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Software Engineering Journal

Issue 6 • Date Nov 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • High-level language extensions for user-interface programming

    Page(s): 409 - 424
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1044 KB)  

    Many user-interface toolkits, screen management facilities and user-interface management systems (UIMS) have been developed for creating user interfaces. These systems, however, normally require the user to learn a new programming language or set of techniques. Extending conventional programming languages has the advantage that the same language can be used for describing both the application and the user interface. This paper outlines several drawbacks of conventional high-level procedural languages and presents extensions to Pascal to facilitate user-interface programming. The goal is to provide a language where the display items, dialogue control rules, application software, concurrent operations, and dynamic program linking can all be easily programmed in the same language, without resorting to an assembler language or another language View full abstract»

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  • Transformations using a meta-system approach to software development

    Page(s): 425 - 437
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (916 KB)  

    A transformational approach based on a specification environment definition facility is proposed. The authors illustrate this approach through the development of a set of transformation rules expressed in a transformational language. The rules demonstrate how a formal description of a data-flow diagram in a structure analysis environment can be automatically converted, with possible design intervention, to a formal description of a structure chart in a structured design environment. The formal description of each environment is defined in the entity-aggregate-relationship-attribute (EARA) model, a meta-system model that supports multiple specification environments. To express the transformations between environments, they propose a language based on sets. The power of the approach lies in the adoption of a common formal model for representing source and target specification environments, along with the ability to express formally transformation rules, using the transformational language, between these environments. The details of the model and the rule-based transformation approach are illustrated View full abstract»

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  • An environment for initial software engineering teaching

    Page(s): 438 - 444
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (484 KB)  

    The teaching of software engineering skills is traditionally seen as an activity which follows the acquisition of the ability to `program'. It is proposed that initial software engineering skills can be taught in conjunction with the development of programming skills, by providing a problem-oriented curriculum based on the use of notations to describe `things'. This approach is enhanced if a high degree of integration exists between the concepts and principles introduced to the learner during the study of notations and the organisation of the software development system used for the application of those concepts and principles. This paper argues that initial software engineering skills can be introduced at an early stage so that fundamental and general principles can be applied as soon as possible. Secondly, it argues that a practical environment can be organised which builds directly on, and which exemplifies, the same principles. The approach described provides the learner with a model of systematic software development that is transferable, in whole or part, to conventional less regular, unfamiliar or novel environments View full abstract»

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  • Towards a formal specification of revisable CORE: allowing for change

    Page(s): 393 - 408
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1136 KB)  

    Many requirements analysis tools, techniques and methods exist to help in the development of consistent, complete and valid requirements specifications. However, few, if any, of these methods recognise and take sufficient notice of the iterative nature of eliciting and specifying requirements. The author proposes the development of revisable methods, which reflect the significance of change in evolving requirements specifications, and which would be, as a result, much more flexible than many current techniques. He considers revisable methods by describing the formal development of revisable CORE. To demonstrate its feasibility, a proof of the validity of revisable tabular collection forms is discussed in some detail. This proof also indicates the complexity of the additional rules which revisable methods demand and which makes their manual application a rather daunting prospect. To facilitate the use of revisable CORE, an automated support tool has been implemented, and this is also described View full abstract»

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  • To prototype or not to prototype? That is the question

    Page(s): 388 - 392
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (376 KB)  

    The paper describes an experiment carried out at the Cranfield Institute of Technology to compare the prototyping approach with that of the structured approach for KBS development. The components and constraints imposed on the exercise are presented to provide the background of the experiment. The project's stages of development are described, and the conclusions drawn from the experiment are presented. These conclusions include the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, suggested improvements for each of the approaches, a suggestion for the components of the best approach, and means of carrying out future comparisons View full abstract»

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  • Viewpoints for requirements definition

    Page(s): 375 - 387
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (880 KB)  

    This paper is a survey of the current viewpoint-oriented requirements approaches and a description of an alternative object-oriented viewpoint-based approach. The paper sets out a case for a multiple viewpoint-oriented approach in requirements definition and, using a simple case study, examines the viewpoint approach adopted by three requirements methodologies. The paper concludes by proposing an alternative object-oriented viewpoint-based approach View full abstract»

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