition, and management. We need to integrate these more novel approaches with the tools and techniques of traditional software engineering, especially with regard to formal methods and to dealing with predictability and uncertainty in high-integrity software systems. Our view is not so much that we are 'redefining' software engineering but rather that we're looking to extend established software engineering tools and techniques in novel and useful ways. View full abstract»

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  • Software: Hero or Zero?

    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    People might love to support underdogs, but they also love to kick them when they're down. And, at this point in time at least, software is the world's technological underdog! View full abstract»

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IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
dds@computer.org