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Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 1958

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  • IRE Transactions on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): c1
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  • IRE Professional Group on Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): c2
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  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 1
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  • Frontispiece

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 2
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  • Cooling Airborne Electronics

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 3
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  • General Aspects of Cooling Airborne Electronic Equipment

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 4 - 9
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    A brief introduction and review is presented of the problems of protecting and cooling airborne electronic equipment in present and future high-speed devices. The thermal characteristics associated with high-speed flight of manned and unmanned vehicles are related to the thermal problems of irreversible electrical and magnetic components which possess upper bounds of temperature for reliable operation. Various types of cooling devices, fluid flow processes, and techniques are presented and discussed, and the trends of future development are reviewed briefly. View full abstract»

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  • Problems Arising in High-Speed Aircraft Due to Cooling Requirements of Electronic Equipment

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 10 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    High-speed aircraft require the successful operation of large quantities of electronic equipment. The problem of providing a suitable environment for such equipment is of interest to both airplane and electronic designers. A proposal is offered by which cooling provisions may be standardized for airplanes of widely varying performance. Basic design parameters for the development of such a system are outlined, as are the economic factors involved. View full abstract»

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  • Temperature Limits, Ratings, and Natural Cooling Procedures for Avionic Equipment and Parts

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 15 - 24
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    The results of adequate cooling of electronic parts are gains in part life and reliability. An engineering compromise between ideal electronic part temperature and the thermal point of diminishing return must be evaluated not only with respect to desired life, but also in terms of the electronic circuit and cooling efficiencies. This paper outlines the flow of heat within, through, and from heat producing electronic parts in terms of internal thermal limitations, part surface and environmental ratings, and cooling indices. Natural heat flow design data pertinent to conduction cooling of heat sources, tube shields, the placement and mounting of parts, and ¿sink connectors¿ are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Forced-Air Direct-Contact Cooling of Airborne Electronic Equipment

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 25 - 29
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    A brief explanation of the principles of forced-air direct-contact cooling is given, and it is shown that the heat density of the electronic part being cooled determines essentially the range of applicability of this method. The discussion then progresses to cooling problems arising when this concept is applied to airborne electronic equipment. Several techniques are presented for obtaining high heat transfer coefficients and good air distribution with small pressure drops. The use of laminar flow in all of these techniques is shown to be effective, and examples are given of practical applications, such as the use of tube shields and special solenoid designs. Applications of thermal insulation to forced-air direct-contact cooling in aircraft are also treated, and the shortcomings, as well as the advantages of forced-air direct-contact cooling, are pointed out. View full abstract»

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  • Cold Plate Design for Airborne Electronic Equipment

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 30 - 35
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    A solution to the problem of cooling certain types of high heat-dissipating airborne electronic equipment is the modification of the equipment chassis to incorporate a simple plate-fin heat exchanger, sometimes called a ¿cold plate.¿ In this paper equations for cold plates are developed and the effect of variations in fin configuration on performance are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results based on tubes mounted on a cold plate are found to compare very favorably. The application of the cold-plate technique is illustrated for power transistors. This method of cooling is shown to be useful and efficient. View full abstract»

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  • Why and How Should High-Speed Aircraft Electronics Be Liquid Cooled?

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 36 - 46
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    Based on weight penality comparisons of ultimate heat sinks for electronic equipment cooling, the use of expendable evaporants and fuel is indicated for high supersonic flight. Centralized ram air should be the alternate coolant during subsonic flight. System integration is best accomplished with a recirculating liquid transfer system, which is relatively easy to control and which is characterized by small pumping power, line size, and heat gain from high temperature environments. Because of these features close temperature control of dispersed components and cooling of remote highpower units are best achieved by liquid coupling, regardless of the type of ultimate heat sink. Part temperature rises in high voltage equipment can be minimized by use of dielectric liquids. Although this permits some reduction in ultimnate coolant weight penalty, the reduction is usually not great enough to offset the equipment weight increases that are due to liquid filling. Vapor-filled or air-filled units with minimal liquid contents and liquid transport to part surfaces by capillary action or mechanical means are superior. Electronic assemblies that are to be series cooled in sealed liquid transfer systems should be designed for conduction, forced air convection, or radiation heat transfer from the parts, and high power units should have integral liquid cooled heat exchangers, placed in separate transfer system branches. Internal heat transfer in such units may be attained by conduction through flexible metal or rubber jackets and electrical insulators, by air convection in standard modules, and by liquid film cooling. View full abstract»

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  • An Evaporative-Gravity Technique for Airborne Equipment Cooling

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 47 - 52
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    In airborne electronic packages, for either thermal or electrical reasons cooling air often is not ducted directly over the components but is passed through a heat exchanger. Consequently, the thermal path between the heat exchanger and the components must be of low impedance to result in efficient heat transfer. The high heat transfer coefficients obtainable as a liquid boils and condenses permit an effective reduction of the temperature drop between the electronic components and the heat exchanger. In this paper the development and design of an evaporative system utilizing gravity return flow is discussed, and the test results of such a system are compared with those obtained utilizing a conventional metallic conductive paths technique. Where heat dissipation or cooling air inlet temperature is high, the evaporative-gravity (ev-grav) system is shown to be the most effective. View full abstract»

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  • Temperature Measurement

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 52 - 57
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    The quality of heat transfer data depends, to a large extent, on the accuracy of temperature measurements. Errors in temperature measurement may be due to calibration errors and/or application errors. This paper describes some common methods of temperature measurement and estimates the precision commonly attainable with these devices. The calibration of thermometers is also discussed. The problems of surface temperature measurement, fluid temperature measurement, and bulk temperature measurement are discussed in some detail and some specific examples are included. View full abstract»

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  • Radio Rack Cooling in Present Commercial Aircraft

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 58 - 63
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    Limited heat dissipation from the necessarily compact electronic equipment installations of airline aircraft has been a problem to commercial air carriers for many years. To deal with this problem, United Air Lines, in August, 1955, began equipping fleet aircraft with a forced air electronic equipment cooling system, with the following objectives: 1) improvement of electronic equipment reliability, 2) reduction of crew discomfort caused by electronic-equipment generated heat in the flight deck area, and 3) evacuation of any smoke from the flight deck area which might arise from electronic equipment failure. Observation of electronic equipment maintenance records during the subsequent transition period from convection to forced air equipment cooling shows characteristic failure rate trends which indicate the dependence of equipment reliability on operating temperature. These patterns occur independently in fleet records for the Convair 340, and DC-6 and DC-6B fleets, in time phase with the progress of conversion to forced air cooling in the fleet. These records, in conjunction with other comparative testing of forced cooled and convective cooled equipment installations indicate that forced air cooling provides an effective answer to airline equipment heat problems. View full abstract»

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  • Radiation Pattern Efficiencies of Some Suppressed HF Aircraft Antennas

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 64
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  • Abstracts

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 65
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  • PGANE News

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 66 - 68
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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 69 - 70
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  • Suggestions to authors

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 71
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1958 , Page(s): 71a
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope