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Education, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1961

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Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Education

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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 47
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  • Today's Dilemma in Engineering Education

    Page(s): 48 - 50
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    The present wide-scale activity to increase the science content of engineering curricula can, if not skillfully accomplished, result in the teaching of science, and not the engineering of science, to engineers. The changes experienced in the substance of the curricula are sometimes so great that faculties encounter great difficulty in providing worthwhile engineering examples to support their presentations of engineering science. View full abstract»

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  • Programmed learning in engineering education-a preliminary study

    Page(s): 51 - 58
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    A recent study of programmed learning, including experimental use in an electrical engineering department, indicated that the most fruitful application of teaching machine methods is in the presently nonprogrammed or loosely programmed hours spent by students outside classroom or laboratory periods. Programs already developed for use in this study have been concerned with analytical skills; further programs under development are concerned with concepts. Larger scale experiments are planned in which additional questions can be answered, particularly as to whether exposure to programmed instruction adversely affects the capacity of the student to learn independently. View full abstract»

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  • TV Production Techniques and Teaching Efficiency

    Page(s): 59 - 61
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    Educators who venture into the realm of television immediately encounter this question: What equipment is required, and what can be done with it? This paper attempts to provide some basis for an intelligent answer. In designing the research from which this report derived, attention was focused upon basic television production techniques. A series of instructional segments were produced utilizing these techniques; a second series was subsequently produced with the same instructors and subject matter, but with more elaborate techniques. The two series were then presented for viewing by various student audiences. A control group viewed the first series; an experimental group was shown the second series. Preliminary knowledge of subject matter was determined by a pre-test; degree of learning and retention were measured by an immediate posttest, and a delayed post-test. Those data were then analyzed by means of standard statistical instruments. In collating and appraising the obtained results it was apparent that a one camera production, with true flat lighting, utilizing close-up camera coverage and a modicum of technical skill and imagination, was as effective as the more elaborate production in ordinary lecture-teaching situations. View full abstract»

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  • An Experiment in Laboratory Education

    Page(s): 62 - 66
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    A departure from traditional forms of undergraduate laboratory education has been incorporated into the electrical engineering curriculum at Syracuse University. In this paper is presented a summary of the reasons for this innovation, a description of the course, and an evaluation of our experiences with it. As curricula in electrical engineering become more science centered, it is essential that the undergraduate engineering laboratory take as its prime objective the development of skills requisite to the planning and execution of meaningful experiments and the promotion of an understanding of the relationships between theory and experiment. Briefly, the objective is an education in the experimental aspects of scientific method. This objective has not been well served in the past by the traditional laboratories. Too frequently, student motivation has been poor enough to limit substantially the learning process, and the typical experiment was not likely to afford an opportunity for education in science. To attempt to fulfill the objectives stated, a separate course in laboratory was initiated. The separation of the laboratory from its traditionally dependent role was expected to permit greater freedom in the technical content of the course and to emphasize the importance of the laboratory to science. The plan of the course was inspired by the belief that motivation, the prime force in the learning process, is determined in part by the significance of the experiments the student is asked to perform, and that an education in science can be obtained only by the exercise of its method. View full abstract»

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  • The Computer Revolution in Engineering Education

    Page(s): 67 - 70
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    The ready availability of high-speed digital computers has wrought a fundamental and unprecented change in engineering education. Described herein are one university's experiences with a small digital computer, on which thousands of undergraduates have been taught to program within the past year. A new approach to the teaching and administration of computers is required, as is a new approach to almost every aspect of the engineering curriculum. The shape of things to come is briefly examined. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering Education in Canada and the Cooperative Electrical Engineering Program at the University of Waterloo

    Page(s): 71 - 79
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    Although cooperative engineering is practiced at several universities in the United States, that at the University of Waterloo is unique in Canada. The baccalaureate program requires five years of continual attendance, during which the student spends alternate three-month periods in school and in industry. A distinctive feature of the plan is the maintenance of a Coordination Department within the University organization. Staffed by senior professional engineers, this department acts as liaison between industry and the students. Two programs of study are offered in the undergraduate electrical engineering curriculum. One of these is designed for the heavy electromechanical and power systems engineer. The other embraces electronics, communication and computery disciplines, with a greater concentration of theoretical studies. Although the University is still in its infancy, both industrial and student acceptance of the cooperative plan has exceeded initial expectations. There is every indication that co-operative engineering education will rapidly assume a dominant role in the Canadian academic scene. View full abstract»

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  • Letter to the Editor

    Page(s): 79
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 80 - 81
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  • Institutional listings

    Page(s): 81a
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production on 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Education.

Full Aims & Scope