By Topic

Education, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1960

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 12 of 12
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (50 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Education

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (87 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Editorial

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (131 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • The Research Flavor

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (441 KB)  

    Research should be made a significant part of undergraduate engineering education in order to orient the student toward the solving of new problems. He should learn of the frontiers of his field of study, and should know of the people who are pushing back these frontiers. An increase is needed in the number of courses designed for guiding a student to define problems, to make assumptions, to search for his own methods of solving them, and to develop a way to report his findings. Almost as a dividend, new ideas and the exercise of originality provide a strong motivation to learning. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Scientific Manpower Shortage and Its Implications for the Engineering Technician

    Page(s): 3 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1830 KB)  

    Some of the background of the present scientific manpower shortage is reviewed. Utilization as an important aspect of engineer efficiency is discussed. With this setting, the engineering technician's complementary function with the engineer is introduced. The limited availability of technicians is cited. A discussion of the stepping-stone aspect of the technician job, an area worth consideration because of its ramifications, is presented and the concept of a four-year program for engineering technicians is shown to have significant value in coping with several phases of technician training. Four areas of study and investigation are suggested that can contribute to solution of the overall need of increased scientific manpower through increased utilization. Utilization would be improved by the proper preparation of an adequate number of engineering technicians. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Circuit Analysis-A Problem in Semantics

    Page(s): 10 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1262 KB)  

    The teaching-learning process in circuits is enormously complicated by the multiple meanings and shades of meanings which are inherent in most of the technical terms. A method is offered for reducing every term relating to "functions" to its basic meaning for the particular circuit application under study. Using this method, which might be called "current analysis," it becomes possible to explain detailed circuit phenomena to students with little or no technical or mathematical background. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A General Course in Traveling Waves

    Page(s): 15 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1069 KB)  

    Traveling waves must be considered whenever the time for a disturbance to propagate from one place to another is important. A course with this as its theme has been developed to replace the usual course in transmission lines or distributed constant circuits. Emphasis is placed on the transmission line as a teaching vehicle, but plane waves in space; vibrating strings and membranes; acoustic waves in gases, liquids and solids; heat conduction; and chemical diffusion are also treated. The analogies between the "telegraphers' equations" and comparable equations describing nonelectrical phenomena are stressed. Transients are treated for two special cases: 1) lossless lines and acoustics, and 2) diffusion and heat transfer. Steady state analysis using phasors and the Smith Chart is applied to plane electromagnetic and acoustic waves at all angles of incidence, as well as to the transmission line. Spherical acoustic waves are treated briefly. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A First Course in Electrical Engineering

    Page(s): 19 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (685 KB)  

    This article describes the introductory two-semester course in electrical engineering that has been developed over a period of five years at Princeton University. The aims of the course are to provide an introduction to the field of electrical engineering via the basic concepts of electricity and magnetism (which are developed through Maxwell's equations in the integral form), to apply these concepts in developing the fundamentals of energy conversion and circuit theory, and to carry forward, in a continuous and integrated way, a modern treatment of network analysis. Thus, the treatment proceeds from field ideas to circuits and physical apparatus, and to their mathematical models. With the circuit relations formulated, attention turns to the analysis of networks, starting with network topology and extending through pole-zero ideas. The treatment stops just short of the Laplace transform. This course is intended to serve as a foundation for subsequent courses such as electronic circuits, energy conversion, and advanced network analysis and synthesis, and has been developed with the purpose of providing the student with a unifying point of view for these varied topics. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Organization of a Laboratory Electronics Course

    Page(s): 22 - 25
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2759 KB)  

    This paper describes the organization of a Laboratory Electronics Course in the Department of Aircraft Electrical Engineering at the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield, England. The course caters to two standards of specialization and to students with a wide range of previous training. The minor specialization course concentrates solely on fundamentals and the basic concepts, while the major course is carried to the threshold of design procedures. The contents of both courses are limited by the student's previous training and the time available for practical work. The over-all standard of the major course is that of the M.Sc. degree of a British University. Four different ways of construction and presentation of experiments are described and the limitations of each are discussed. Finally, the laboratory layout, equipment, and scheme of work for both courses is described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Supplementary DC Machine Test for Sophomores

    Page(s): 25 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (777 KB)  

    A blocked-rotor test may be used to determine curves for a family of dynamic operating characteristics for dc machines. Conventional performance characteristics may be predicted from these curves. The authors have used this test procedure to supplement the usual tests on machinery in the sophomore laboratory. The new procedure emphasizes the fundamental principles of machine operation and also points up the importance of certain details which have a significant effect upon performance. The test would logically precede the usual load tests. The latter are then anticipated with enthusiasm since they provide confirmation of performance predicted from the static tests. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contributors

    Page(s): 29 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (2052 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institutional listings

    Page(s): 30a
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (44 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production on 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Education.

Full Aims & Scope