By Topic

Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date April 2008

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 16 of 16
  • Front cover - IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Page(s): C1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (318 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Correspondence

    Page(s): C2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (482 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (463 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • In this issue - Technically

    Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (718 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Disaster monitoring and mitigation using aerospace technologies and integrated telecommunication networks

    Page(s): 3 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4227 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    How space technologies and new integrated telecommunication networks can mitigate the impact of natural and man-made disasters. The objective is to design new, potentially attractive telecommunication architectures to better manage a disaster scenario. The strengths and the weaknesses of the proposed space-based telecommunication architectures for the emergency and recovery will be outlined also, to individuate the needs for an optimal provision of information and accessibility of space-related services in case of disaster. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Prototype personal navigation system

    Page(s): 10 - 18
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5036 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Honeywell Laboratories recently funded the development of a prototype personal navigation system based on MEMS technologies. The system components include a MEMS inertial measurement unit, a three-axis magnetometer, a barometric pressure sensor, and a SAASM GPS receiver. The system also uses Honeywell's human motion-based pedometry algorithm. The navigation process is based on a strap-down inertial navigator aided by feedback from a Kalman filter using typical measurements from the GPS, magnetometer and barometer when available. A key innovation is the addition of an independent measurement of distance traveled based on the use of a human motion algorithm. The navigation system combines the best features of dead reckoning and inertial navigation, resulting in positioning performance exceeding that achieved with either method alone. Subsequent to the Honeywell effort, DARPA funded an individual Personal Inertial Navigation System (iPINS) seedling program. Honeywell worked to improve the baseline personal navigation system with the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of reliably achieving navigation accuracy < 1 % of distance traveled in GPS-denied scenarios. In addition, an analysis was conducted to determine the benefit of incorporating terrain correlation into the personal navigation system. The results of this analysis indicate that overall navigation accuracy can be significantly improved through the application of terrain correlation. This presents an are presented. In addition, conclusions from the terrain correlation analysis conducted under the iPINS seedling program are included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Micro air vehicle navigation system

    Page(s): 19 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3331 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A description of the design, operation, and test results of a Micro-Electro-Mechanical (MEMS)-based navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) is presented. The MAV is a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) built by Honeywell. It is one of the first applications to use Honeywell's new HG1930 MEMS inertial measurement unit (IMU). The raw IMU measurements are transmitted via a serial interface to a processor board where the inertial solution is blended in a Kalman filter with measurements from GPS, a barometric altimeter, and a magnetometer. The navigation is performed by Honeywell's ECTOS lie navigation software. The modular ECTOS architecture allows easy customization for use with various IMUs and aiding sources, creating a flexible navigation solution which can be customized to the user's requirements. The MAV has been extensively flight tested both on- and off-tether. Results are presented showing the performance of the MAV navigation system. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fiber lasers: A future technology for lasers in space

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4257 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The constraints of operation in space have largely precluded the use of conventional solid-state laser systems for applications including remote sensing, communication relays, and active laser radars. A new technology, fiber lasers, may offer all of the needed features at an affordable price. An appealing aspect of the fiber laser is that it does not need a rigid optical bench. Only the output end of the fiber need be held in rigid reference to the optical tracking system. Design, fabrication, and testing of the laser resonator is generally the most expensive and longest lead part of the effort for conventional solid-state lasers. Advances in fiber optic technology and devices mean that the "fiber laser" need not be a simple device but may be a complex system employing sophisticated technology, such as wavelength selective Bragg reflectors and nonlinear optical frequency shifters. Three companies have obtained single-mode outputs of 35 - 40 watts single mode at 1.03 - 1.1 mu. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • ISE: intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems

    Page(s): 31 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (8258 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) being developed by NASA, UVA, and JPL for significantly enhancing the rapid creation of innovative affordable products and missions is described. ISE uses a synergistic combination of leading-edge technologies, including high-performance computing, high-capacity communications and networking, virtual product development, knowledge-based engineering, computational intelligence, human-computer interaction, and product information management. The environment will link scientists, design teams, manufacturers, suppliers, and consultants who participate in the mission synthesis, as well as in the creation and operation of the aerospace system. It will radically advance the process by which complex science missions are synthesized, and high-tech engineering systems are designed, manufactured, and operated. The evolution of engineering design is described along with the shortcomings of current product development techniques. The need for ISE to create high-science payoff missions and aerospace systems at affordable costs is discussed. The five major components critical to ISE and some of their sub-elements are described: namely, human-ISE interaction; infrastructure for distributed collaboration; rapid synthesis and simulation tools; intelligent life-cycle system integration; and cultural change in the creative process. Related government and industry programs are outlined and future impact of ISE on complex missions and aerospace systems is discussed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Radar: A case history of an invention [Publication Review]

    Page(s): 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Chapters: where are you? and recognize that individual [From the Editor-in-Chief]

    Page(s): 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (740 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Society news & information - Teresa Pace named associate editor

    Page(s): 46
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (740 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2008 Ultrawideband and Ultrashort Impulse Signal- Call for papers

    Page(s): 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (600 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 2008 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society - Membership application

    Page(s): 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (525 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • AESS Meetings & Conferences

    Page(s): C3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (423 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • [Advertisement - Back cover]

    Page(s): C4
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (645 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com