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Nuclear Science, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3  Part 2 • Date June 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 41
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C1 - 530
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science publication information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Resolution Limits in 130 nm and 90 nm CMOS Technologies for Analog Front-End Applications

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 531 - 537
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (389 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In the last few years CMOS commercial technologies of the quarter micron node have been extensively used in the design of the readout electronics for highly granular detection systems in the particle physics environment. IC designers are now moving to 130 nm CMOS technologies, or even to the next technology generation, to implement readout integrated circuits for future HEP applications. In order to evaluate how scaling down of the device features affects their performances, continuous technology monitoring is mandatory. In this work the results of signal and noise measurements carried out on two CMOS commercial processes are presented. Data obtained from the measurements provide a powerful tool to establish design criteria in nanoscale CMOS processes for detector front-ends and can be used to evaluate the resolution limits achievable for low-noise charge sensitive amplifiers in the 100-nm minimum feature size range. View full abstract»

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  • A 60 μW High Linearity CMOS Peak-Stretcher/Discriminator

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 538 - 540
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (104 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present a pulse peak-stretcher/discriminator designed for applications where the constraints on power consumption and linearity are stringent. The circuit, realized in 0.35 mum CMOS technology, has almost two decades input signal range with a linearity error within - 0.08/ + 0.04%, measured at 33.6 mus peaking time. The circuit is supplied with a single voltage of 3.3 V with a total power consumption of 60 muW with a layout area of 125 mum x 65 mum. View full abstract»

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  • ASIC for Small Angle Neutron Scattering Experiments at the SNS

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 541 - 548
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1222 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We present an ASIC for a 3He gas detector to be used in small angle neutron scattering experiments at the spallation neutron source in oak ridge. The ASIC is composed of 64 channels with low noise charge amplification, filtering, timing and amplitude measurement circuits, where an innovative current-mode peak-detector and digitizer (PDAD) is adopted. The proposed PDAD provides at the same time peak detection and A/D conversion in real time, at low power, and without requiring a clock signal. The channels share an efficient data sparsification and derandomization scheme, a 30-bit 256 deep FIFO, and low voltage differential signaling. View full abstract»

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  • 60-Channel 10 μs Time-Resolution Counter Array for Long Term Continuous Event Counting

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 549 - 554
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (644 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Experiments in nuclear physics, biomedicine and astronomy often require pulse-counting electronics for large numbers of channels. This paper describes an event-counting system attached to 60 channels of an innovative monolithic array of single- photon avalanche diodes (SPADA) intended for astronomical use. The system can capture events with pulse-counting rates of up to 20 MHz, a minimum integration time of 10 mus, which results in a data acquisition rate of 100 000 frames per second. It can also store several hours' worth of data. This performance is achieved in a system that offers a high degree of flexibility, is small in size and has a low cost. The implementation is based on a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) single board, fitted with an FPGA and a DSP. This board is connected to a PC by means of an IEEE 1394 high-speed serial link which stores the collected data and functions as a TCP/IP server. The data acquisition parameters, as well as the collected data, can be accessed by means of a custom-designed interface running on a TCP/IP client. A proof-of-concept system has been assembled and some test stand results are presented and discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Noise Optimization of Charge Amplifiers With MOS Input Transistors Operating in Moderate Inversion Region for Short Peaking Times

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 555 - 560
    Cited by:  Papers (17)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (246 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The noise of a fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with an input MOS transistor operating in the moderate inversion region is discussed. The MOS transistor operation in the moderate inversion region becomes especially important in multichannel readout systems where limited power dissipation is required. The ENC of a CSA followed by a fast shaper is usually dominated by the voltage noise of the input MOS transistor. We carried out noise minimization for such a CSA, searching for an optimum input transistor width. The analyses were made using a simplified EKV model and were compared to HSPICE simulations using a BSIM3v3 model. We considered several CMOS technology generations with minimum transistor gate length ranging from 0.13 mum to 0.8 mum. We studied the sensitivity of ENC to the input transistor width, and propose a simple formula to estimate the optimum transistor width, which is valid in a wide current density range. View full abstract»

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  • Basic Performance of PHENEX: A Polarimeter for High ENErgy X rays

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 561 - 566
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1163 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We have been developing an instrument named "PHENEX (Polarimetry for High ENErgy X rays)" to measure polarization in the hard X-ray region. The PHENEX polarimeter consists of detector modules called "unit counters". We have investigated the performance of the unit counter, using a highly polarized beam in KEK-PF BL14A. From these measurements, we obtained a detection efficiency of 20% and a modulation factor (analyzing power for polarization) of 53% for 80 keV X rays. Assembling four unit counters, a balloon-flight version was constructed and a preliminary observation of the Crab Nebula was carried out on Jun. 13th, 2006. During this flight, the PHENEX polarimeter observed the Crab for about one hour and detected its hard X rays with a significance of 9sigma. From this result, we expect that a PHENEX polarimeter with nine "unit counters" would achieve a 17% minimum detectable polarization of the Crab Nebula with 3sigma significance in a 3-hour observation. View full abstract»

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  • Performance of the Zero Degree Calorimeters for the ALICE Experiment

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 567 - 573
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (403 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator nucleons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. The dipole magnets of the LHC beam optics will separate the ion beams from the spectator protons; the spectator protons and neutrons will be respectively detected by the proton (ZP) and the neutron (ZN) calorimeters. Since all the spectator nucleons have the same energy, the calorimeter response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. ZDCs are spaghetti calorimeters, which detect the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a dense absorber. The technical characteristics of ZP and ZN detectors are described. The calorimeters have been tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c; the ZN detector behaviour has also been studied with an indium beam of 158 GeV/c per nucleon. The beam test results are presented: the calorimeters response, the energy resolution and the localizing capability. Also the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are discussed. Moreover the differences between the ZP detector responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams. View full abstract»

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  • The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 574 - 577
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (186 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter aims at providing high precision calorimetry at the large madron collider (LHC). It consists of about 75.000 lead tungstate (PbWO4) crystals that have to operate reliably for at least 10 years, in a high radiation environment. In order to profit fully from the very good intrinsic energy resolution of the crystals, severe requirements on their temperature stability must be satisfied. Another challenge is given by the high data rates to be sustained by the readout electronics. With more than a half of the barrel modules produced, the calorimeter is well into its production phase. A large effort was devoted to optimize the integration between mechanics, cooling and readout electronics. The performance of the first modules has been tested in an electron beam, to validate the monitoring system and the calibration strategy. Very satisfactory results were achieved, in complete agreement with the goals of ECAL. An overview of the calorimeter design and of its construction status will be given, as well as the results from the testbeam measurements and the predicted performance at the LHC. View full abstract»

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  • Geant4 Model for the Stopping Power of Low Energy Negatively Charged Hadrons

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 578 - 584
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (363 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    An original model is presented for the simulation of the energy loss of negatively charged hadrons. It calculates the stopping power by regarding the target atoms as an ensemble of quantum harmonic oscillators; this approach allows to account for charge dependent effects in the stopping power, which are relevant at energies below a few MeV. The resulting antiproton stopping powers for different elements are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The model described in this paper is implemented in the Low Energy Electromagnetic package of the Geant4 Toolkit; it represents a significant improvement for the accurate simulation of low energy negative hadrons with respect to previously available models. View full abstract»

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  • Geant4 Atomic Relaxation

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 585 - 593
    Cited by:  Papers (14)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (230 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The Low Energy Electromagnetic package of the Geant4 toolkit incorporates a component for the simulation of atomic relaxation of elements with atomic number between 6 and 100. This process is triggered by the creation of a vacancy in the atomic shell occupancy as a result of an incident particle interaction with an atom of the target material. X-ray fluorescence and Auger electron emission result from the relaxation cascade. The availability of a model handling the atomic relaxation in Geant4 extends the applicability of the simulation toolkit to experimental use cases concerning the investigation of material properties through their characteristic X-ray or Auger emission. It is also relevant to precise simulation applications, like microdosimetry or the design and optimization of detectors based on nanotechnology. The key features of the software development process, the software architecture and design, and the implementation details of the physics model are described. View full abstract»

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  • Validation of Geant4 Atomic Relaxation Against the NIST Physical Reference Data

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 594 - 603
    Cited by:  Papers (11)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (276 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The accuracy of the Geant4 component for the simulation of atomic relaxation has been evaluated against the experimental measurements of the NIST Standard Reference Data. The validation study concerns X-ray and Auger transition energies. The comparison of the simulated and experimental data with rigorous statistical methods demonstrates the excellent accuracy of the simulation of atomic de-excitation in Geant4. View full abstract»

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  • A Rule-Based Verification and Control Framework in Atlas Trigger-DAQ

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 604 - 608
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (573 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In order to meet the requirements of ATLAS experiment data taking, the Trigger-DAQ (TDAQ) system is composed of O(10000) of applications running on more than 2600 computers in a network. With such a system size, software and hardware failures are quite frequent. To minimize system downtime, the Trigger-DAQ control system shall include advance verification and diagnostics facilities. The operator shall use tests and expertise of the TDAQ and detectors developers in order to diagnose and recover from errors, if possible automatically. The TDAQ control system is built as a distributed tree of controllers, where the behavior of each controller is defined in a rule-based language allowing easy customization. The control system also includes a verification framework which allows users to develop and configure tests for any component in the system with different levels of complexity. It can be used as a stand-alone test facility for a small detector installation, as part of the general TDAQ initialization procedure, and for diagnosing problems which may occur during run time. The system is currently being used in TDAQ commissioning at the ATLAS experimental zone and by subdetectors for stand-alone verification of the detector hardware before it is finally installed. View full abstract»

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  • Strategies and Tools for ATLAS Online Monitoring

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 609 - 615
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (721 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    ATLAS is one of the four experiments under construction along the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring at CERN. The LHC will produce interactions at a center-of-mass energy equal to radics = 14 TeV with a frequency of 40 MHz. The detector consists of more than 140 million electronic channels. The challenging experimental environment and the extreme detector complexity impose the necessity of a common, scalable, distributed monitoring framework, which can be tuned for optimal use by different ATLAS sub-detectors at the various levels of the ATLAS data flow. This paper presents the architecture of this monitoring software framework and describes its current implementation, which has already been used at the ATLAS beam test activity in 2004. Preliminary performance results, obtained on a computer cluster consisting of 700 nodes, will also be presented, showing that the performance of the current implementation is within the range of the final ATLAS requirements. View full abstract»

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  • Bus-Invert Coding for Low Noise, Low Power 2eSST VME64x Block Transfers

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 616 - 622
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3354 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The VME64x standard defines a double edge source synchronous block transfer (2eSST) capable to sustain a data transfer rate up to 320 MByte/s on the VMEbus. This level of performance is achieved by double edge clocking a 64-bit bus with bursts of data strobe pulses. The switching activity of such a wide bus on a shared backplane challenges the signal integrity and the data transfer reliability. The Bus-invert is a well known coding technique developed to lower the peak power dissipation in I/O busses by decreasing their switching activity. It has been originally proposed for lowering the power consumption of CMOS VLSI devices and so reducing the on-chip line coupling and noise. In this paper we discuss how the Bus-Invert coding can be applied to improve the 2eSST performance. A custom designed board-set has been used to characterize jitter, noise and power consumption with different data patterns, coding schemes and bus loading conditions. The hardware overheads introduced by the encoding algorithm is discussed in the view of deployments in low-latency, real-time applications. View full abstract»

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  • A VME-Based Readout System for the CMS Preshower Sub-Detector

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 623 - 628
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1043 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The CMS preshower is a fine grain detector that comprises 4288 silicon sensors, each containing 32 strips. The raw data are transferred from the detector to the counting room via 1208 optical fibres. Each fibre carries a 600-byte data packet per event. The maximum average level-1 trigger rate of 100 kHz results in a total data flow of ~72 GB/s from the preshower. For the readout of the preshower, 56 links to the CMS DAQ have been reserved, each having a bandwidth of 200 MB/s (2 kB/event). The total available downstream bandwidth of GB/s necessitates a reduction in the data volume by a factor of at least 7. A modular VME-based system is currently under development. The main objective of each VME board in this system is to acquire on-detector data from at least 22 optical links, perform on-line data reduction and pass the concentrated data to the CMS DAQ. The principle modules that the system is based on are being developed in collaboration with the TOTEM experiment. View full abstract»

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  • A Weighted Least Mean Squares Linear Algorithm for Energy and Occurrence Time Measurement of Pulse

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 629 - 634
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (348 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The availability of high performance configurable digital processors offers the possibility of real-time implementation of digital least-mean-square analysis methods in nuclear spectroscopy. A particularly simple, efficient and highly precise technique for reducing the mathematical complexity of least-mean-square algorithms used in deriving energy and arrival time of detected events is presented. The method has been theoretically developed and validated through comparison with state-of-the-art digital signal processing techniques. View full abstract»

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  • Muon Detection in the ATLAS CSC Detector

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 635 - 642
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (437 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The LHC and its participating experiments create a challenging data processing environment, characterized by a large amount of data in which only a small portion is expected to carry new scientific information. This publication addresses the problem of muon track detection in a cathode strip chamber (CSC), a component of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. A new algorithm, based on several novel ideas is introduced. The detect-before-estimate approach is presented, which first detects the muon track using a modified Hough transform, and then estimates the precise hit locations. The muon track detection is improved by taking into account additional, previously unused, information. It is shown that in the presence of high radiation background, the new detection procedure reduces the fake track identification rate significantly. For each track candidate, the hit cluster quality is calculated. It is then shown that including only good quality clusters in the track fitting algorithm, results in a better track parameter estimation. The algorithm is tested with real data taken from test beam, and evaluated using theoretical tools, especially developed for this problem. View full abstract»

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  • Calculation of Drift Velocities and Diffusion Coefficients for Xe+ Ions in Gaseous Xe/3He Mixtures

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 643 - 647
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The drift velocities and the longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients for Xe+ ions in gaseous Xe/3He mixtures, at atmospheric pressures, for Xe concentrations between 1 and 30%, and reduced electric field strengths, from about 3 to 70 Td, corresponding to E/p, from about 1 to 22.5 V cm-1Torr-1 at 300 K, are calculated by simulation using a detailed Monte Carlo computer programme. This programme uses a set of integral and differential elastic collision cross sections for Xe ions with neutral He and Xe atoms, previously calculated by the authors using a modified Tang-Toennies ion-atom interaction potential and the JWKB approximation to calculate the phase shifts. The calculated drift velocities of Xe+ ions depend strongly on the concentration of Xe in the mixtures. View full abstract»

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  • Intensive Irradiation Study on Monitored Drift Tubes Chambers

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 648 - 653
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (778 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Monitored drift tube chambers (MDT) are the precision tracking detectors in the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). From simulations of the LHC operating conditions, the count rate in the inner barrel chamber of the muon spectrometer is expected to reach 500 Hz/cm2 and can be ten times higher in the luminosity upgrade under discussion (SLHC). A degradation of the performances of drift tube chambers after extended operation in high-rate environment is usually caused by the formation of deposits on the anode wire. To study MDTs aging, three bundles of short tubes equipped like a final MDT chamber were irradiated in different periods with neutrons and photons using the TAPIRO nuclear reactor and the CALLIOPE gamma facility at the ENEA-Casaccia Research Center (Italy). The MDT performances with respect to accumulated dose were studied with cosmic rays and results on drift and tracking properties are presented. View full abstract»

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  • The Last Line of Defense: Designing Radiation Detection-Interdiction Systems to Protect Cities From a Nuclear Terrorist Attack

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 654 - 669
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (621 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We formulate and solve an optimization problem in which a terrorist is attempting to drive a nuclear weapon toward a city center, but needs to travel through an array of imperfect neutron radiation sensors that form a wall around the periphery of the city. A fleet of interdiction vehicles are available to chase, and attempt to interdict, vehicles that set off a sensor alarm. In our model, the government chooses the thickness (in terms of number of sensors) of the radiation wall, the neutron threshold in the sensors, and the number of interdiction vehicles to minimize the expected damage inflicted by a terrorist, subject to a budget constraint on sensors and interdiction vehicles. The terrorist observes the wall thickness and at each node he updates his likelihood of passing through a sensor without triggering an alarm and decides whether to proceed through the sensor or stop and detonate the bomb. Our results suggest that for an annual cost ranging from several million dollars to several tens of millions of dollars, depending upon the city's roadway topology, a single layer of sensors placed tens of miles from the city center and 10-20 dedicated interdiction vehicles could mitigate the damage from an unshielded or lightly-shielded plutonium weapon, but not from a uranium weapon or a radiological dispersal device. View full abstract»

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  • Using RPC Detectors as Cosmic Rays Monitor

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 670 - 676
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1185 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We have measured the cosmic ray absolute flux and its variations caused by the ldquoday-nightrdquo and the ldquobarometricrdquo effects, by using a telescope of resistive plate chamber (RPC) detectors. Because of the high sensitivity needed for this measure, the RPC behaviour must be very well controlled and all the influences induced by the environmental parameters, must be compensated. For this purpose we introduced, among others features, an alternative method for the stabilization of the RPC working point. We present here all the results for both aspects: the cosmic ray flux measurements, the barometric effect and a description of the RPC stabilization method used. View full abstract»

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  • Absolute Activity Determination of 198 Au Solid Source Using 4πβ —γ Coincidence Counting Corrected by Monte-Carlo Calculation

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 677 - 683
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (501 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    For the commissioning process of the OPAL nuclear reactor of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the thermal neutron flux is measured through the activity measurement of an activated Au wire, Au-Al (0.112% of Au) alloy wire and Au foil. The absolute activities of 198Au in the form of Au wire, Al-Au wire and Au foil were determined using the conventional 4pibeta-gamma coincidence-counting method. Monte Carlo simulation technique was employed to simulate the complicated absorption and attenuation processes of electrons and gamma photon interactions with the surrounding materials. The Monte Carlo calculated probabilities of escape beta particles, internal conversion electrons and photon-interaction generated photoelectrons and Compton electrons were used to determine the correction term of the coincidence equation. The corrections for the Au wire (length: 8.000 mm, radius: 0.064 mm), Al-Au wire (length: 7.690 mm, radius: 0.255 mm) and Au foil (thickness: 0.025 mm, radius: 3.000 mm) were found to be 5.2%plusmn0.1%, 2.6%plusmn0.1% and 4.2%plusmn0.2% respectively. The study demonstrates that the Monte Carlo calculation for the correction term of the coincidence equation can be applied to the absolute activity determination of radionuclides with well-defined source geometries with an uncertainty of better than 1%. View full abstract»

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  • Design of an Online, Multispectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) to Support Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 684 - 689
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1523 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The U.S. Department of Energy is embarking on a series of tests of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated-particle reactor fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR). As one part of this fuel development program, a series of eight (8) fuel irradiation tests are planned for the Idaho National Laboratory's (INLs) advanced test reactor (ATR). The first test in this series (AGR-1) will incorporate six separate capsules irradiated simultaneously, each containing about 51,000 TRISO-coated fuel particles supported in a graphite matrix and continuously swept with inert gas during irradiation. The effluent gas from each of the six capsules must be independently monitored in near real time and the activity of various fission gas nuclides determined and reported. A set of seven heavily-shielded, high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based total radiation detectors have been designed and are being configured and tested for use during the AGR-1 experiment. The AGR-1 test specification requires that the fission product measurement system (FPMS) have sufficient sensitivity to detect the fission gas release due to failure of a single coated fuel particle and sufficient range to allow it to ldquocountrdquo multiple (up to 250) successive particle failures. This paper describes the design and expected performance of the AGR-1 FPMS. View full abstract»

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Full Aims & Scope

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