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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 4 • Date Dec. 1965

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Education Group

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): c2
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  • A Course in Creative Problem Solving

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 85 - 90
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1367 KB)  

    This paper briefly describes a three credit-hour undergraduate senior-level course, Creative Problem Solving, which has been taught for four years in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Florida. Particular emphasis is placed on the techniques found successful for teaching a course in engineering creativity, since knowledge of such techniques has constituted a deterrent to many desiring to teach such a course. The purposes and typical examples of classroom and outside activities are presented. The activities deliberately contain strong student participation both individually and in small groups. The course described seeks to impart to students a workable approach to the technique of solving complex engineering problems. It simultaneously orients and develops the students' attitudes toward recognition of the role played by creativity in actual engineering problem solving. Though the present course is oriented toward electrical engineers, it is believed that the essential methodology used could, with some modifications, be adapted to other undergraduate engineering disciplines. An attempt is made to appraise the effectiveness of the overall course. Some of the unsolved teaching problems are also exposed. View full abstract»

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  • A Simplified Approach to Instruction in Saturable Reactors and Magnetic Amplifiers

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 91 - 93
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    This paper intends to cast new light on some problems that hamper beginners when studying saturable reactor performance. It is not easy to explain to students why the mean value of the current must be zero for a nonlinear circuit having a characteristic resembling that of a rectifier. In addition, it is hard to grasp at initial stages how direct current can be "transformed" from the control to the power circuit. These problems and many others are easily explainable taking into account the fact that in steady state the mean value of the voltage across the coil of a saturable reactor must be zero. View full abstract»

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  • An Introduction to the Rudiments of Tensor Analysis

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 94 - 106
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    The notion of a tensor is developed in terms presumed familiar to the reader; tensors are shown to be a natural outgrowth and extension of vectors and matrices. The paper begins with an elementary discussion of affine vector spaces in a way which presupposes no prior contact with linear algebra on the part of the reader. The notions of the contravariant and covariant components of a vector are introduced early and the vector is characterized as a tensor of rank one so that the reader may readily generalize the results to tensors of higher ranks. Roughly, the discussion is divided into two major headings, Tensor Algebra and Tensor Analysis; a brief introduction to differential geometry (where tensor analysis achieves its greatest power and beauty) is included under the latter heading. View full abstract»

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  • On the Convolution Integral

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 107 - 109
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    Engineers are becoming more aware of the usefulness of convolution in solving engineering problems. The methods used to explain and motivate convolution in the past are not adequate to instill in the student the value of convolution. This paper poses the problems associated with the present teaching methods and suggests other approaches and examples which can be used to accomplish the desired goal. View full abstract»

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  • The Classical Dynamics Approach to Connected Electromechanical Systems

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 109 - 118
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    In this paper, the classical dynamics methods of Hamilton and Lagrange are used to give a systematic treatment of connected electromechanical systems. View full abstract»

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  • A General Network Representation for Three-Terminal Active Devices

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 119 - 124
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    Using the properties of the redundant admittance matrix described by Shekel, it is possible to develop a general network representation for an active three-terminal device. In the course of the analysis, the unilateral admittance is developed. This element, which represents part of the active nature of a three-terminal device, may be treated as a passive element when writing circuit equations. The general representation is identical for both vacuum tubes and transistors. View full abstract»

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  • On the Form of the Phase Response Curve for a Single Real Pole or Zero

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 125 - 129
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    The mathematical description of the phase response of a single real pole or zero on a logarithmic frequency basis is shown not to be "the familiar arctangent curve," but of the form y=arctan ¿x or, by shift of ordinate, Y=arctan tanh x/2. The difference between the arctangent and these functions on a normalized basis is found to be in excess of 15 percent. The best straight-line approximation for phase shift is determined as intersecting the 0° and 90° values at 0.0970 and 10.315 times the corner frequency, so that the often used "one-tenth and ten-times" straight-line approximation is confirmed as being extremely good for practical purposes. View full abstract»

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  • A Space-Limited Construction for the Smith Chart

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 130 - 131
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (483 KB)  

    Smith chart conversion of complex numbers from rectangular form to polar form, and vice versa, often involves the construction of one or more constant magnitude circular arcs. If the magnitude is being sought, it is frequently necessary to resort to graphical interpolation between the arcs. In any event, should the magnitude, given or desired, be between approximately one-fourth and four, the centers of the constant magnitude arcs inconveniently lie off the conventional Smith chart. This paper presents geometric methods with brief proofs for keeping all magnitude constructions on the commercial chart and for increasing the accuracy of results by referring interpolations to the accurately printed scalings on the horizontal axis. View full abstract»

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  • Potential Drops in Metal-Dielectric-Semiconductor Capacitors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 131 - 136
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    During the past few years many of the recent developments in the semiconductor devices field have found their way to the classroom through the collaboration of a handful of well-written books and tutorial papers. However, the electrical engineering student at junior and senior level is usually confused when exposed to subjects where voltage drops in semiconductor structures are involved. Two years ago, the author and collaborators wrote a note concerning potentials in semiconductor structures with added carriers. The approach and language used in that tutorial presentation aroused interest among colleagues in the teaching profession. The same approach and language are used in this paper to discuss potential drops in Metal-Dielectric-Semiconductor capacitors. These devices have excited considerable interest recently and may well be incorporated as subject material in an undergraduate curriculum in electrical engineering. View full abstract»

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  • Onsager's Theorem from Thermodynamics

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 136 - 139
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    The Onsager theorem pertains to symmetries inherent in two-dimensional current flow, through either a conducting or a semiconducting medium in the presence of an externally applied magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the current-carrying plane. Although the theorem can be derived on a statistical basis, as done originally by Onsager, in many courses dealing with thermoelectricity, it is necessary to state the theorem without proof, rather than take the time to develop the background properly. Therefore, it is of considerable pedagogical interest to have a derivation of the theorem based upon thermodynamics only. To that end, the following discussion has been found useful. View full abstract»

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  • Teh Philosophy, Design, and Development of Miartes

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 140 - 149
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5703 KB)  

    "Miartes" is a code name for a Missile Autopilot Research and Teaching Simulator designed initially to satisfy the requirement for a special-purpose analog computer on which the principles of missile control and automatic control engineering could be taught simultaneously. The simulator is based on the roll autopilot suitable for the hypothetical missile "Flying Shrew." A sophisticated flight envelope, extending in altitude from sea-level to 70 000 feet and in speed from Mach 1.0 to Mach 2.0, necessitates a novel approach to the computer design if rescaling is to be avoided. The sophisticated ffight envelope chosen vividly illustrates the need for some form of adaptive autopilot loop. The simulator is intended to supplement more complex specialized computers, and general-purpose analog computers in an integrated course involving several specializations. It has been found that the use of the "Flying Shrew" mathematical model has enabled a thorough integration between lecture room and laboratory to be achieved. Calibration of the simulator is directly in terms of missile autopilot parameters, and, since rescaling is avoided, the effective student absorption rate is at least four times greater than with older methods of teaching. The simulator is also an excellent basis for student design and research projects. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 150 - 151
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Index to IEEE Transactions on Education Volume E-8, 1965

    Publication Year: 1965 , Page(s): 151a - 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University