IEEE Transactions on Education

Issue 3 • Aug. 1984

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Society

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s): c2
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  • Scanning the issue

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):113 - 114
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  • Required: Three Hours in Technical Communications-Paradigm for a Paradox

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):115 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1973 KB)

    It seems paradoxical that industry indicates that engineers need communications skills, and universities appear to agree, but that universities allocate very little time in the curriculum to train engineers in written communications. This paper identifies that paradox and stresses that in response to limitations of time, the technical communications teacher must design an introductory course which... View full abstract»

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  • Technical writing-"very useful stuff"

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):120 - 124
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1591 KB)

    Experience at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University indicates that students in engineering and science need a course in technical writing. A one-quarter course there begins with a review of general editing principles, based on Strunk and White's Elements of Style, and an introduction to specific principles of organizing and editing technical material. Students then write a series of ... View full abstract»

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  • Learning through Writing in an Engineering Course

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):125 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1771 KB)

    In the fall 1982 semester, engineering report writing was integrated into the structure of a junior-level electrical engineering course at Howard University. The required homework consisted of engineering reports instead of the traditional textbook problem sets. A follow-up analysis of grades on examinations, on reports, and in later courses showed that 1) student understanding of engineering subj... View full abstract»

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  • Using Team Reporting Projects to Teach Concepts of Audience and Written, Oral, and Interpersonal Communication Skills

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):129 - 136
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1824 KB)

    A series of team reporting projects is used to teach concepts of audience and written, oral, and interpersonal communication skills in technical and professional communication courses at the University of Texas at Arlington. Supplemental to conventional reporting assignments, the projects range from short exercises done in a single class period to extended out-of-class projects involving both a li... View full abstract»

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  • A Communication Curriculum in Engineering Education: An Alternative Model

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):137 - 142
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2044 KB)

    Typical model curricula in engineering disciplines assume that training in communication will occur early in the students' academic career in the courses taken to meet the general liberal arts requirements of the university. This paper argues that this assumption defines communication as a preliminary skill to be learned as a prelude to technical study. An alternative view perceives increasing sop... View full abstract»

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  • From University Term Papers to Industry Technical Reports an Attempt to Bridge the Existing Gap

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):143 - 147
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2051 KB)

    This paper investigates the reasons for the existing university-industry written communication gap and suggests ways for bridging it. Unfortunately, most university programs do not adequately help students with technical communications. Consequently, the new engineer, when hired, will have the burden of overcoming the gap of technical writing, apart from his other important engineering tasks. Ther... View full abstract»

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  • Of Classrooms and Contexts: Teaching Engineers to Write Wrong

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):148 - 150
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1629 KB)

    Classrooms, especially engineering classrooms, can be poor places for students to learn about writing. By their very nature as training grounds, engineering classes establish a misleading context for writing. Through the writing done for these classes, students learn to ignore their readers, to misunderstand the purpose of the writing they will do on the job, and to misconstrue the crucial process... View full abstract»

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  • Teaching Engineering Students to Communicate

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):151 - 154
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1688 KB)

    Five class exercises are suggested for inclusion in the syllabus of any course in technical writing or technical communication. The exercises are designed to develop strategic decisions in writing and publishing. They cast the student in the role of decision maker instead of a tyro, whose sole class work is drill in basic principles. View full abstract»

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  • Technical Writing Attitude Measurement and Instructional Goals

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):154 - 159
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2878 KB)

    Although computers are important tools to help learners improve their writing skills, the instructor must still establish the instructional goals of a course. This study presents an instrument, the Technical Writing Attitude Measurement, that measures students' attitudes toward their technical writing skills and provides data and objectives which help the instructor develop instructional materials... View full abstract»

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  • What Technical and Scientific Communicators Do: A Comprehensive Model for Developing Academic Programs

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):160 - 166
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (2303 KB)

    A growing number of colleges and universities are preparing programs to educate students for careers as technical and scientific communicators. The educators who design these new programs have three major resources to help them determine what their programs should look like: descriptions of existing programs; published articles that discuss program design in a general way; and advice from practici... View full abstract»

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  • Increasing Aural Skills of International Graduate Students

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):167 - 170
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    This paper deals with a successful attempt to improve the linguistic proficiency of international graduate students at Tennessee Technological University. Without proper guidance by skilled English language instructors at the very beginning of their graduate program, these newly arrived students may find themselves at a great disadvantage in the American classroom because they invariably lack the ... View full abstract»

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  • A survey of technical communication programs in U.S. colleges and universities-1984

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s):171 - 175
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (855 KB)

    Bachelor-, master-, and doctorate-leve technical communication in U.S. colleges and universities are tabulated by state from 1983-1984 academic data. The program are grouped into six categories: communication, communication theory, English (technical writing emphasis), technical communication, technical journalism, and technical writing. View full abstract»

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    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s): 175-a
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1984, Page(s): 175b
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Education (ToE) publishes significant and original scholarly contributions to education in electrical and electronics engineering, computer engineering, computer science, and other fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University