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Potentials, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • Front cover - IEEE Potentials

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents - Vol 26 No 6

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1
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  • RAB Student Activities Committee

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 2
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  • IEEE-USA Online video competition

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 4
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  • The way ahead

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 4
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Reflections of an engineer/science writer [essays]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 6 - 7
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Essays - Mass media 101: The AAAS mass media fellowship

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 7 - 9
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  • Letters to the editor

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 10
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  • New grade for students

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (633 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • GPUs surpass computers at repetitive calculations

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 12 - 23
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (560 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Major performance gains can be obtained by implementing computational intelligence algorithms on graphics processing units. However, a certain amount of skill is needed for the implementation; in some cases the performance gains can be as high as 200 times, but as low as two times or actually less than CPU operation. It is necessary to understand the limitations of the graphics processing hardware and to take these limitations into account in developing algorithms targeted at the GPU. It is important to note that all the examples in this document were operating on last-generation hardware. The next generation of graphics hardware is now available, and includes an order of magnitude more shader units per processor, as well as improved branching capabilities. Consider the possible capability of 512 programmable pipelines working in parallel at 1.5 GHz each, providing the amount of computing power previously seen in large supercomputers on a single desktop machine, at a fraction of the cost. These extremely powerful computing tools are now at the disposal of software designers for entertainment, scientific- computing, and computational intelligence applications. View full abstract»

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  • Agility counts in developing small-size software

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 16 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (750 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A common question in practice is "what are the circumstances in which agile methodologies should be adopted for more effective software development?" For instance, is the agile method suited for the development of modern industrial automation software? Actually this is a hard problem to address, and the right answer can be determined only by the requirements and constraints of each individual project. The size of projects in the industrial automation arena varies from small-size software with limited specific functionality to large-scale software systems with comprehensive functionality and rigorous requirements. A number of agilists are seeking ways to expand the use of agile methodologies for efficient development of larger software-intensive projects and effective management of distributed development teams. However, for safety-critical industrial automation software development, caution should be exercised in employing agile methodologies, as the detailed analysis of each software elements is needed and the system may have intense interactions with other software and hardware systems. View full abstract»

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  • Fighting terrorism with terahertz

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 24 - 29
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3568 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum is emerging as a powerful weapon in the war on terrorism and illicit drug trafficking. There is still much work to be done in developing the technology, but it shows an amazing ability to single out explosives, fertilizer bombs, chemical and biological agents, and narcotics by their characteristic transmission and reflection properties in the terahertz range. View full abstract»

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  • No-sag industrial power with DVRs

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 30 - 35
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1145 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Voltage sag is a relatively long-duration drop in line voltage. It is defined as a decrease between 0.1 and 0.9 per unit (pu) in alternating-current line voltage for durations of 0.5 cycles to 1 minute, where "per unit" is a fraction of the base voltage. The author compared the performance of a DVR and the more conventional shunt capacitors in mitigating voltage sag by simulation using PSCAD software. The paper also illustrates the effects of motor parameters on the sag during startup. View full abstract»

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  • Decongestants for clogged networks

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 36 - 41
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1138 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Interconnection networks are a key element in a wide variety of systems: massive parallel processors, local and system area networks, clusters of PCs and workstations, and Internet Protocol routers. They are essential to high performance in the form of high-bandwidth communications, with low latency, "quality of service" (guaranteed service levels), efficient switching, and flexibility of network topology, as embodied in Myrinet, InfiniBand, Quadrics, Advanced Switching, and similar interconnects. But, despite all the advances that modem interconnects offer, congestion is a growing problem as "lossless" interconnection networksrdquo those that do not allow data packets to be discarded" come to the fore. View full abstract»

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  • Autonomic communication learns from nature

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 42 - 46
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1412 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Autonomic communication focuses on distributed systems and management of network resources at both the infrastructure level and the user level. It is distinct from autonomic computing, which is more oriented toward application software and management of computing resources, although both share the same goals. Autonomic communication research probes into fundamental rethinking of communication, networking, and distributed computing paradigms, to deal with the complexities and dynamics of modern networks. Many researchers, including the authors, are looking to self-organization in nature - in colonies of insects, for example - for lessons they can apply to self-organizing autonomic communication networks. View full abstract»

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  • 2007 Student Activities Committee e-mail Addresses

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 47
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Gamesman solutions

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 47
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  • Gamesman problems

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 48
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  • Student healthcare coverage

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 49
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  • Internet television for technology professionals

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 50
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Potentials is the magazine dedicated to undergraduate and graduate students and young professionals.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
David Tian
Carnegie Mellon University
david.tian@ieee.org