System Maintenance Notice:
Single article purchases and IEEE account management are currently unavailable. We apologize for the inconvenience.
By Topic

Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 1975

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (73 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (159 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Nucleus

    Page(s): 833
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (68 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Recent Developments in Air Particulate Monitoring

    Page(s): 849 - 855
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1500 KB)  

    During the past 50 years, man has become acutely aware of the air pollution pervading our environment. Thus he has focused a considerable amount of scientific study on the chemical and physical properties of gaseous and particulate contaminants. A key element in the classification of particulate pollution is the sampling procedure used to collect particles, with the emphasis on separating the respirable from the non-respirable fraction. Generally, impaction techniques have been utilized for size collection of particulates, but these procedures can be affected by the nature of the impaction collection technique which can cause the particles to bounce from one stage to the next, particularly when larger sample quantities are desired for chemical analysis and gravimetrics. Recently EPA, working with several other investigators, perfected a dichotomous collection device, based on virtual impaction principles, which separates and collects particles into two size ranges, 0 to 3.5 microns and 3.5 to 20 microns. Particle bounce at the collection surface is not a problem with this sampler because particles are captured by filtration. The operation and design of manual and automated virtual impactors are discussed. In addition, the application of x-ray fluorescence to the analysis of particulates collected with the dichotomous sampler is described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Methods for the Determination of Inorganic Constituents in Water

    Page(s): 870 - 873
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (755 KB)  

    Methods used for determining inorganic constituents in natural waters have undergone considerable change in the last decade. A majority of metal constituents are now determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Various chelation and extraction procedures when used with AAS have lowered the detection limits to the microgram-per-liter range for many metal constituents. Aeration techniques have been developed which utilize AAS to determine such constituents as mercury, arsenic, and selenium. Vaporization techniques using graphite furnaces and similar devices linked with atomic absorption spectrophotometers provide for still lower detection limits and greater simplicity. These vaporization procedures require more research to limit interferences before they can be widely applied to the mass analysis of natural waters. Automated equipment is routinely used to analyze water samples. Colorimetric procedures have proven most useful but several potentiometric methods have recently been developed which also adapt themselves well to an automated approach. A procedure for determining fluoride using a potentiometric method has proven especially beneficial. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer has been joined with sampler and proportioning pump modules to produce automated determinations. Further potential development of the already mentioned instrumental techniques as well as anodic stripping voltammetry, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, and mass spectroscopy are described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Methods for the Determination of Specific Organic Pollutants in Water and Waste Water

    Page(s): 874 - 891
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3049 KB)  

    This paper reviews methods for sample collection and pretreatment and for isolation and determination of specific organic compounds with emphasis on methods for determination. Methods for organochlorine, organophosphorus, and organonitrogen pesticides and phenoxy acid herbicides are presented. Methods for the determination of other chlorinated organics such as polychlorinated biphenyls, organic solvents, and other selected organic compounds are also presented. Gas chromatography is the most widely applicable and popular method for detecting and measuring specific organic compounds in water, waste water, and other environmental media. When coupled with selective detectors, gas chromatography becomes the most sensitive and selective method for qualitative and quantitative determination of organic compounds that is available. The recent development and application of the computer-controlled gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer adds a much needed extra dimension to organic analysis, that of unequivocal identification of compounds that can be only tentatively identified by other means. Gas chromatographic methods are selectively applied either directly on the raw sample or after concentration by adsorption or solvent extraction and evaporation. A variety of other determinative methods such as infrared, ultraviolet, and fluorescent spectroscopy; liquid chromatography; and thin-layer chromatography have application in the broad spectrum of organic analysis. Selected examples of the application of these methods are presented. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Drift Chamber Application in High Energy Physics

    Page(s): 892 - 895
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2396 KB)  

    We review the use of drift chambers in the field of High Energy Physics: existing apparatus, plans and ... dreams. We comment especially on low cost large area drift chambers, use of pulse height information and high spatial resolution applications. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Line-Scanning Proportional Counter Camera

    Page(s): 896 - 900
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3845 KB)  

    A new method was developed for imaging spatial distributions of photons, charged particles, or neutrons over large areas by a line-scanning camera. This camera uses a linear position-sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) based on resistance-capacitance (RC) position encoding. 1-6 Applications of this camera include low-dose, medium-resolution radiography of large objects (>2 by 2 m); and, in nuclear medicine, low-dose, whole-body radionuclide imaging and radiography with low energy photons (<150keV). A prototypic camera was built and tested to scan an area of 60 by 100 cm. The spatial resolution is 1 by 1 mm fwhm for radiography with 60-keV photons and 3 by 3 mm fwhm for radionuclide imaging with 50-keV photons (limited by collimator resolution). Compared to point-by-point scanning, the line-scanning method reduces the mechanical complexity of the camera and eliminates problems encountered in construction of large-area, high pressure PSPCs. This method is superior to the area PSPC for imaging objects >60 by 60cm. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Formation of the Pulse-Height Spectrum of Diamond Detectors Irradiated with Electrons

    Page(s): 901 - 902
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (244 KB)  

    The pulse-height spectrum of the diamond detectors irradiated with conversion electrons from 109Cd source (Eo=84keV) is calculated. The energy losses of electrons are taken into account with the help of an empirical expression that connects the range with the energy. The comparison with experimental data allowed to estimate the parameter of the detictor material, i.e. the value NS = 10-4 cm-1. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Power Plant Dynamics, Control and Testing

    Page(s): 903 - 904
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (346 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 904a
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (294 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Affiliate Plan of the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society

    Page(s): 904-b
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (86 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science focuses on all aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Paul Dressendorfer
11509 Paseo del Oso NE
Albuquerque, NM  87111  USA