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Intelligent Systems, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2008

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c2 - 1
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  • Reinventing Academic Publishing, Part 3

    Page(s): 2 - 3
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  • Augmented-Cognition Research on the Rise

    Page(s): 4 - 7
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    The first news story, "The Coming Search Revolution" looks at several current applications of AI technology to search engines. The second news story, "Augmented-Cognition Research on the Rise," reports on projects taking different approaches to discover how systems can predictively adapt to individual users' needs. View full abstract»

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  • Estimating Location Using Wi-Fi

    Page(s): 8 - 13
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    This department presents the results of the first Data Mining Contest held at the 2007 International Conference on Data Mining. View full abstract»

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  • Greedy Neighborhood Search for Disaster Relief and Evacuation Logistics

    Page(s): 14 - 23
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    Two major activities in disaster response are evacuation and logistics support. Evacuation from affected areas to medical centers occurs during the initial response phase. Logistics support from supply centers to distribution centers in affected areas tends to continue for a longer time to sustain the basic needs of survivors remaining there. Minimizing delay in providing priority commodities and healthcare to the survivors can greatly improve the survival rate. As a first step toward solving the emergency-logistics problem, we developed Path-Builder, a simple, fast constructive heuristic for identifying a feasible, acceptable solution. Path-Builder is based on a greedy l-neighborhood search technique that extends the definition of neighborhood to suit the problem's special needs. The heuristic selects partial paths to append to vehicle itineraries on the basis of the vehicles' utilities. It constructs all vehicle itineraries in parallel and iteratively, trying to exploit foreseeable opportunities within the vehicles' limited neighborhood. View full abstract»

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  • Toward the Semantic Desktop: The seMouse Approach

    Page(s): 24 - 31
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    Modern computers have enjoyed increasing storage capacity, but the mechanisms that harness this storage power haven't improved proportionally. Whether current desktops have scaled to handle the enormous number of files computers must handle compared to just a few years ago is doubtful at best. Scalability includes not only fault tolerance or performance stability of tools for users to harness this power. The lack of appropriate structures and tools for locating, navigating, relating, and sharing bulky file sets is preventing users from harnessing their PCs' full storage power. Powering desktops with metadata, leading to the semantic desktop, is a promising way to realize this potential. The seMouse approach realizes the promising vision of the semantic desktop. This approach provides seamless integration between file-centered tooling and semantically aware, resource-centered applications. View full abstract»

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  • Enhancing Residential Gateways: A Semantic OSGi Platform

    Page(s): 32 - 40
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    The OSGi (open service gateway initiative) service platform specification is the most widely adopted technology for building a control system for the networked home. Three main features contribute to its success. First, it supports various well-known protocols, simplifying communication among home devices. In addition, it defines a cooperative model for applications to dynamically discover and use services provided by others. Finally, it allows flexible remote management of these applications and the services they provide. So, an OSGi solution supports decentralization, diversification, and ubiquity not only in smart homes but in pervasive environments generally. View full abstract»

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  • Odor Recognition for Intelligent Systems

    Page(s): 41 - 48
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    Smell, it helps remind us when it's time to take out the garbage or change the baby's diaper. We use it to detect danger, such as a gas leak or food burning on the stove. Industries that develop products to help us either smell good or prevent aromatic offense testify to the aesthetic importance of odors, as well as to economic value. Still, olfaction's significance is unparalleled in the animal kingdom, where many species' survival would be jeopardized without the ability to detect and recognize odors. Integrating electronic noses with other sensors on complex, intelligent platforms offers exciting application possibilities and considerable development challenges. View full abstract»

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  • The Smart Architect: Scalable Ontology-Based Modeling of Ancient Chinese Architectures

    Page(s): 49 - 56
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    The smart architect is an innovative intelligent modeling system that can automatically generate architectures in the ancient Chinese architectural style using an ontology-based approach. Our approach aims to implement an architecture modeling system that can identify different elements and styles in a variety of buildings. It should also be able to generate numerous architectures of similar structures or styles based on the semantic knowledge extracted from existing buildings. View full abstract»

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  • Heuristic Solutions for Locating Health Resources

    Page(s): 57 - 63
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    Of the three metaheuristic strategies tested that can help determine healthcare facility locations, scatter search performed the best and fastest. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can cause many health problems, including blurred vision, mental confusion, and speech impairment. If someone becomes severely hypoglycemic and doesn't recover quickly, he or she might lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. If that happens, the person must get treated within 15 to 20 minutes; otherwise, he or she almost certainly will suffer devastating physical damage - possibly neuropathy, or blindness - or might even die. Because the risk of permanent neurological deficit increases as the coma is prolonged, it's important for people with diabetes to live no further than 20 minutes (known as the critical time) from their closest health center. Facility location problems such as this involve determining where to install resources and how to assign potential customers to those resources. Most studies on location problems are framed under deterministic conditions. Our proposed solution is more realistic. We adapted, implemented, and compared three metaheuristic strategies - scatter search, tabu search. and variable neighborhood search - to find the best locations in Spain's Burgos province to place health resources for treating people in diabetic comas. To check the efficiency of SS, TS, and VNS, we used instances of the well-known OR-Library as well as real data from the Burgos area in northern Spain. Using metaheuristics is a good option when the problem's complexity prevents us from using a commercially available solver to solve it exactly. This is especially true here, because we're considering hundreds of locations. View full abstract»

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  • The CKC Challenge: Exploring Tools for Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    Page(s): 64 - 68
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    A new generation of tools supports the integration of Web 2.0 and semantic Web approaches. Some of these tools-such as Semantic MediaWiki (http://meta.wikimedia. org/wiki/SemanticMediaWiki), BOWiki, (http://onto.eva. mpg.de/bowiki), and Platypus Wiki (http://platypuswiki. sourceforge.net)-provide wiki extensions for creating semantic links between pages. Other tools let users organize tags in some semantic structure, and fully fledged ontology editors such as pOWL support the distributed and collaborative development of ontologies. Commercial tools such as Freebase (http://freebase.com) are also entering the field. Most of these tools are in early development-the collaborative-knowledge-construction field is in its infancy. Few, if any, user studies outline what users expect from such tools and what does or doesn't work. So, we organized the collaborative knowledge construction challenge. The CKC challenge let users try different tools and provide feedback to help us assess the state of the art. View full abstract»

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  • GOLD: A Framework for Developing Intelligent-Vehicle Vision Applications

    Page(s): 69 - 71
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    To develop real-time vision applications for use in highly dynamic environments, such as automotive traffic, researchers must gather large amounts of data from different sensors and systems at different rates. Software capable of real-time data acquisition, synchronization, logging, and - ultimately - data processing and visualization is fundamentally important to improving researcher efficiency. The general obstacle and lane detection framework supports different devices and makes it easy to add new system functionalities. GOLD can easily become the engine for many automotive applications, and it could work in other application domains as well. View full abstract»

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  • The Procurement Woes Revisited

    Page(s): 72 - 75
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    The set of people who are frustrated every day by badly designed information technology is very large. So is the set of people whose dollars pay for the badly designed technology. A conservative estimate ranges in the billions for the cost of large-scale information systems that end up collecting dust because they're not properly human-centered. Yes, billions and still counting-that's the scary part. Within this large set of frustrated customers (see the sidebar "When Systems Development Neglects Human Considerations") is a subset whose job it is to do something about this situation. That subset includes policymakers, program managers, and systems engineers. It also includes a sub-subset comprising cognitive systems engineers, ethnographers, and many others who, in one vernacular or another, advocate human-centered computing. We must show that intelligent technologies-those designed to interact with humans or play a role in the cognitive work conducted in sociotechnical work systems-are usable, useful, and understandable. View full abstract»

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  • Near-Term Prospects for Semantic Technologies

    Page(s): 76 - 88
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    Tor the past few years, the Semantic Web has been enjoying significant investment, mostly through research but to a lesser extent through start-ups and commercial projects. A major topic of discussion is where we can see those investments' results, so I asked several experts to consider what semantic technology will accomplish in the near future. The experts are from academia, venture capitalist firms, and companies focused on semantic technology, telecommunication, and Web 2.0. View full abstract»

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  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): c3
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  • [Advertisement]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Intelligent Systems serves users, managers, developers, researchers, and purchasers who are interested in intelligent systems and artificial intelligence, with particular emphasis on applications.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Daniel Zeng
University of Arizona