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Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, IEEE

Issue 6 • Date June 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 23 of 23
  • Front cover - IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine - June 2007

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c1
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  • This month's cover...

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents - Vol 22 No 6

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1
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  • In this issue - Technically

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 2
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  • UAV Payload and Mission Control Hardware/Software Architecture

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 3 - 8
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3762 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper presents an embedded hardware/software architecture specially designed to be applied on mini/micro unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). A UAV is a low-cost non-piloted airplane designed to operate in D-cube (Dangerous-Dirty-Dull) situations [8]. Many types of UAVs exist today; however with the advent of UAV's civil applications, the class of mini/micro UAVs is emerging as a valid option in a commercial scenario. This type of UAV shares limitations with most computer embedded systems: limited space, limited power resources, increasing computation requirements, complexity of the applications, time to market requirements, etc. UAVs are automatically piloted by an embedded system named "Flight Control System." Many of those systems are commercially available today, however no commercial system exists nowadays that provides support to the actual mission that the UAV should perform. This introduces a hardware/software architecture specially designed to operate as a flexible payload and mission controller in a mini/micro UAV. Given that the missions UAVs can carry on justify their existence; we believe that specific payload and mission controllers for UAVs should be developed. Our architectonic proposal for them orbits around four key elements: a LAN-based distributed and scalable hardware architecture, a service/subscription based software architecture and an abstraction communication layer. View full abstract»

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  • General Aviation Aircraft Flight Operations Quality Assurance: Overcoming the Obstacles

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 9 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4481 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This describes the initiative to introduce a capable yet affordable Flight Operations Quality Assurance (FOQA) program into the general aviation industry. A brief overview of the FOQA concept is given along with a historical perspective to the evolution of such programs. Initial development of a FOQA program for general aviation by the Center for Sensors and Sensor Systems at Saint Louis University is introduced herein. A brief discussion of the obstacles in developing such a system is presented, as well as strategies for overcoming these obstacles. The system consists mainly of a quick access recorder (QAR) that is conceived to be a stand-alone, non-intrusive system that collects parametric flight data, a preprocessor system to analyze initial data sets and validate their use, and post-processor software used in the analysis of available flight parameters. The program concepts are presented for initial determination of the needs and possibilities, and examples are presented along with flight data collected in the University's fleet of aircraft. View full abstract»

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  • Taming Tornadoes Storm Abatement from Space

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 16 - 21
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3859 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Tornadoes represent the most dangerous and destructive of storms. This paper describes a concept for disrupting the formation of tornadoes in a thunderstorm. Beamed microwave energy from a satellite heats cold rain to affect convective forces in the storm cell. This describes a Thunderstorm Solar Power Satellite (TSPS). The TSPS is based on Space Solar Power Program (SSP) concepts and technology. The concept was evaluated in a numerical simulation using the Advanced Regional Prediction System Code at the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms (CAPS). Conditions for tornado formation were affected in the simulation. Additional simulation is proposed to determine the specific areas to be heated and the intensity of directed energy to affect tornadogenesis. Benefits from taming tornadoes provide a basis for initial government investment in TSPS. The potential benefits are balanced by reservations about safety. Demonstration of technology and operations may lead to commercial investment in space solar power. We conclude that the TSPS concept merits additional analysis, numerical simulation, and demonstration testing. View full abstract»

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  • Tetrahedral Robotics for Space Exploration

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 22 - 30
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5667 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A reconfigurable space filling robotic architecture has a wide range of possible applications. One of the more intriguing possibilities is mobility in very irregular and otherwise impassable terrain. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is developing the third generation of its addressable reconfigurable technology (ART) tetrahedral robotics architecture. An ART-based variable geometry truss consisting of 12 tetrahedral elements made from 26 smart struts on a wireless network has been developed. The primary goal of this development is the demonstration of a new kind of robotic mobility that can provide access and articulation that complement existing capabilities. An initial set of gaits and other behaviors are being tested, and accommodations for payloads such as sensor and telemetry packages are being studied. Herein, we describe our experience with the ART tetrahedral robotics architecture and the improvements implemented in the third generation of this technology. Applications of these robots to space exploration and the tradeoffs involved with this architecture will be discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Flight Operations in the New Millennium

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 31 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3450 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    New approaches are being studied for real-time interaction, and related supporting processes, with spacecraft and instruments in deep space. Spacecraft are evolving, improving in many ways, and generally becoming more robust. Operations is changing also, and will be more automated in the future. However, there is a challenge. Deep space missions are not all alike. The operations phases of discovery and exploration are an extension of the research that creates the mission; they are the time of obtaining results. This examines the historical role of flight operations and its evolving processes to develop an understanding of the operational methods that will be effective in the future. It takes people, equipment, software, space, and connectivity for operations success. A balance has to be struck between improving technology, gaining knowledge, automation, and realistic expectations. Finally, the recommended methods to gain efficiency in operations are system-wide services and shared resources. These common processes will meet the challenge of varied missions. View full abstract»

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  • IEEE Aerospace & Electronic Systems Society Organization

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 36
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  • Target Tracking [Society News & Information]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 37 - 38
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  • From the Editor-in-Chief [Society News & Information]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 39
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  • IEEE Autotestcon 2007

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 40
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  • Distinguished Lecturers Program

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 41
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  • IET RADAR 2007

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 42
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  • RADAR 2008 - First Call for Papers

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 43
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  • 2008 IEEE Radar Conference

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 44
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  • The Distinguished Tutorials Program [Society News & Information]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 45
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  • Responding to objections

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 46
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  • The Benefits of Membership

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 47
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  • 2007 IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society - Membership Application

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 48
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  • Directory of IEEE-AESS Personnel

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c3
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  • AESS Meetings & Conferences

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine publishes articles and tutorials concerned with the various aspects of systems for space, air, ocean, or ground environments.

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Teresa Pace, PhD EE
Chief Engineer SenTech
SenTech, LLC - A DSCI Company
12601 Research Parkway
Orlando, FL 32826
(407) 207-1900 ext: 2102
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tpace@sentech.dsci.com