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Aerospace and Navigational Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1961

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aerospace and Navigational Electronics

    Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 45
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  • The Editor Reports

    Page(s): 46
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  • 1961 Pioneer Award in Aerospace and Navigational Electronics

    Page(s): 47 - 50
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  • Control Concepts of the AN/GSN-11 Terminal Air Traffic Control System

    Page(s): 51 - 59
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    Capabilities of a newly completed terminal-area air traffic control system are discussed, in terms of recent theories of flow control. Adaptability of the system to gain the benefits of early arrival scheduling, time separation, sequencing, schedule resolution, shortest common path, dual and crossing runways is described. The author defends close-control vectoring as the only means to achieving both improved safety and increased traffic rate and discusses the system's philosophy of increasing precision with decreasing range. Getting back to the pilot, means by which the system simplifies approach procedures, reduces congestion aloft, and provides continuous radar tracking are also discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Logarithmic Navigation for Precise Guidance of Space Vehicles

    Page(s): 59 - 71
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    The principles of logarithmic guidance are derived and their application to various space-flight guidance problems is discussed. Logarithmic guidance is shown to be ideal during the terminus of control where considerations of minimum fuel, minimum heating etc., can be subordinated to precise matching of vehicle kinematics to the desired trajectory. This precise trajectory control is achieved utilizing velocity and position measurements to govern the vehicle deceleration. Multidimensional effects are considered and it is shown that various ¿degrees of control¿ of velocity vector magnitude and angle, time of arrival, accelerations, geographical or inertial directions of approach, etc., can be achieved. The tolerance of logarithmic guidance to instrumentation errors and parameter variations are confirmed by error analyses of these guidance principles applied to the control of the velocity vector during the deceleration process. View full abstract»

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  • Optimization of a Generalized Velocity-Inertial System

    Page(s): 72 - 77
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    In this paper the variational calculus techniques of the Wiener-Kolmogoroff optimum filter theory are employed to develop the statistically optimum form of a generalized hybrid velocity-inertial system. A velocity-inertial system is considered which is general in both form and application. The form of the system encompasses pure inertial, pure Doppler, and a large family of Doppler- inertial hybrid systems including the present-day second-and thirdorder Doppler inertial navigation and stabilization systems. The system may be used for a wide range of applications including any linear combination of acceleration, velocity, or vertical-reference sensing. The general system form is developed by employing an unspecified filter to mix the inertially derived signal with the signal from the auxiliary velocity sensor. As a result of utilizing this general system form, a single general error equation is found which represents the system error for each of the above system forms and applications. Using a linear analysis and the minimum mean-square error criteria, an optimum system form is found for the complete range of possible system applications. View full abstract»

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  • Abstracts

    Page(s): 78
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  • PGANE News

    Page(s): 79 - 80
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 81
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  • Roster of PGANE Members

    Page(s): 82 - 88
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  • Suggestions to Authors

    Page(s): 88a
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  • Institutional listings

    Page(s): 88b
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1962. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

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