IEEE Communications Magazine

Issue 1 • Jan. 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Desert Storm communications

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):19 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (264 KB)

    An overview of the communication network that supported Operation Desert Storm is presented. The system, which maintained a 98% availability rate, supported 700000 telephone calls and 152000 messages per day. More than 30000 radio frequencies were managed to provide necessary connectivity and to ensure minimum interference. The roles of communications satellites, switched networks and terrestrial ... View full abstract»

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  • DISA comes through (C/sup 4/I architecture)

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):22 - 25
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (385 KB)

    The development of a command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) architecture for the central command (CENTCOM) theater of operations during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm is described. CENTCOM C4I merged commercial and military communications systems into a fully integrated network. It employed tactical ground mobile forces (GMF) satellite systems, line-of-sight... View full abstract»

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  • The point of the spear (command and control communication system)

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):26 - 28
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (250 KB)

    The command and control communication system that supported the 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized) during their charge into Iraq in Operation Desert Storm is discussed. The three primary types of communications used were the tactical telephone network, single channel radios, and hard copy or message traffic. Background on the communication systems is presented, and planning for the operation and ... View full abstract»

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  • The rapid deployment digital satellite network

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):30 - 35
    Cited by:  Patents (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (472 KB)

    The ground mobile forces (GMF) satellite digital multichannel radio, which provided the US Marine Corps with the primary transmission links for its switched backbone during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, is discussed. Reliable and highly mobile, the multichannel terminals provided clear and consistent digital pipelines for the Marine Corps circuit switched network and were rapidly depl... View full abstract»

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  • Desert Storm: air assault communications

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):36 - 41
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (614 KB)

    The development of the US Army's 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Signal Battalion's command and control communications system from base-camp communications system into a system that provided division offensive communications which spanned more than 1000 miles and supported air assault ground and air combat offense operations in Iraq during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm is discuss... View full abstract»

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  • US Air Force communications in Desert Storm

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):42 - 44
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (273 KB)

    The US Central Command Air Forces' (USCENTAF) communications network for Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm is described. The Central Command Air Forces network utilized 27 SatCom terminals, 27 automatic switches, and 27 terrestrial links and had the responsibility of providing air traffic services across six countries at 24 locations handling 350000 flight operations. The system complexity... View full abstract»

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  • C/sup 4/I for the 21st century

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):48 - 50
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (307 KB)

    The development of the Copernicus Architecture, a command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) system, for the US Navy is discussed. The architecture is based on five thrusts uniting C4I form and function: replacement of equipment, new space and electronic warfare technologies, the use of combat centers, implementation of global indications and warning (I&W), and provides fo... View full abstract»

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  • Developing a command and control system in war

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):52 - 56
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (405 KB)

    The Army Central Forces (ARCENT) Command and Control Information System (AC2IS) that provided Army level staff officers with a secure means to pass electronic messages quickly and transfer data files long distances is discussed. AC2IS allowed users to generate memos, charts, and spreadsheets on a personal computer or workstation and then transmit them to a remote destination error-free. The system... View full abstract»

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  • HF radio in Southwest Asia

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):58 - 61
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (350 KB)

    The use of an HF propagation mode, called rear-vertical incidence skywave (NVIS), by the US Marine Corps is discussed. In an NVIS system, HF signals are radiated nearly vertically. The signal returned from the ionosphere covers the skip zone with an omnidirectional pattern providing a communications range from the transmitter site out to a radial distance of 0 to 300 miles. The development of HF c... View full abstract»

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  • Tactical military communications

    Publication Year: 1992, Page(s):62 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (6)  |  Patents (5)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract |PDF file iconPDF (999 KB)

    The evolution of Army tactical communications systems, starting with the formation of the Signal Corps in 1856, is outlined. The use of mobile subscriber equipment (MSE), the single channel ground and airborne radio system (SINCGARS), and the maneuver control system (MCS), among others, to support American troops in Operation Desert Storm is described, and a representative sample of signal unit em... View full abstract»

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IEEE Communications Magazine, considered by most to be their most important member benefit, provides timely information on all aspects of communications: monthly feature articles describe technology, systems, services, market trends, development methods, regulatory and policy issues, and significant global events.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Tarek S. El-Bawab
Jackson State University