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Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date Nov.-Dec. 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 22 of 22
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1 - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the Editor in Chief: All Systems Go

    Page(s): 3 - 5
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    In Part 1, the author reflected on the trouble IC had when encountering a submission that was substantially similar to another submission received elsewhere - a definite no-no. The author described some tools for detecting self-plagiarism and considered a possible way to get authors to make submitted works available alongside those already published, so that we could more easily detect overlapping submissions and other violations of submission guidelines. One key requirement would be that either the submissions themselves be stored and managed securely, with the same guarantees as submissions in the review process or that only some derived data be stored in a centralized fashion. In the latter case, we could readily tell that two manuscripts were similar without actually having access to either one: the arbitrator detecting the overlap wouldn't need to be trusted to protect the content, either. This arbitrator is an example of a broader class of neutral agents that can serve many functions on the Internet. In this article, the focuses on a second aspect of the reviewing process - reviewer integrity - and then return briefly to a few other real-world examples. View full abstract»

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  • The Long Tail Takes Over Music

    Page(s): 6 - 9
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    Former software developer and independent musician Jonathan Coulton has forged a following and a living wage by leveraging the Internet, and he's still pondering how the new business model for the music industry will emerge. However, the music business's very foundation is antithetical to long-tail economics. View full abstract»

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  • From the Newsstand

    Page(s): 10 - 12
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Social Media and Search

    Page(s): 13 - 15
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    The past few years have seen a rapid rise in social media Web sites. As user content becomes the dominant content form on the Web, various questions arise about the most effective approach to processing it. View full abstract»

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  • Social Information Processing in News Aggregation

    Page(s): 16 - 28
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    Social media sites underscore the Web's transformation to a participatory medium in which users collaboratively create, evaluate, and distribute information. Innovations in social media have led to social information processing, a new paradigm for interacting with data. The social news aggregator Digg exploits social information processing for document recommendation and rating. Additionally, via mathematical modeling, it's possible to describe how collaborative document rating emerges from the independent decisions users make. Using such a model, the author reproduces observed ratings that actual stories on Digg have received. View full abstract»

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  • Social Bookmarking for Scholarly Digital Libraries

    Page(s): 29 - 35
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    Social bookmarking services have recently gained popularity among Web users. Whereas numerous studies provide a historical account of tagging systems, the authors use their analysis of a domain-specific social bookmarking service called CiteULike to reflect on two metrics for evaluating tagging behavior: tag growth and tag reuse. They examine the relationship between these two metrics and articulate design implications for enhancing social bookmarking services. The authors briefly reflect on their own work developing a social bookmarking service for CiteSeer. View full abstract»

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  • Fighting Spam on Social Web Sites: A Survey of Approaches and Future Challenges

    Page(s): 36 - 45
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    In recent years, social Web sites have become important components of the Web. With their success, however, has come a growing influx of spam. If left unchecked, spam threatens to undermine resource sharing, interactivity, and openness. This article surveys three categories of potential countermeasures - those based on detection, demotion, and prevention. Although many of these countermeasures have been proposed before for email and Web spam, the authors find that their applicability to social Web sites differs. View full abstract»

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  • Centralized Web Proxy Services: Security and Privacy Considerations

    Page(s): 46 - 52
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    The widespread use of centrally controlled, externally run Web proxy services has several potential security issues related to privacy and deception, intranet information disclosure, and the creation of a single point of failure for widespread attacks. The author evaluates the security implications of such a Web proxy service from the viewpoints of users, organizations, and content providers. The discussion is illustrated with an analysis of Google's Web Accelerator, a free Web proxy service. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering Rich Internet Application User Interfaces over Legacy Web Models

    Page(s): 53 - 59
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    A steadily growing trend in Web applications is the development of user interfaces through rich Internet applications. Among other capabilities, RIAs offer high interactivity and native multimedia support, giving them a major advantage over standard HTML To update existing HTML Web applications, the authors propose the RUX-Model, which facilitates the user interface adaptation of existing Web 1.0 applications to Web 2.0. Their proposal focuses on new RIA capacities that exploit the data and business logic already provided in legacy Web models. View full abstract»

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  • SAWSDL: Semantic Annotations for WSDL and XML Schema

    Page(s): 60 - 67
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    Web services are important for creating distributed applications on the Web. In fact, they're a key enabler for service-oriented architectures that focus on service reuse and interoperability. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has recently finished work on two important standards for describing Web services the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) 2.0 and Semantic Annotations for WSDL and XML Schema (SAWSDL). Here, the authors discuss the latter, which is the first standard for adding semantics to Web service descriptions. View full abstract»

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  • The Road to Next-Generation Broadband

    Page(s): 68 - 71
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    Next-generation broadband promises to usher in a digital future in which it will be possible, for instance, to have a high-definition videoconference examination with your doctor from the comfort of your own home. Japan and Korea in particular are much closer to this sort of digital future than most countries, including the US. Public policy must play an important role in making tomorrow's broadband a reality in America. View full abstract»

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  • Live Distributed Objects: Enabling the Active Web

    Page(s): 72 - 78
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    Distributed computing has lagged behind the productivity revolution that has transformed the desktop in recent years. Programmers still generally treat the Web as a separate technology space and develop network applications using low-level message-passing primitives or unreliable Web services method invocations. Live distributed objects are designed to offer developers a scalable multicast infrastructure that's tightly integrated with a runtime environment. View full abstract»

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  • Reliability with Erlang

    Page(s): 79 - 81
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    In the previous issue, the author disclosed the concurrency features of Erlang, a programming language created at Ericsson more than 20 years ago for implementing telecommunications systems with stringent reliability, distribution, and uptime requirements. In this paper, the author explains that Erlang's concurrency primitives provide more than just a fast way to create threads. They also enable parts of an application to monitor other parts - even if they're running on separate hosts across the network - and restart those other parts should they fail. Erlang's libraries and frameworks take advantage of these capabilities to let developers build systems with extreme availability and reliability. View full abstract»

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  • Extending a Natural Language Interface with Geospatial Queries

    Page(s): 82 - 85
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    In this installation of architectural perspectives, we describe an extension of a menu-based natural language interface (MBNLI) to support geospatial queries. Our extension makes it easier for application analysts and even inexperienced users to phrase complex queries without knowing the relational database query language SQL, database schemas (table structures), spatial operators, or spatial indexes. View full abstract»

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  • The Future of Social Networks on the Internet: The Need for Semantics

    Page(s): 86 - 90
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    Everyone on the Internet knows the buzzword social networking. Social networking services (SNS) usually offer the same basic functionalities: network of friends listings, person surfing, private messaging etc. With such features, SNSs demonstrate how the Internet continues to better connect people for various social and professional purposes. The fundamental problems with today's SNSs block their potential to access the full range of available content and networked people online. A possible solution is to build semantic social networking into the fabric of the next-generation Internet itself-interconnecting both content and people in meaningful ways. The semantic Web is a useful platform for linking and for performing operations on diverse person-and object-related data gathered from heterogeneous social networking sites. In the other direction, object-centered networks can serve as rich data sources for semantic Web applications. View full abstract»

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  • SA-REST: Semantically Interoperable and Easier-to-Use Services and Mashups

    Page(s): 91 - 94
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    Services based on the representational state transfer (REST) paradigm, a lightweight implementation of a service-oriented architecture, have found even greater success than their heavyweight siblings, which are based on the Web Services Description Language (WSDL.) and SOAP. By using XML-based messaging, RESTful services can bring together discrete data from different services to create meaningful data sets; mashups such as these are extremely popular today. View full abstract»

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  • Google, Profiling, and Privacy

    Page(s): 95 - 96, c3
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    Antitrust questions put a useful spotlight on the privacy issues of online profiling by those who sell advertising on the Web. These questions apply not just to Google but to any site that uses personal information and behavior data to develop and use individual users' profiles. But simply assuring advertisers a fair marketplace won't be sufficient to guarantee user privacy. We know that many users are willing to give up some privacy protection for short-term convenience, but we shouldn't conclude from these chokes that privacy means the sum total of whatever people end up choosing. View full abstract»

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  • Annual index

    Page(s): i1 - i8
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): c4
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University