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Systems, Man and Cybernetics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 8 • Date Aug. 1981

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Displaying Results 1 - 17 of 17
  • [Table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): c2
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  • Structures for Distributed Decisionmaking

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 517 - 527
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2161 KB)  

    The problem of optimally controlling a large, stochastic, dynamical system has challenged control system designers for years, particularly when communication resources between ports of the system are quite scarce. Optimal control methods are known to lead to analytically intractable control laws due to the possibility of signaling through the system. A new formulation of the distributed control problem is presented which avoids such behavior by restricting the scope of each decision agent's knowledge of the underlying system dynamics. Within this framework techniques for solving the individual agents' problems can be developed. These techniques support coordination strategies as discussed in a companion paper. View full abstract»

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  • Strategies for Distributed Decisionmaking

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 527 - 538
    Cited by:  Papers (23)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2253 KB)  

    Several mechanisms which can be used in the real-time distributed coordination of large-scale dynamical systems which display a subsystem structure are derived. A spectrum of approaches using varying degrees of types of communication to reduce the uncertainty of each agent concerning the events controlled by others is presented. The organizational requirements of each coordination strategy in terms of constraints on the interagent relationships are derived, and it is shown that while any of the mechanisms discussed here work well in hierarchical organizational structures, many are adaptable to much larger classes of structures. View full abstract»

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  • Obtaining Nondominated Priority Vectors for Multiple Objective Decisionmaking Problems with Different Combinations of Cardinal and Ordinal Information

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 538 - 543
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (972 KB)  

    Three versions of the multiple attribute (objective) decisionmaking problem with additive utilities are considered. The versions vary according to whether the preferences available for the objectives and the preferences for different attributes for each objective are cardinal or ordinal. In the versions considered, at least one of these two preferences is ordinal. The solution techniques presented either result in a single priority vector or a nondominated set of priority vectors for the alternatives. View full abstract»

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  • A Computer-Based Interactive System for Group Decisionmaking

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 544 - 552
    Cited by:  Papers (36)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3781 KB)  

    The rationale, design, and operation of the Perceptronics' Group Decision Aid, are described, and some experimental studies of its effectiveness are reported. The decision aid is supported by a PDP 11/45 minicomputer using the UNIX operating system. It features simple individual data entry terminals and a large screen (7 ft) color video display for feedback of computer-generated information. The system's purpose is to guide the group decisionmaking process by selective elicitation of a decision tree which incorporates value and probability inputs from all group members. Conflicts in value judgments are identified and discussions are initiated through use of multiattribute utility analysis. A specially trained system operator, called an intermediator, facilitates group interaction with the aiding program so that group members need have no prior familiarity with computers or decision analysis. Experimental studies are described comparing the performance, behavior, and responses of aided and nonaided groups in a complex international crisis decision problem. Improvements with aiding were noted in the completeness of the decision process and in the satisfaction and confidence of the group participants. View full abstract»

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  • A Dynamic Leontief Modeling Approach to Management for Optimal Utilization in Water Resources Systems

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 552 - 558
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1024 KB)  

    A quantitative framework to the problem of management for optimal utilization in water resources systems is developed using a dynamic Leontief modeling approach. The framework is comprised of a supply-demand disequilibrium model which allows for excess demand or supply to exist at any time. A linear control regulator formulation is undertaken in which the weighted difference between the time rate of change of actual water levels and the excess water demand is used as the control instrument. Application to the River Nile system is performed using the presently available data bank information. Several computer experiments illustrate the validity of the modeling approach and its suitability as a planning tool. View full abstract»

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  • Growth Considerations of a Self-Replicating Field Dependent on External Factors

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 558 - 563
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    A number of external factors influence the growth pattern of self-replicating systems (SRS). Three particular factors are considered: the pattern of growth and maturation, the influence of available surface space, and the human support and the parts components supplied to the initial set of replicating systems. Equations are derived that determine the optimum composition of initial replicating systems, human support, and parts components that will maximize the benefit of placing a replicating field on a planetary body, such as the moon, at a fixed cost. View full abstract»

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  • The Equilibria of KSIM Models: Existence, Stability, and Implications

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 564 - 570
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1262 KB)  

    The asymptotic behavior of the KSIM cross-impact model is investigated. A nonlinear state-variable representation of the continuous time model is developed and applied to determine conditions for the existence and stability of model equilibria. Results of this analysis confirm the empirical observation that KSIM model behavior is biased towards extremal equilibrium states, i.e., towards states in which all variables individually assume either minimum (zero) or maximum (unity) values. The implications of this result are considered. It is argued that the KSIM model is not a universally valid representational form for exploring system behavior, even for qualitative and heuristic purposes. The KSIM model is inherently inappropriate for representation of the broad class of systems exhibiting homeostasis in the usual sense, i. e., systems which tend to be stable and self-regulating at states which do not necessarily coincide with limiting conditions. View full abstract»

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  • A Constructive Approach to KSIM Model Analysis

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 571 - 574
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  • An Overview of the Basic Research Needed to Advance the State of Knowledge in Robotics

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 574 - 579
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  • Discrete Linear Control: The Polynomial Equation Approach

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 580
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  • Modern Control Systems

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 580
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 581 - 582
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  • IEEE copyright form

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 583 - 583-a
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  • IEEE Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 583-b
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 583c
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