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Education, IRE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Sept. 1959

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IRE Professional Group on Education

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An Engineering Experiment in Industry-Community-School Relations

    Page(s): 113 - 116
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    The engineering experiment described here was spearheaded by a group of IRE Members who were convinced that the attitude of their communities on matters of science education could be influenced. In this project, ten high schools and over 40 industrial and scientific organizations joined in a series of supervised field trips by 400 selected high-school students. The program culminated in a three-day industrial exhibit which was viewed by approximately 25,000 visitors of all ages. Details on how this was organized as a community project are given. View full abstract»

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  • Physics Courses in the New Arizona Engineering Curriculum

    Page(s): 117 - 120
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    To facilitate the adoption of a common core curriculum in the Schools of Engineering and of Mining at the University of Arizona, the general physics course for engineers has been dropped. The physical foundation for engineering is taught in a new series of courses in the Civil, Mechanical, Electrical Engineering, and Physics Departments as part of the common core. The Physics Department teaches atomic, molecular, nuclear, and solid-state physics in a seven-unit junior-level course. There are grounds for a re-examination of the role of physics in engineering education and perhaps for extensive changes. It is suggested, however, that the role is, and should remain, vital, in the interests of science, of engineering, and of education. View full abstract»

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  • Laboratory: Its Scope and Philosophy

    Page(s): 120 - 122
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    Some of the problems, methods, and philosophies of teaching laboratory are reviewed. Laboratory furnishes one channel by which knowledge can be acquired, supplements other teaching methods, and is particularly useful where mathematical descriptions are imperfect. In addition, laboratory deals with precision measurement, data recording, development of mechanical aptitude, and learning of specific techniques. Coordination of laboratory with other work usually follows one of two conflicting principles. A laboratory course may be conducted in a rigid manner or in a highly individualistic, flexible way. Each has its advantages. Laboratory provides good practice for report writing. By requiring at least one formal paper per student on laboratory work performed, a more realistic introduction to report writing is secured than in any other course work. View full abstract»

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  • A Course in Engineering Analysis for Superior Students

    Page(s): 122 - 124
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    As a part of the expanding honors group program for superior students, a course in Engineering Analysis using the assistance of engineers from cooperating industry has been evolved. The selection of students, the orientation part of the course, the selection of problems from industry, and a discussion of the results are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Elementary Introduction to Electrodynamics

    Page(s): 124 - 128
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    Objectionable examples of time-varying electromagnetic fields occurring in elementary textbooks are pointed out and the difficulties arising in connection with them are discussed. The interdependence of spatial and time variations of the electromagnetic fields is recalled. As an illustration, two simple examples are given to show how the variation of fields with time is automatically determined by the wave equation and initial spatial distribution. It is suggested that only fields which satisfy the wave equation be used in textbooks. View full abstract»

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  • A Combined Machinery and Control Systems Laboratory

    Page(s): 128 - 134
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    This paper shows how, in the interest of emphasizing the systems concept, rotating machines have been integrated into a systems laboratory. Small machines provide the mechanical flexibility necessary in the emphasis of the systems concept, yet essential machine characteristics are retained. The paper also demonstrates how machine characteristics are interpreted to provide information for the analysis for an electromechanical system which includes the machine as a component. View full abstract»

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  • A Realistic Program in Energy Processing

    Page(s): 134 - 138
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    A general revision of the undergraduate curriculum in electrical engineering at Case Institute of Technology served as the stimulus and foundation for an updating of the course content in the area previously occupied by rotating machinery. The series of three courses which resulted has now been tested in the classroom for appropriateness, unity, depth of coverage possible, and palatability to the student. This paper reports the content and achievements of this initial trial. Results of the past year indicate that the material presented is pedagogically sound and that the program is realistic for the undergraduate student. View full abstract»

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  • Energy Conversion and Control at Berkeley

    Page(s): 138 - 142
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    The recent developments in this area in terms of curricular changes in the Electrical Engineering program have been described and evaluated. A previous required course, which covered electric machinery in some detail, has been replaced by a more general course which studies the principles of electromechanical energy conversion and the control of the flow of electrical energy by both static and motional devices. In addition, a new experimental two-semester course has been developed which integrates the study of energy conversion and control devices into a study of systems and the role of these devices in meeting system specifications. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 143 - 144
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production on 1963. The current retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Education.

Full Aims & Scope