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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 10 • Date Oct. 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 23 of 23
  • Front cover - IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine

    Page(s): c1
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  • This Month 's Cover [IEEE AESS Pioneer Award for 2007 awarded to George M. Kirkpatrick]

    Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - Technically

    Page(s): 2
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  • The Business Case for System-Wide Information Management

    Page(s): 3 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5959 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In today's National Airspace System (NAS), when an application requires information from another application, a custom application-to-application interface is built. This results in an increasingly complex system, where applications are tightly coupled and expensive to develop and maintain. System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) addresses these shortfalls by implementing a shared infrastructure for managing NAS information. SWIM is based on a service-oriented architecture, a fast growing trend in information technology. It will help the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) meet the information-sharing needs of the Next Generation Air Traffic System (NGATS) and the federal government's E-government Initiative. SWIM will reduce the cost, complexity, and cycle time for building new applications and help the FAA implement SWIM-enabled applications that increase FAA and user productivity. View full abstract»

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  • ISS Random Power Failure Hardware Protection

    Page(s): 13 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3611 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Primary source of electric power for the International Space Station (ISS) is the photovoltaic (PV) module. At assembly complete stage, the ISS will be served by four PV modules. Each module contains two independent primary power channels such that one failure will result in loss of only one-half of the power generation capability. During the early stages of assembly, the ISS is served by only one PV module. Flight 12A brings one more module to the ISS and so on until the fourth module is installed during Flight 15A. Power channel components are arranged in orbit replaceable units (ORU) and repairs are accomplished by replacing the failed ORU. While a power channel is operating, all of its ORUs are maintained within their allowable temperature ranges by a balance between the heat generated and heat removed. Heat removal is accomplished either passively or by an active thermal control system (TCS), called photovoltaic thermal control system (PV TCS). The PV module P6 has been operating flawlessly since December 2000 with 100% power availability, as of this writing. This far exceeds the design goal and expectations. However, since a random failure may occur at anytime, the operators must be prepared to handle this situation. An ORU failure may result in dormancy of one or more ORUs; in the worst case, dormancy of all ORUs within one power channel and shutdown of the PV TCS for that power channel. Dormant ORUs may exceed their allowable temperature ranges and that may result in failure of additional ORUs. It is very important to ensure that all dormant, but otherwise operable ORUs remain within their allowable temperature ranges to prevent failure propagation. This describes how the dormant ORUs in the failed power channel will be thermally protected until replacement and restoration has been completed. These procedures use the following processes: (a) backfeed of primary power from another operating power channel, (b) supply of dc control power from the operating chan- nel on the same PV module, and (c) perform thermal control based on the monitored parameters. These procedures have been thoroughly coordinated by all affected technical teams and approved by all required boards. View full abstract»

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  • Next-Generation Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Page(s): 20 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3022 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Future spacecraft and high-altitude airship (HAA) solar array technologies will require high array specific power (W/kg), which can be met using thin-film photovoltaics (PV) on lightweight and flexible substrates [1]. Thin-film array technology, with thin-film specific array support structure, begin to exceed the specific power of crystalline multi-junction arrays with thin-film device efficiencies as low as 8.5% [2]. Thin-film PV devices have other advantages in that they are more easily integrated into HAAs, and are projected to be much less costly than their crystalline PV counterparts. Furthermore, it is likely that only thin-film array technology will be able to meet device specific power requirements exceeding 1 kW/kg (photovoltaic and integrated substrate/blanket mass only). View full abstract»

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  • Channel Measurement/Modeling for Airport Surface Communications: Mobile and Fixed Platform Results

    Page(s): 25 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3710 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We provide examples of measurement and modeling results for wireless channel characteristics around airport surface areas. This is done for three settings: two mobile settings and one non-mobile setting, in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System extension band. New findings, useful for communication system design in this environment, are reported. View full abstract»

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  • What Can GOLD Do for Me?

    Page(s): 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (544 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Page(s): 38
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  • From the Editor-in-Chief [Society News & Information]

    Page(s): 39
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  • Autotestcon 2008 - Call for Papers

    Page(s): 40
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  • Plagiarism Detection Service

    Page(s): 41
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  • RADAR 2008 - Call for Papers

    Page(s): 42
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  • Distinguished Tutorials Program

    Page(s): 43
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  • 2008 IEEE Radar Conference

    Page(s): 44
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  • Distinguished Lecturers Program

    Page(s): 45
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  • Responding to objections

    Page(s): 46
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  • The Benefits of Membership

    Page(s): 47
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  • IEEE 2007 IEEE AEROSPACE AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS SOCIETY MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

    Page(s): 48
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS Personnel

    Page(s): 49
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  • AESS Meetings & Conferences

    Page(s): 50
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  • MEMs for Aerospace Navigation

    Page(s): 31 - 36
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3093 KB)  

    The MEMS aerospace market has its own specificities in terms of market size, standards, and performance characteristics (very long term stability, reliability, and safety levels). Improvements are needed for future applications. THALES Avionics has a twenty-year experience in quartz and silicon MEMS design and manufacturing and is recognized as a leader by the French MOD in this field. MEMS pressure sensors and accelerometers are manufactured in large volume and used for safety-critical applications. THALES technology policy focused on planar architecture, die vacuum packaging, and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) allowing good characteristics for sensors in development. A Silicon Vibrating Beam Accelerometer single chip is now under development. Its operating principle is described with two resonators in push-pull configuration. A tuning fork planar rate gyro is also developed with exactly the same technology for industrial efficiency. Performance results will be addressed. The development and industrialization road-map of theses inertial products is described for the following five years. Gyro-compassing grade inertial sensors would be available during the next decade allowing low-cost, high-grade navigators using simultaneously GNSS receivers and inertial MEMS navigators. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
(407) 450-0929 (BB)
tpace@sentech.dsci.com