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Education, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1960

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Education

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Evaluation Report on the New York City Academic High School Program in Physics

    Page(s): 31 - 35
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    The physics syllabus being offered in the academic high schools of New York City has aroused considerable interest as to its value as prerequisite to baccalaureate programs in science and engineering. To gather certain facts, the Engineering Advisory Committee was organized, comprised of members selected from the New York Metropolitan sections of the professional engineering societies. The members visited numerous schools to arrive at a broad appraisal of high-school physics as a pre-engineering preparation. They inspected class schedules, laboratory facilities and libraries. They examined laboratory schedules, textbooks in use, teaching load assignments, and procedures for ordering laboratory equipment. They evaluated the qualifications of teachers and methods for motivating gifted students. Their findings are described in this report which includes a listing of recommendations. View full abstract»

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  • A Look at the New Electrical Engineering Laboratory Program at the Hopkins

    Page(s): 36 - 41
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    The undergraduate electrical engineering program at The Johns Hopkins University has undergone extensive revision. The most striking revision has been in the laboratory program. Laboratory courses which are distinct from the lecture courses have been developed. These laboratory courses embrace the fields of basic and advanced electrical measurements, transducers, passive circuits, active networks, communications, microwaves, materials, computers, servomechanisms, and energy conversion. The experiments in each one of these fields are designed to give the student insight into both the basic and advanced concepts involved. The sequence of presentation of the experiments is chosen to allow the most complete coverage of a subject as possible, based on the order in which the electrical engineering lecture courses are taken. The use of laboratory manuals, notebooks, reports, and examinations has been given careful thought and some significant ideas have been evolved with regard to their use in establishing a successful laboratory course. View full abstract»

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  • Linear Graph Theory-A Fundamental Engineering Discipline

    Page(s): 42 - 49
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    Current techniques for formulating the mathematical characteristics of physical systems vary greatly from one type to another (mechanical, electrical, thermal, etc.). Of these techniques, those used in electrical network analysis have proven to be the more orderly and generally applicable as evidenced by repeated efforts on the part of the system analyst to establish first an electrical analog of the system in question. This paper presents the basis of an operational concept of system analysis embracing all types of systems, and presents an orderly, sure, and relatively simple basis for extending the discipline of linear graph theory (abstracted form of network theory) to the analysis and synthesis of all types of lumped-parameter systems without the artifice of analogies. It is indicated that these procedures and concepts also provide a means for extending electrical network theory beyond current applications to include systems of multiterminal components. View full abstract»

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  • Part-Time Graduate Electrical Engineering Program in the San Francisco Bay Area

    Page(s): 49 - 52
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    The San Francisco Bay area has been rapidly growing in size and stature as one of the national centers of the electronics industry. In particular, the growth has been in companies and laboratories with a strong emphasis on research and development, in contrast to volume production. Such industry needs and seeks opportunities for graduate education for its engineers. The manner in which such opportunities have developed in the San Francisco area, especially at Stanford where the great majority of the part-time students are enrolled, provides an interesting example of how the needs of industry can be served within the academic objectives of an educational institution which serves primarily the full-time day student. View full abstract»

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  • The Functional Context Method of Instruction

    Page(s): 52 - 57
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    This is a discussion of a method of instruction designed to replace conventional methods for training radio repairmen. In traditional radio repair instruction, basic electronics has been taught as a block of instruction preceding instruction on intact equipment and maintenance operations. This approach is criticized for its failure to provide the student with meaningful and relevant contexts for the learning of basic electronics and for the obstacles it presents to the assimilation of basic electronics knowledge into maintenance skills. A new approach, entitled the functional context method, is offered as a means for avoiding these shortcomings. This is accomplished through a topic sequence wherein basic electronics is taught in the broader contexts of over-all equipment functions and maintenance operations. View full abstract»

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  • An Alarmist View of Engineering College Enrollment

    Page(s): 58 - 62
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    Engineering college enrollment is in some measure a response to the demand for trained people. The forecasting of enrollment may thus be improved if it is based upon trends in the demand for trained people. One way to measure these trends, which does not seem to have been explored, comes from consideration of the membership in technical societies. The trends found in this way are very marked. The over-all rate of growth so indicated is exponential and is about 7 1/2 per cent per year. The indicated growth rate in electrical engineering is much greater than in any of the other major subdivisions of engineering except chemical engineering. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 63
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  • Announcement 1960 Special Summer Session

    Page(s): 64
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  • Institutional listings

    Page(s): 64a
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production on 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Education.

Full Aims & Scope