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Aeronautical and Navigational Electronics, IRE Transactions on

Issue 1 • Date March 1956

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Displaying Results 1 - 13 of 13
  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): c1
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 1
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  • James L. Dennis

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 2
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  • The Practical Combination of Air Navigation Techniques

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 3 - 10
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Neither airborne self-contained nor ground-based air-navigation systems can by themselves completely meet the requirements of present day aircraft for both accuracy and continuity or positional and steering data. It is shown how dead-reckoning, providing continuity and reliability through the use of air-derived acceleration or velocity data, combined with intermittent ``fixing'' by employment of accurate position data obtained through the use of ground and stellar referenced sources, can increase operational capability without ``pressing the state of the art'' in any of the components of a system. Methods of inserting position fixes and of instrumenting the associated wind-computation and wind-memory functions are described and system errors are analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • The Problems of Transition to Single Sideband Techniques in Aeronautical Communications

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 10 - 16
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    Neither airborne self-contained nor ground-based air-navigation systems can by themselves completely meet the requirements of present day aircraft for both accuracy and continuity or positional and steering data. It is shown how dead-reckoning, providing continuity and reliability through the use of air-derived acceleration or velocity data, combined with intermittent ¿fixing¿ by employment of accurate position data obtained through the use of ground and stellar referenced sources, can increase operational capability without ¿pressing the state of the art¿ in any of the components of a system. Methods of inserting position fixes and of instrumenting the associated wind-computation and wind-memory functions are described and system errors are analyzed. View full abstract»

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  • Reliability Through Redundancy

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 16 - 20
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1096 KB)  

    As requirements for automaticity cause airborne electronic systems to grow in complexity, reliability tends to become a limiting factor to system success. Because of the small probability that a large number of components will all operate successfully at once, even though individual reliabilities are high, complex systems are inherently unreliable. Efforts to better system reliability through improvement of component reliability rapidly reach the point of diminishing returns. A more fruitful solution to the problem is the redundant use of parts of the system in such a way that the function of a malfunctioning assembly is assumed by another assembly. The ``probability of no failure'' barrier is by-passed by this method, and a large improvement of in-flight reliability can be obtained with relatively small increase of system complexity. The potential of method is illustrated by a reliability analysis of a theoretical system, its application in design of a system is outlined, and techniques of detecting system failures and initiating corrective action are discussed. View full abstract»

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  • Some Operational Advantages of Pictorial Navigation Displays

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 21 - 28
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    In the preparation of an evaluation program for several pictorial navigation displays, developed under sponsorship of the Air Navigation Development Board, it was necessary to make a study of possible operational advantages of the use of such displays. When compared to conventional symbolic instrumentation for displaying navigation information, the pictorial displays appear to have three primary advantages: 1) Continuous usable navigation information is supplied to the pilot in all airspace within range of the ground radio facilities. 2) Navigation workload on the flight crew is materially reduced. 3) A reduction in number of ground radio aids should be possible if most aircraft were equipped with pictorial navigation displays. Brief description of several pictorial computers is included. View full abstract»

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  • An Evaluation of High Frequency Antennas for a Large Jet Airplane

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 28 - 32
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    The ability of aircraft cap-type high frequency antennas to act as efficient radiators is a subject of much current interest. In most instances the fixed-wire type hf antenna is incorrectly assumed to be superior to flush cap-type antennas. In this paper a performance comparison of five different hf communication antenna configurations for a large high speed aircraft is presented. These antennas include two fixed-wire types, a conventional tail-cap type, and two ``L-gap'' tail-cap configurations. The impedance vs frequency characteristic is explored over the 2-24 mc range for each antenna. The antenna system efficiency of each antenna is computed using the antenna impedance characteristic and considering the transmission line, coupling network, antenna feed and lightning protection system, and the antenna radiation pattern. This antenna system efficiency is then used as a basis for comparison of the five antennas. View full abstract»

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  • Experimental Determination of TACAN Bearing and Distance Accuracy

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 33 - 36
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    The ability of aircraft cap-type high frequency antennas to act as efficient radiators is a subject of much current interest. In Most instances the fixed-wire type hf antenna is incorrectly assumed to be superior to flush cap-type antennas. In this paper a Performance comparison of five different hf communication antenna configurations for a large high speed aircraft is presented. These antennas include two fixed-wire types, a conventional tail-cap type, and two ¿L-gap¿ tail-cap configurations. The impedance vs frequency characteristic is explored over the 2-24 mc range for each antenna. The antenna system efficiency of each antenna is computed using the antenna impedance characteristic and considering the transmission line, coupling network, antenna feed and lightning protection system, and the antenna radiation pattern. This antenna system efficiency is then used as a basis for comparison of the five antennas. View full abstract»

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  • Radio Beam Coupler System

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 36 - 41
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    The radio beam coupler system has been recently developed as an en route navigation and approach aid for modem transport and bombing aircraft. It is applicable to both military and commercial operations. The system comprises an electronic amplifier and cockpit switching elements for coupling the automatic pilot to VOR and ILS radio facilities. Accuracy and efficiency of control is improved over previous systems while automatic sequencing and sensing simplify the human pilot's operating procedures. Design features such as magnetic components and hermetic sealing enhance the reliability of the amplifier unit. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 41 - 42
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  • [Front cover]

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1956 , Page(s): 42a - 42b
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1960. The new retitled publication is IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems.

Full Aims & Scope