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Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date April 1969

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Nuclear Science Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • The Nucleus

    Page(s): 1
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  • A Versatile Gamma-Ray Camera for Dynamic or Static Studies in Medicine

    Page(s): 3 - 18
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    The design of a medical ¿ ray camera for use in the isotope energy range 150-400 keV is described. It is based on the use of image-intensifiers, yields 1000 picture element definition, and provides discrimination against Compton scatter and other spurious signals. The present camera will accept 30,000 photopeak events/sec, but this is not an ultimate limit. Thus the instrument is well suited to both static and dynamic studies. View full abstract»

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  • Primary Stabilization of a 1 MeV Electron Accelerator

    Page(s): 19 - 26
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    Chromatic aberration is a major obstacle in the attempt to achieve near atomic resolution in electron microscopes. In analogy to dispersion of colors in a glass lens, nonuniform velocities of the illuminating electrons will reduce the resolution of an electron microscope lens. Instability of the accelerating potential is an important cause of these nonuniformities. To achieve resolution on the order of 1 to 5 Å, accelerating voltage must be stable to approximately 3 parts per million. To achieve these resolutions, a highly stabilized 1 MeV linear electron accelerator was developed. One of its two 15 in. (38 cm) accelerating tubes will provide a velocity stabilized electron beam source for a high resolution electron microscope. Electron acceleration occurs through a constant potential divider. A Van de Graaff type charge carrying pellet string provides the accelerating voltage. The primary or coarse control system for the linear electron accelerator compares the high voltage terminal voltage as detected with an accurate voltage divider to a reference cell voltage. Error signals are amplified to control the voltage on a capacitive liner. Control is accomplished by a voltage control of the cylindrical capacitive liner surrounding the high voltage terminal. The low frequency fluctuations in accelerator voltage maintained by this primary loop are less than 0.1% to permit utilization of a fine control loop with a spectrometer beam analysis control to achieve fine voltage stability of 3 parts per million. View full abstract»

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  • Field Distribution in a Centrally Loaded Circular Cylindrical Cavity

    Page(s): 27 - 34
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    To accelerate protons in an Alvarez type linear accelerator or electrons in velocity modulated tubes, the cavity must be excited in the dominant TM010 mode. For proper understanding of beam dynamics and for purposes of design, the r.f. fields must be computed accurately for any specified dimensions of the drift space. In this paper the exact numerical solution for the fields in a drift tube loaded linear accelerator cavity with a beam guiding hole is presented. The eigenvalues, field distribution, transit time factor and the shunt impedance are formulated everywhere by boundary value techniques in the same manner as proposed by Bolle and Gluckstern in the absence of the beam guiding hole. The numerical results are obtained with the aid of a digital computer and are established by an excellent agreement with an experiment based on perturbation techniques. View full abstract»

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  • The Pulse Shape and the Timing Problem in Solid State Detectors - A Review Paper

    Page(s): 35 - 61
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    In this paper a survey is presented of the theoretical and experimental data obtained in the last eight years about both the shape of the pulses supplied by semiconductor detectors and the techniques for obtaining from these pulses a fast timing information. Moreover the problem is considered of extracting from the shape of the pulse some information on the type or the impact angle of the detected radiation. View full abstract»

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  • Variations in Single Photon Pulse Height Distribution with Focusing Voltage in Photomultipliers

    Page(s): 62 - 64
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    In photomultipliers the focusing voltage which gives the most peaked distribution is also the one which results in the largest count rate. For low focusing voltage there is a significant loss in single-photon events. The results of this experiment are consistent with the idea that the pulse distribution depends upon variations in the effective secondary emission ratio. View full abstract»

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  • Nuclear Power Plant Technology

    Page(s): 65
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 66 - 68
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 68a
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  • Affiliate Plan of the IEEE Nuclear Science Group

    Page(s): 68-b
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Aims & Scope

IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science focuses on all aspects of the theory and applications of nuclear science and engineering, including instrumentation for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation; particle accelerators and their controls; nuclear medicine and its application; effects of radiation on materials, components, and systems; reactor instrumentation and controls; and measurement of radiation in space.

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