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IEEE Annals of the History of Computing

Issue 1 • Jan.-March 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 15 of 15
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s): c1
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s): c2
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  • From the Editor's Desk

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s): 2
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  • The Dark Side of Computing: SRI International and the Study of Computer Crime

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):3 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (285 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    From the perspective of an information security researcher and consultant who studied crime for 40 years, this brief history of computer crime delves into study methods and presents findings from many years of National Science Foundation and US department of justice grant-supported research and business support at SRI International View full abstract»

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  • Founding of the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Computing Technology

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):16 - 33
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (753 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Computer science originated in the People's Republic of China in 1956 with the founding of the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Computing Technology. The Soviet Union, which played a pivotal role, gave the Chinese the opportunity to learn computer science by supplying components and describing the manufacturing process. The Soviets also helped solve key difficulties and trained workers View full abstract»

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  • Intel SIM8-01: A Proto-PC

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):34 - 48
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (527 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The SIM8-01 prototyping board was introduced by Intel in 1972 as a low-cost hardware aid for the development of applications involving Intel's 8008 microprocessor. This article traces the SIM8-01's development at Intel and analyzes its impact on the formation of the first wave of worldwide microcomputer activities View full abstract»

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  • Forming a Computer Science Center at the University of Maryland

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):49 - 64
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (595 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    The use of and first courses on computers at Maryland began in the 1940s. The computer science center beginnings are examined in the context of founding director Werner C. Rheinboldt's noteworthy accomplishments to develop a computation facility with research and educational components, supported by John Menard, assistant director. William F. Atchison, who replaced Rheinboldt as Center director, c... View full abstract»

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  • Early Computing at the University of Alberta and the Introduction of the LGP-30

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):65 - 73
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (1279 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    To re-create the University of Alberta's computing milieu of some 40 years ago, this article surveys the university's computational procedures before the arrival of the first computer and discusses the university's acquisition and use of the LGP-30 View full abstract»

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  • Stanford, the IBM 650, and the First Trials of Computer Date Matching

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):74 - 80
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (161 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    In 1959, two Stanford undergraduate electrical engineering students enrolled in Math 139, theory and operation of computing machines, and as a final class project, devised the "Happy Families Planning Service". They used the IBM model 650 computer, pairing up 49 men and 49 women, for the first known computer-date-matched party View full abstract»

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  • Events and Sightings

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):81 - 84
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  • Computer Recollections: Events, Humor, and Happenings

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):85 - 89
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  • Jack Kilby (1923-2005)

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):90 - 95
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  • Reviews

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s):96 - 99
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  • Mapping Cyberspace: The Image of the Internet

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s): 100
    Request permission for commercial reuse | Click to expandAbstract | PDF file iconPDF (405 KB) | HTML iconHTML

    Why would anyone try to map the Internet in the first place? What purpose do speculations on the unrealized physical form of amorphous electronic data serve? The straightforward answer is that maps are a handy tool for organizing and communicating large amounts of information. To say one is "on the Internet" today means something much different than it meant 15 years ago, and the rapid pace of cha... View full abstract»

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  • [Back cover]

    Publication Year: 2007, Page(s): c4
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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing serves as a record of vital contributions which recount, preserve, and analyze the history of computing and the impact of computing on society.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Nathan Ensmenger
Indiana University, School of Informatics & Computing
nensmeng@indiana.edu