By Topic

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, IEEE

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1988

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Current status of rehabilitation engineering/technology

    Page(s): 9 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (211 KB)  

    An overview is given of the development of rehabilitation engineering, and the founding of the Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America (RESNA) is discussed. A listing is given of 16 special interest groups that are in charge of the various scientific, engineering, and technological areas covered by rehabilitation engineering. Current trends in the field are identified.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rehabilitation engineering: towards a systematic process

    Page(s): 11 - 15
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (647 KB)  

    Two parts of the rehabilitation engineering process, client assessment and task analysis, are examined, and an approach to further delineate and systematize these components is described. The tasks of the rehabilitation engineer are taken to be the selection of appropriate available assistive devices and the design of new devices that will enable a handicapped client to accomplish a life task for which he or she would otherwise by physically disabled. Generalizable concepts and speculations on new tools that are perceived to be needed to help rehabilitation engineers do their job are emphasized. Human performance concepts are used as a basis for analyzing processes. Analogies from traditional engineering design and practice are used for insight.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Biomechanical quantification for assessment and diagnosis of dysphagia

    Page(s): 16 - 20
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (919 KB)  

    The swallowing process is divided into three distinct phases: (1) an oral phase involving the coordinated action of the muscles of the lips, tongue, and cheeks; (2) a pharyngeal phase involving pharynx and larynx; and (3) an esophageal phase involving transit of the bolus from the pharynx into the stomach. A description is given of quantitative measurement techniques for assessment of the oral phase and reliable, noninvasive techniques for assessing the pharyngeal phase that are being developed. The goal is to identify the patient at risk of aspiration and choking.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Technological devices for deaf-blind children: needs and potential impact

    Page(s): 25 - 29
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (746 KB)  

    The authors provide a glimpse into the world of congenitally deaf-blind children and how the application of technology might enable them to lead more productive lives. They describe this population and then summarize the present status of efforts to educate and communicate with them. A review of technological devices presently usable and potentially usable to complement these efforts is given. The authors conclude with a list of technological tools that are needed for communication with deaf-blind persons.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Rhythm perception equipment for skin vibratory stimulation

    Page(s): 30 - 34
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (666 KB)  

    The characteristics of vibrotactile stimulation and an experimental device for the transmission of rhythm information contained in music and similar sounds by means of vibrotactile stimulation are described. The actuator and input/output behavior of the device are examined. Measurement of the intensity discrimination threshold and beat frequency perception threshold is discussed. Application to music education in schools for the deaf is described, and results of a clinical test are reported.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Clinical gait analysis

    Page(s): 35 - 40
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (762 KB)  

    Technologies and techniques that have evolved to aid in the assessment of human locomotion and some of the difficulties associated with the clinical application of quantitative gait analysis are examined. The parameters used for the clinical description of gait are outlined, and examples of application of clinical gait analysis are listed. Problems encountered in measuring and assessing gait patterns are discussed. Some commercially available motion measurement systems are described. Future research directions are suggested.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Control law decoupling for 2-D biped walking system

    Page(s): 41 - 45
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (427 KB)  

    An explicit form of decoupled controls of a 2-D biped walking system is developed for use in simulation studies. The Lagrangian for an n-link 2-D biped system is first set down. The Lagrange formalism is then written as a state-space representation and a block-diagram scheme is proposed. Next, the direct nonlinear decoupling method is introduced, and an explicit form of generating rules is derived. The pole assignment problem is considered. The case of an n-degree of freedom biped system is investigated.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Advances in wheelchair technology

    Page(s): 21 - 24
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (763 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine contains articles on current technologies and methods used in biomedical and clinical engineering.

 

This Magazine ceased publication in 2010. The current retitled publication is IEEE Pulse.

Full Aims & Scope