By Topic

Software, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov. 1992

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Completing the job interface design

    Page(s): 11 - 22
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1728 KB)  

    HyperNews, a user-interface management system that lets a user separate application and interface design to link a new interface to an old application with very little programming, is described. Much of a HyperNews interface can be designed without writing any code at all. With direct manipulation, a user can design a graphical user interface simply by creating, moving, and resizing objects on the screen. Experimentation with different interface styles is possible with less effort in HyperNews compared to specification languages and tool kits, and immediate feedback can result in extremely fast development. The ways HyperNews provides communication capabilities among all HyperNews objects (such as control objects, cards, backgrounds, and stacks) and links interfaces to internal applications, which were developed within HyperNews, to external applications, or to existing applications developed without HyperNews are discussed.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Designing maintainable, reusable interfaces

    Page(s): 24 - 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1340 KB)  

    A conceptual framework, the Interaction Management Network (IMN), that captures the essential structure of any interface from task-oriented specification to object-oriented implementation is presented. IMN is essentially a task-oriented specification scheme based on a semantic network. For each element, as well as for the complete network, there is a direct representation suitable for object-oriented implementation. By capturing task relationships in the interface specification and explicitly representing constraints, designers can create interfaces that meet the often elusive user requirements. The application of IMN to creating an interface system for laying out floors is described.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Error reporting with graduated color

    Page(s): 33 - 38
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    A technique for nonintrusive error notification during programming that uses graduated color and elision, the temporary hiding of information, is described. Users can see errors and their age by the color and can look at the associated error explanation when they are not busy. Interruption is kept to a minimum during notification, and the explanation is close at hand and complete when it is wanted. The application of this technique to the Cornell synthesizer Generator is discussed, and sample generated displays are presented.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Porting multimedia applications to the Open System Environment

    Page(s): 39 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1480 KB)  

    To migrate DOS-based courseware to the Open System Environment (OSE), process creation and communication in Posix, a portable operating-system interface, were merged with a multilevel client-server architecture. This helped identify some problems that developers are likely to face when considering any operating-system or platform migration to the OSE. The OSE reference model is reviewed, and the proposed multilevel client-server software architecture developed to fully embody the DOS model in a distributed, portable OSE is outlined. The hardware and software of the interactive video delivery system used in the OSE are described.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Measuring dynamic program complexity

    Page(s): 48 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1124 KB)  

    A relative complexity technique that combines the features of many complexity metrics to predict performance and reliability of a computer program is presented. Relative complexity aggregates many similar metrics into a linear compound metric that describes a program. Since relative complexity is a static measure, it is expanded by measuring relative complexity over time to find a program's functional complexity. It is shown that relative complexity gives feedback on the same complexity domains that many other metrics do. Thus, developers can save time by choosing one metric to do the work of many.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Parallelism in object-oriented languages: a survey

    Page(s): 56 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1259 KB)  

    Fourteen concurrent object-oriented languages are compared in terms of how they deal with communication, synchronization, process management, inheritance, and implementation trade-offs. The ways in which they divide responsibility between the programmer, the compiler, and the operating system are also investigated. It is found that current object-oriented languages that have concurrency features are often compromised in important areas, including inheritance capability, efficiency, ease of use, and degree of parallel activity. Frequently, this is because the concurrency features were added after the language was designed. The languages discussed are Actors, Abd/1, Abd/R, Argus, COOL, Concurrent Smalltalk, Eiffel, Emerald, ES-Kit C++, Hybrid, Nexus, Parmacs, POOL-T, and Presto.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An environment for painless MIMD system development

    Page(s): 67 - 76
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1908 KB)  

    An environment that lets system applications be expressed as virtual machines, through which architecture-independent multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) programs are written, is described. The virtual machine hides the hardware configuration from the programmer so that the MIMD programming environment always appears the same, regardless of the actual hardware. The data-definition and procedural high-level languages used in the environment and the generation of object code in the environment are discussed. The runtime configuration of the system and an implemented prototype of the system are described.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Status report: computer-aided prototyping

    Page(s): 77 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (528 KB)  

    The application of prototyping, the construction and analysis of an executable model that approximates a proposed system, to software engineering is described. In the paper, the role of computer-aided prototyping in software development is assessed, the supporting technology necessary for prototyping to reach its potential is identified, and directions for future work are suggested.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • After Accolade: time for new laws? (reverse engineering)

    Page(s): 100 - 102
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (420 KB)  

    The debate concerning reverse engineering, decompilation and intermediate copying of software is reviewed. The effects of the Sega Enterprises vs. Accolade court case on this debate are discussed. It is argued that if computer professionals want to ensure that they will be able to continue to work in an environment that promotes innovation and the sharing of ideas, they must demand clear and well-thought-out intellectual-property laws for software and a judicial system capable of handling complex technical cases. They must also take an active role in the development of the laws under which they must work. Representative arguments from both side of the issue are presented in the form of selected quotes.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Process definition: theory and reality

    Page(s): 103 - 105
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (440 KB)  

    The approach taken by General Electric Aerospace to define the process it uses to develop and maintain software is outlined. It is shown that two major issues in process definition are deciding what information to include and what form of graphical representation to use. The lessons learned in developing and implementing this approach are discussed.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Software's mission is to build the community of leading and future software practitioners. The magazine delivers reliable, useful, leading-edge software development information to keep engineers and managers abreast of rapid technology change

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Diomidis Spinellis
Athens University of Economics and Business
28is Oktovriou 76
Athina 104 33, Greece
dds@computer.org