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Engineering Management Review, IEEE

Issue 2 • Date Second Quarter 2007

This publication contains reprint articles for which IEEE does not hold copyright. Full text is not available on IEEE Xplore for these articles.

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  • Front cover - IEEE Engineering Management Review - Second Quarter 2007

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents - Vol 35 No 2

    Page(s): 1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • RFID [From the Editor]

    Page(s): 2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • RFID 101: The Next Big Thing for Management

    Page(s): 3
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  • Engineering Management-Focused Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Model Solutions

    Page(s): 20 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2233 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In comparison to the well known and widely used UPC bar codes, that offer generic object-level visibility, RFID tags, also referred to as the ePCs: electronic product codes with a 96-bit identification method, offer unique, item level visibility throughout the entire local and global supply chain. This is because UPC codes are typically product and manufacturer specific, whereas RFID codes are generic, truly unique IDs. This is why RFID technologies with the appropriate information systems and information technology (IS/IT) infrastructure help both major distributors and manufacturers, as well as other logistics operations, such as the electronic manufacturing industries, defense industries, automotive, pharmaceutical industries, and others, dealing with complex, global supply chains in which products and product manufacture, assembly and shipments must be traced and identified in a non-contact, wireless fashion. Engineering management is collaborating with IS/IT professionals to model and integrate RFID-related information systems engineering requirements into computer networks, because of reducing cost, increasing security, or safety, or because parts are subject to corrosion, or food/medicine is subject to quality degradation, or other reasons. All of these requirements point to an automated, wireless-readable sensory-based identification method, and network, that offers more functionalities and is significantly 'smarter' than the well known bar code or the unified product code (UPC). RFIDs are available as passive and/or active radio read/write sensor-packages with active read (and often write) capabilities in relatively large areas (like a large distribution center warehouse, or a containership), all performed automatically, supervised by computers and communicated in a wireless fashion over secure intranets. The attraction to an engineering management-focused supply chain manager is that when the RFID network is integrated with the factories' material resou- rce IT management systems, accurate information can be obtained on all tagged parts in close to real-time, throughout the entire supply-chain. This can include the globally distributed factories, as well as information about parts and assemblies during shipment, including in-transit. This is why RFID represents great research, technology, as well as huge business opportunities. In this paper we introduce some of the most important engineering management information system modeling principles, challenges and solutions, that RFID researchers, implementers and users should keep in mind when developing such systems, and/or planning for such applications. View full abstract»

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  • Criteria for Evaluating RFID Solutions for Records and Information

    Page(s): 31
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  • RFID Innovations Deepen Market Penetration

    Page(s): 36
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  • RFID and the Perception of Control: The Consumer's View

    Page(s): 40
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  • 'WAVE' of the Future?

    Page(s): 44
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  • Risks of RFID

    Page(s): 47
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  • RFID-Panacea or Pain?

    Page(s): 49
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  • RFID Privacy Issues and Technical Challenges

    Page(s): 51
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  • Ethical Perspectives on the Use of Radio Frequency Identification Tags

    Page(s): 57
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  • RFID Technologies: Supply-Chain Applications and Implementations Issues

    Page(s): 64
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  • RFID: Integration Stages in Supply Chain Management

    Page(s): 80 - 87
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (79 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) is an enabling technology that promises to create value through greater visibility in supply chain networks, higher product velocity, more efficient inventory management, reduced labor cost, and reduced human error. However, it is still not clear if these objectives can be fully achieved due to high tag costs and uncertain return-of-investment (ROI). We introduce the key components and concepts of RFID applications and identify key issues when implementing RFID in supply chain networks. We suggest an RFID integration model that allows for degrees of integration breadth. View full abstract»

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  • Challenges in RFID Enabled Supply Chain Management

    Page(s): 88
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  • Radio Frequency Identification Applications in Hospital Enviroments

    Page(s): 93
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  • Why Companies Fail

    Page(s): 99 - 101
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (34 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This article is about management of a business and how aware they must be in order to serve the consumer. Management must be aware of not only the external customer but the internal customer: the employee. By having a tightly-knit workforce which feels valued and rewarded by the management, having an effective and efficient infrastructure in place, and paying attention to clear and attainable goals and objectives, the external customer usually will be well served. In the final analysis, it is management who must be constantly aware of the innermost workings of the company - from the telephone operators and/or the automated answering system which is the first introduction of the consumer to the company - right through each department and, finally, to the topmost layer. And it's that top layer that leads the company by example as well as words. Without constant vigilance to even what might be considered minutiae and a consistently carried out method of surveillance, yesterday's award winning company could be tomorrow's failure. View full abstract»

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  • Surf's Up: Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) [Web site reviews]

    Page(s): 102 - 103
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    Provides examples of Web sites that shed light on technology advancements, deployment agendas, and consumer concerns surrounding them. View full abstract»

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  • Engineering Management Calendar

    Page(s): 104
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  • Engineering Management Society Chapter Chairs

    Page(s): c3
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  • Spine [Volume 35 Number 2, Second Quarter 2007]

    Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Engineering Management Review includes papers that are aimed at those engaged in managing research, development, or engineering activities.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief

Paul K. Bergey

The University of Melbourne
Department of Management & Marketing
10th Floor, 198 Berkeley Street
Victoria, 3010 Australia