By Topic

Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date Feb. 1974

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (90 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Education Group

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (109 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • A National Effort to Increase Minority Engineering Graduates

    Page(s): 1 - 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1173 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Women and Minorities in Engineering

    Page(s): 3 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1215 KB)  

    This paper presents factual and estimated data of the representation of women and minorities in the engineering profession based on census data, membership information from technical societies, and student enrollments. The representations for women and minorities in engineering are then evaluated in relation to their position in the total U. S. population. The ethnic minorities include blacks, Spanish-surnamed, Orientals, and Native Americans. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Some Comparisons between Women and Ethnic Minority Engineers

    Page(s): 7 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (722 KB)  

    There are both similarities and differences in the circumstances and problems faced by women and members of ethnic minority groups when considering engineering as a career. This paper focuses on aspects of both, centering primarily on comparisons between the situations of black males and white females as a representative of the two largest minority groups in engineering today. Some references to American Indians and Spanish-speaking Americans are also included. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Are Chicanos Attending Universities?

    Page(s): 10 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (670 KB)  

    There are marked differences between Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Spanish-speaking people and other ethnic minority groups as they relate to attracting, recruiting and retaining these students in engineering curricula and in preparing them for productive and satisfying careers as engineers. For example, educational institutions must radically improve the educational delivery system for the Chicano, thus providing these students with the necessary tools and credentials essential to successfully compete in our contemporary society. Although some educators accept this responsibility, many do not know how best to accomplish the goal. This paper helps to define the needs of Spanish-speaking people generally and makes specific suggestions on how to make progress in increasing the involvement of Chicanos in the engineering profession. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Attracting and Motivating the American Indian Student into Engineering and Technology

    Page(s): 12 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (885 KB)  

    After examining the inadequately low enrollment of American Indians in studies leading to degrees in Engineering and Engineering Technology, this paper attempts to discuss the reasons for this shortage. It also suggests methods to encourage, motivate, and enable Native American youth to start meaningful studies in these fields. However, to succeed with these methods, a constructive input must come from within the Indians. The writers emphasize the necessity of an early start in motivating the students to take the needed subjects in their secondary education. Orientation lectures should inform them, for instance, what is expected from an engineering or technology student at a university and what engineering work involves. Information obtained by field trips, moving demonstration units, science clubs, etc., should supplement these lectures. It is also necessary that reservation teachers and counselors be involved in the orientation program. Training programs in nearby universities could supplement their background in the nature of engineering as well as in teaching science and mathematics with special reference to technical applications. The implementation of the whole program, including the demonstration units, teachers' programs, tutorials, etc., would require a considerable amount of funds. The establishment of a suitable position for the coordination of all the pertinent activities is definitely needed along with the support of the program by professional organizations as well as by the Indians. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Financing the Commitment to Increase the Number of Minority Engineers

    Page(s): 16 - 31
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3019 KB)  

    Financial support for minority engineering education must be provided if a 10-fold increase in minority engineering graduates is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the financial requirements as well as the possible sources of financial support. Sources of financial support include the family, student, educational institution, government, foundations, and employers. The author recommends that employers provide a larger proportion of the financial support for minority engineering students. Considerable quantitative data are developed and documented as a basis for that conclusion. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Minority Groups in Engineering Tapping Their Untapped Potential

    Page(s): 32 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1386 KB)  

    This paper analyzes many of the social, economic, and educational impedances that have retarded the progress of minorities in their efforts to enter higher education generally and engineering in particular. The author argues that now is the time for the professional engineering schools, the professional societies, and industry to look beyond those social, economic, and educational impedances and, through their combined efforts, solve the problems of how potentially capable minority youth can enter the engineering field. The opportunity is available and the road is open to providing broader educational opportunities for segments of our population with great untapped potential. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Formula for Action: ME3=Minority Engineering Education Effort

    Page(s): 37 - 43
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1735 KB)  

    There is a national imperative to forge a productive engineering career ladder from the barrios, ghettos and reservations of this nation to the boardrooms and upper management positions of American industry. Creation of exemplary systems to provide minorities a sound engineering education, meaningful post-graduate employment, and assignments to increasingly challenging positions-all critical steps along the way-will be ineffective without encouragement to and preparation of minority youth to fill the lower rungs of education. This paper describes the philosophies and activities of the ME3Task Force, a collective attempt by several groups to bring the career ladder of engineering into clear focus of precollege minority youth and to encourage and help prepare them in their steps toward the next rung-college education. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Colleges Can Locate Qualified Minority Students for Engineering Education

    Page(s): 43 - 47
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1092 KB)  

    A greater effort must be made by both industry and the engineering schools if we are to educate more minority engineers in the next ten years. This paper approaches that challenge from the viewpoint of locating qualified minority engineering candidates for the colleges. Recruitment and admissions are recognized as related operations but they are treated independently and pragmatically in this paper. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Engineering Opportunity Program: A Transition Program for Disadvantaged Students

    Page(s): 47 - 50
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1071 KB)  

    The paper is based on the authors' experiences since 1967 in planning and operating special programs for educationally and economically disadvantaged minority students at both the secondary school and collegiate level. They describe the special problems faced by the minority student in transition from high school graduation through the first years of an engineering curriculum with particular attention paid to providing the environment in which the minority student can make a successful transition. Some curriculum developments in freshman science and mathematics are also described. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Using Engineering-Related Employment to Supplement Engineering Education for Minorities

    Page(s): 50 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (491 KB)  

    Three programs based on engineering-related employment as a means for enhancing traditional engineering education are described in this paper. The examples illustrate how business and education-working together-can make a significant impact on alleviating the shortage of minority representatives in the engineering profession. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Co-operative engineering education-a means for meeting a national need to increase the number of black engineering graduates

    Page(s): 52 - 55
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (724 KB)  

    This paper outlines a co-operative engineering curriculum involving a "pre-co-op work/experience" immediately following graduation from high school. The University of Tennessee has found this an effective means of attracting and motivating more minority students to study engineering. The paper outlines the program including a typical work/study schedule and includes comments of participants about their experiences in the program. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The Dual Degree (3-2 Plan) Approach to Educating Minority Engineers

    Page(s): 56 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (624 KB)  

    Dual degree programs or 3-2 plans as they are sometimes called have been in existence since the 1930' s. Only a few such plans, however, seemed to be productive. Since so many blacks attend the traditional Black liberal arts colleges, and since these colleges fulfill many of the needs of Black youth so effectively, it behooves the engineering educator to look to the Black liberal arts colleges as a source of well prepared prospective engineering students. In 1968 both the Atlanta University Center and Georgia Tech committed significant manpower to coordinating and improving their dual degree program. This paper describes the Georgia Tech approach to developing dual degree programs including both the progress and the promise of this approach to engineering education and particularly towards increasing the number of minority engineering graduates. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Minority Graduate Education

    Page(s): 59 - 61
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (653 KB)  

    The fact that so few minority engineers graduate each year suggests that the potential for action at the graduate level is limited at this time. Beyond the small number of baccalaureate graduates, however, there are other reasons that deter many minorities from entering graduate school including attractive starting salaries at bachelor's level; accumulative debts from financing their undergraduate education; a lack of career orientation to point out the benefits of graduate engineering education; and pursuit of post-baccalaureate study in non-engineering disciplines. The author describes these deterrents and suggests ways of handling them. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Playing It Straight

    Page(s): 62 - 64
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (608 KB)  

    The author shares his personal experiences at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute relating to all aspects of the campus life of black students both at the graduate and undergraduate level. There are certain clear-cut guidelines that must be developed if any program is going to work and not only increase the number of minority students entering engineering programs, but also improve the probability of their completing their programs and graduating. A basic element of the successful program is openness and frankness-"lay out all cards on the table." View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Black Engineering Schools

    Page(s): 65 - 69
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1293 KB)  

    To doubt whether or not predominantly black institutions have a role to play in American life is to not understand the pluralistic nature of American society. Engineering education has played an important role in the past development of these universities and will play an even larger role in the years ahead due to the capacity of engineering to penetrate so many other fields. This paper presents a brief history of the predominantly black engineering schools: North Carolina A & T State University, Prairie View University, Southern University, Tennessee State University, Howard University, and Tuskegee Institute. Particular attention is given to the evolution of their curricula and alternative and recommended future roles. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Contributors

    Page(s): 70 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (4655 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Membership Application for the IEEE Education Group

    Page(s): 73-a - 73-b
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (112 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 73c
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (165 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University