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Education, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1970

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Education Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 133
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  • Computer-Assisted Instruction: A Survey

    Page(s): 134 - 141
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    In recent years, much effort has been expended in trying to adapt the computer to the education field. Under the title computer-assisted instruction (CAI), many research projects have designed systems to assist in teaching a wide variety of subjects. Although experiences appear to be broad, the effectiveness of CAI is not clear. In addition, almost all researchers have avoided the question of cost and hence practicality of using CAI. A comprehensive survey of the CAI field, in addition to an outline of the application of CAI to a police departnent, is presented. View full abstract»

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  • An Economical Remote Teaching System

    Page(s): 141 - 147
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    The Arizona remote teaching system (ARTS) provides an inexpensive means of teaching regular college courses wherever and whenever desired. ARTS is described in terms of its three component subsystems: the manuscript generator, reproduction equipment, and playback equipment. The unique record and local playback features of the manuscript generator are emphasized. These features, along with the short programming time required, greatly facilitate the production of software. Different modes and uses of playback equipment are also discussed in some detail. Past, present, and future uses of this remote teaching system are described. View full abstract»

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  • Audio-Visual Books: A Supplemental Educational Tool

    Page(s): 148 - 151
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    A low-cost educational tool involving the use of cassette tape players and accompanying visual material to provide lectures on demand is described. The advantages and limitations of this tool as well as some operating experiences are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Oral Briefing at Tektronix

    Page(s): 152 - 153
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    The oral communication needs of contemporary engineers show a definite desire for training in technical speaking. Project reports, professional meetings, and oral briefings are integral to the engineer's work. Since most colleges and universities do not offer the specialized training that engineers need in this area, industry itself is called upon to implement such courses. Tektronix, Inc., of Beaverton, Ore., has taken this course of action. In the "oral briefing" course we attempted to do several things: 1) discuss the principles underlying effective oral communication; 2) conduct in-class oral briefing practices; 3) critique the oral efforts of the class members. As a result of this first course, additional classes are now being taught and others are being planned for the future. View full abstract»

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  • Electronic Circuit Analysis and Design by Driving-Point Impedance Techniques

    Page(s): 154 - 167
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    By using driving point impedance (DPI) techniques a systematic approach to the analysis of electronic circuits can be developed which helps the engineer gain insight into circuit action. The answers, representing the circuit's currents, voltages, gains, and driving-point impedances, are written down by inspection of the original circuit diagram without resorting to equivalent circuits of flow graphs. The resulting answers are in a most simple form which can be easily interpreted by inexperienced persons since the relative magnitude of each factor is known. Thus, the student rapidly obtains a "feel" for electronic circuits. The method can also be used to complement a computer-aided circuit design and analysis. A tutorial treatment of the fundamental methods is presented and two examples are given. The simple example, which is complex by ordinary standards, has five input signals and three active elements; yet the output signal voltage is written out by inspection with each step explained. The second example, a two-stage transistor feedback amplifier, is used to demonstrate how the fundamental concepts are applied to complex feedback circuits. The gain, input impedance, and output impedance of the feedback amplifier are found and approximations are used to compare the answers to ordinary solutions given for such amplifiers. The answers obtained by DPI analysis methods are also compared to equivalent answers found by node analysis. View full abstract»

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  • Electromechanics in the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Page(s): 167 - 175
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    Electromechanics, not in the confined traditional sense, but rather as the broader subject of interactions between mechanical media and electromagnetic fields, represents an opportunity for teaching both mechanics and electromagnetic field theory to electrical engineering undergraduates. Over the past six years, text material, films, and demonstrations have been developed at M.I.T. for an undergraduate course which, in a fundamental way, serves the diversity of interests held by electrical engineers: interests that range from rotating machines to plasmas and from control systems to image processing techniques. A sumnmary is given of the philosophy, content, and organization of the course with emphasis given to "threads of continuity" and motivational material. The observations are made with the benefit of discussions from a workshop sponsored by the National Science Foundation, and held in the sunmmer of 1968. This workshop brought together interested faculty for discussions related to a course of the type described. View full abstract»

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  • Grades, Quizzes, Motivation, and Computers

    Page(s): 176 - 180
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    The following paper describes the use of a simple FORTRAN computer program that may be used to determine course grades. The program is based on processing a set of IBM punched data cards. Each card contains the name of a student and all of his grades, including the final examination grade. The program may also be used to predict the final examination grade, based on previous quiz grades, and then, in turn, to predict the final course grade. It is thus possible to use this program periodically throughout the entire semester in order to provide the student, as well as the instructor, with a measure of his progress. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 181 - 182
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  • Special Issue on Innovations in Electrical Engineering Laboratory Instruction

    Page(s): 183
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  • Special Issue on the Application of Computers to Electrical Engineering Education

    Page(s): 183
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 183a
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Aims & Scope

Educational research, methods, materials, programs, and technology in electrical engineering, computer engineering, and fields within the scope of interest of IEEE.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Jeffrey E. Froyd
Texas A&M University