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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Aug. 1971

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Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • Introduction

    Page(s): 85
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  • The Junior Electronics Laboratory: Opportunities for Invention

    Page(s): 86 - 89
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    An electronic circuit design laboratory for juniors emphasizes creativity and innovation in solving practical problems. Students in pairs do the design, construction, and measurement on each project. Students are free to select the method(s) of attack and the materials and instruments they need. The working circuit is demonstrated and the design is defended in an oral examination once a week. Laboratory scheduling and the duties of each member of the laboratory staff are discussed. The costs in man hours and materials of running the laboratory are broken down and the use of materials donated by industrial gift programs is pointed out. The final project of the semester, lasting three weeks, simulates a typical industrial engineering atmosphere. The students compete to see who can design the lowest cost circuit that meets the specifications. Costs for materials, labor, patent applications, and royalties are totaled in the comparison. The problem selected is one with many solutions and many clever ideas result from this competition. View full abstract»

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  • An Economical Self-Supervised Individually Operated Open Electronics Laboratory

    Page(s): 90 - 94
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    A senior electronics laboratory at Michigan Technological University has operated for more than a year with 100 students each term working individually on an open laboratory basis. The objectives of the laboratory are to teach the theory and practice of experimentation and supplement engineering theory presented in the classroom. Students schedule their laboratory time in two-hour blocks and perform experiments alone without direct supervision. This laboratory has increased development of experimental skills for all students compared with traditional group operation. The laboratory has functioned on a small budget with no new equipment in the first year and no increase in instructor time. This mode of operation is presently being extended to selected analog, digital, and electromagnetic laboratories. View full abstract»

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  • A Study of Scheduling and Examination Factors on Electrical Engineering Laboratory Instruction

    Page(s): 95 - 101
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    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of introducing several variations of examination and scheduling procedures in two electrical engineering laboratory courses at Purdue University. In both courses sections were divided into two types: one with oral examinations, the other without. Schedule variations in Course A consisted of conventional scheduling and a one-time tutorial arrangement. Three scheduling methods, providing various degrees of flexibility on the part of the student, were tried in Course B. Each course provided the basis for a crossed factorial design, which was analyzed using analysis of variance techniques. Operational descriptions of the examination and scheduling factors are given along with a discussion of any special administrative or logistical steps necessary to implement the various teaching techniques. The instructional combinations were evaluated by means of a common final examination and a questionnaire designed to measure differences in attitude, work loads, perception of student-instructor relations, etc. Analysis of variance techniques were used to evaluate the relative contribution of each factor or combination of factors. Results of administering the final exams and questionnaire are presented and implications of the study are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • From the Abstract to the Practical: Teaching a Project Laboratory

    Page(s): 101 - 107
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    The pedagogical basis for one of the M.I.T. project laboratories, "Audio Frequency Communications," where students work on independent projects in electronic signal processing, is presented along with a discussion of its raison d'être. The format is unstructured, with the projects being used as a basis for the topic discussions. Appendixes list the project suggestions and the range of of topics discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Electrical Engineering Education in an Industrial Laboratory

    Page(s): 108 - 110
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    This paper describes a unique electrical engineering laboratory course. This laboratory is an example of industry-university cooperation in engineering education. The organization and operation of the course is outlined and explained. The educational benefits derived from such cooperation between industry and the university are briefly detailed. These benefits are extended to the students, the university, the faculty, and the participating industry. This paper provides the framework and challenge to industry from which other laboratory experiences can be conceived and developed. View full abstract»

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  • Fourier Analysis Using Coherent Light

    Page(s): 110 - 115
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    Simple lenses can be used to produce the Fourier transform of a spatial signal. Two optical experiments related to Fourier analysis are described. The first experiment measures the power spectrum of a spatial signal and displays the result directly on an oscilloscope. The second experiment measures both the convolution and the correlation of two spatial signals and again displays the result on an oscilloscope. The use of the experiments in undergraduate engineering laboratories at Oakland University is described. View full abstract»

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  • An Economy Integrated Circuits Laboratory

    Page(s): 116 - 117
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    The high cost of establishing and maintaining an integrated circuit fabrication facility is prohibitive for many electrical engineering programs. As discussed in this paper, an integrated circuit laboratory experience can be realized for a total investment of less than $ 5000. The laboratory is based upon the monolithic integrated circuit breadboards commercially available, and requires a lead bonder for interconnecting elements on the breadboard chips. Characteristics and limitations of monolithic structures are readily studied in this laboratory, and student-generated custom-designed circuits are easily assembled. View full abstract»

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  • An Adaptive Approach to Teaching Integrated Circuit Fabrication

    Page(s): 118 - 122
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    The feasibility of including integrated circuit fabrication in an electrical engineering curriculum is discussed. Using specific examples from an operational program, it is shown that fabrication experience can be effectively introduced in the first course in a laboratory sequence. Both the technical and financial aspects of instituting such a program are considered. It is found that by taking an adaptive approach a school can obtain the necessary technology and equipment at a very reasonable expense. View full abstract»

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  • An Undergraduate Materials Laboratory for Electrical Engineers

    Page(s): 122 - 126
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    The understanding of solid-state electronic materials is greatly improved by a laboratory, particularly at the undergraduate level where a complete theoretical treatment of the subject is not possible. In the laboratory described in this paper, students work on term projects dealing with the measurement of fundamental electrical and optical characteristics of semiconductors and with the fabrication of simple semiconductor devices. The students are given a great deal of freedom in choosing and developing their own techniques and instrumentation. View full abstract»

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  • Equipment for the Digital Laboratory

    Page(s): 127 - 133
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    This paper contains a summary of parts of the report by COSINE Task Force VI on Digital Systems Laboratories. The types of equipment available either commercially or locally built are described and compared to aid the individual who is starting or expanding a digital lab in the selection process. The kinds of equipment discussed are broken into three major areas: logic networks, modular components, and minicomputers. The order of acquisition of these equipments is particularly stressed. View full abstract»

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  • The Evolution of a Digital Subsystem Laboratory

    Page(s): 134 - 138
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    Over the past five years a digital subsystem laboratory has been developed at Purdue University. The laboratory is operated in two parts: a closed shop portion with specialized instruction in digital subsystems and an open shop portion with a large repertoire of experiments from which the students may select those of particular interest. This paper describes the development of this laboratory as well as its operation. A detailed list of the various experiments which have been successfully used in both the open and closed shop portions is included. A short discussion of the accompanying digital design course material is also presented. View full abstract»

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  • Programmed Instruction for Use of the Oscilloscope

    Page(s): 138 - 140
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    Programmed instruction is being used to teach use of the oscilloscope in the first electrical engineering laboratory course at the University of Texas. A programmed text was developed that breaks down the process of operating a scope into a series of logical steps starting with deflection of the electron beam and continuing through proper use of the triggering controls to measure the phase difference between two waveforms. Students take from 8 to 45 hours to complete the program, which requires both preparation and laboratory work. Results from practical examinations and observation of student performance in later courses indicate that students learn to use the oscilloscope more effectively from the program than from conventional laboratory instruction. Use of programmed instruction in the first course assures that every student learns to use the oscilloscope and provides for a wide range of individual abilities. View full abstract»

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  • An Integrated Circuit Mask Fabrication Facility for Universities

    Page(s): 140 - 141
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    A brief description of the construction of an inexpensive integrated circuit mask fabrication facility is presented along with comments on operating procedures that have been found useful. View full abstract»

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  • A Switching Circuits Laboratory

    Page(s): 141 - 143
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    A switching circuits laboratory has been developed during the past year within the Computer Science Division at the University of Utah. This laboratory is used for a project-oriented undergraduate course and as a facility for independent study and theses. The laboratory equipment was all designed and built at the university and is inexpensive, reliable, and relatively easy to duplicate. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 144 - 146
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 146a
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University