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Engineering Management, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 28
  • Table of contents

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C1
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management publication information

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): C2
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  • From the Editor

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 217 - 218
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  • Toward a Product System Modularity Construct: Literature Review and Reconceptualization

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 219 - 240
    Cited by:  Papers (9)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1604 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Product modularity has been discussed in engineering and management literature for over forty years. During this time span, definitions and views on the meaning of product modularity proliferated to the extent that it is difficult to understand the essential traits of the concept. While definitional ambiguity is often a byproduct of academic debate, it hinders the advancement of scientific knowledge as well. This paper aims to move a step forward toward a more precise definition of product modularity, by articulating a product system modularity construct in the domain of tangible, assembled artifacts. More precisely, the paper constitutively defines product modularity in terms of component separability and component combinability. An indirect operational definition for product modularity is then proposed by operationalizing component separability and component combinability. The proposed definition is finally related to other definitional perspectives synthesized by a literature review: component commonality, function binding, interface standardization, and loose coupling. In this way, the nomological network of the product modularity construct is laid out. Construct validation activities are left to further research View full abstract»

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  • The Influence of New Product Development Competitive Capabilities on Project Performance

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 241 - 256
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (565 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This paper investigates the relationships between new product development (NPD) competitive capabilities and project performance. Using data from a large sample of NPD projects, both direct and synergistic influences of new product development competitive capabilities on project performance are explored. The results support the claim of the synergy school that simultaneous pursuit of multiple competitive capabilities enhances NPD project success. For example, time-to-market and conformance quality were directly and significantly related to all measures of NPD project success. Also, the interactions of conformance quality and cost, conformance quality and time-to-market, and product cost and time-to-market were found to influence different measures of NPD project success. Implications of the results for theory and managerial practice are offered View full abstract»

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  • Industry-University IP Relations: Integrating Perspectives and Policy Solutions

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 257 - 267
    Cited by:  Papers (6)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (429 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Despite a long and productive U.S. history, industry-university (I-U) relations have become increasingly testy around intellectual property (IP). The Bayh-Dole Act is cited the driver for sharply increased university patenting, less fundamental research focus, and disinterest in traditional missions, although there is little data to corroborate these conclusions. A National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored workshop points to I-U relationship issues in the context of the path a new technology must follow from lab to market. We propose some critical variables affecting I-U IP relationships; describe areas of agreement and contention between the parties, drawing also on secondary data and the broader literature of I-U relations; and offer IP policy observations of interest to universities, researchers and technology transfer managers, their industry counterparts, and government. We end with propositions for further research View full abstract»

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  • Exploring Ambidextrous Innovation Tendencies in the Adoption of Telecommunications Technologies

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 268 - 285
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2243 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    As the importance of information technology has increased within the business domain, so too has the significance of innovating within those information technologies. The recent proliferation of telecommunications technologies, coupled with conventional information technology, has resulted in a new class of applications with important competitive implications. An important issue for organizations, then, is the causal sequence that leads to more innovative telecommunications adoption. Previous innovation research has shown radical and incremental innovation employing vastly different strategy-structure sequence configurations. Two proposals have been offered on how an organization can effectively innovate incrementally and radically: first, through the use of semi-structures, and second, by utilizing both configurations simultaneously, termed ambidextrous. This paper seeks 1) to determine whether organizations are balancing innovation efforts, and 2) if so, are organizations managing the effort using semi-structures or an ambidextrous approach. The research is conducted within the telecommunications industry by employing theoretical typologies of radical and incremental innovation developed in the literature. Based on a sample of 154 organizations the findings suggest that organizations are indeed using a balanced approach to overall innovativeness by using paradoxical, dual models of innovation simultaneously. Implications for researchers and practitioners are discussed View full abstract»

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  • Systems Development Process Improvement: A Knowledge Integration Perspective

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 286 - 300
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1524 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although organizations have applied a variety of practices and tools to address information systems development (ISD) performance problems, most of these approaches have focused on controlling and improving predictability of the development process. There is growing recognition that ISD is a knowledge-intensive process that requires the integration of specialized stakeholder knowledge. We develop the perspective that integration of this specialized knowledge across knowledge boundaries in the ISD process drives ISD performance. We theorize that formal and informal organizational integrative practices influence ISD performance, because they facilitate the development of boundary objects that effectively span knowledge boundaries. Results from a field study of 110 firms provide considerable support for the proposed model. This paper makes three novel contributions to the technology management literature. First, it demonstrates that knowledge integration across knowledge boundaries through boundary objects improves ISD performance. Second, it shows how formal and informal organizational integrative practices enhance the integration of specialized knowledge within and across organizational subunits. Third, it shows that the positive influence of formal and informal organizational integrative practices on ISD performance is partially mediated by knowledge integration. For engineering and technology managers, the results highlight the centrality of knowledge integration for the management of technology development. Collectively, these findings offer a novel knowledge integration-based perspective that complements prior research on systems development and new product development View full abstract»

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  • Analyzing the Success Drivers of e-Business Companies

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 301 - 314
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1040 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Although there is a growing amount of theoretical literature, only limited attention has been allocated to empirically determine the relative influence of a broad set of strategic success factors of e-business companies across several industries. We concentrate on the impact of marketing strategies and chosen business models and differentiate between direct and indirect drivers on revenue and profitability in order to estimate the total effect of a certain strategy or business model. Based on a survey of 147 e-businesses from different industries we empirically test, with the help of seemingly unrelated regression models, the relative importance of the various strategy elements. Our estimation results show that business models where the firm profits from transactions (e.g., via fixed access or usage fees) and is able to sell pricy products and services are well suited to reach profitability. The by far most important element of the marketing strategy is the achieved customer satisfaction, which has a significant and strong effect on revenue, but only a moderate direct effect on profitability. Due to our modeling approach we find that the total elasticity of this element of the marketing strategy is driven by the indirect effect from revenue on profitability View full abstract»

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  • The Influence of Experience and Information Search Styles on Project Risk Identification Performance

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 315 - 326
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1676 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The management of risks in projects is a growing area of concern. Both the identification and analysis phases of the risk management process are considered the most important, for they can have a big effect on the precision of the risk assessment exercise. Currently, it is assumed that project managers rely largely on experience to identify project risks. These decisions, influenced by individual perception and attitudes, are made primarily under conditions of uncertainty. Understanding how individuals respond to uncertain situations, therefore, requires an understanding of how individuals intuitively assess the situation they perceive, before expressing a response. The Project Risk Identification (Pro-RIde) project interviewed 51 project managers using active information search (AIS) as a data collection method and cognitive mapping as a data-capturing tool. Our results suggest that the role of experience in the risk identification process is much less significant than it is commonly assumed to be. By contrast, information search style, level of education and risk management training do play a significant role in risk identification performance. These findings suggest the potential for a more thorough approach to risk identification View full abstract»

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  • Using Nonadditive Fuzzy Integral to Assess Performances of Organizational Transformation Via Communities of Practice

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 327 - 339
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (740 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Organizational transformations have been widely adopted by firms who wish to improve their competitive advantage to be better prepared to face external challenges. This research has chosen Communities of Practice (CoPs) as the subject of discussion for an assessment model to reform organizations that undertake CoPs for collective knowledge to enhance their core competencies. Given the interrelationships between criteria, this research uses the nonadditive fuzzy integral to develop a framework for the CoPs performance assessment. The purposes of this paper are to identify the key dimensions/criteria in the CoPs, to use fuzzy logic method to analyze the relative importance of each criterion, and to rank the criteria so that proper resources can be allocated while managing the CoPs. Through interviews with experts, four strategy alternatives and 16 criteria along four dimensions are generated. A survey of the CoPs practitioners is then conducted to compare the results of each criterion. The results will not only help organizations that intend to initiate changes via the CoPs activities to decide the ranking of their appraisal criteria, but it can also assist them in guiding the behavior of their staff while effectively monitoring and improving the performances of the CoPs View full abstract»

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  • Managing Competencies in Breakthrough Product Development: A Comparative Study of Two Material Processing Projects

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 340 - 350
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (514 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Managers face many challenges as they bring breakthrough products to market. Increasing pressures for short-term returns often make these longer-term, breakthrough product development projects less attractive. At the same time, the array of external sourcing options available to managers has grown dramatically over the last decade, allowing firms to outsource more and more of their core processes. Taken together, managers often find it appealing to minimize their internal exposure to breakthrough projects, instead choosing to either focus on incremental projects (with quicker, more certain paybacks), or to outsource the high risk elements of these breakthrough projects. Although outsourcing decreases risk, it also allows other firms to develop critical expertise and competence. As such, there is an increasing need for strategies that help firms build new core competencies as they move these breakthrough projects forward. Significant gaps exist in understanding what kinds of competencies emerge and how to manage them in the context of breakthrough product development. As such, the primary objective of this study is to explore and document the development and management of these competencies within the context of materials processing firms undergoing breakthrough innovation. Utilizing a multi-case perspective allows for the delineation of common elements within these domains that provided their respective firms advantage. The findings of this study are put forth as propositions and support the notion that managers need to be cognizant of three domains of competencies (market, technology, and integrative) (Coates and McDermott, 2002; Danneels, 2002), that emerge from breakthrough innovations View full abstract»

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  • Towards Theory Building in Agile Manufacturing Strategy—A Taxonomical Approach

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 351 - 370
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1219 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Agility has been widely accepted in manufacturing industry as a new competitive concept. However, how to develop a manufacturing strategy based around agility is not fully understood. This paper proposes a framework for the implementation of agility as a manufacturing strategy and describes the development and analysis of a numerical taxonomy of agility strategies using the framework. The taxonomy was developed with cluster analysis based on the relative importance attached to seven agility capabilities by a number of U.K. manufacturing companies. Three distinct clusters of strategy groups were observed across the industry studied: Quick, Responsive and Proactive Players. Quick Players are oriented towards a strong customer focus and quickness. They do not emphasize flexibility and responsiveness to changes and they give low priority to proactiveness and partnership. Responsive Players are preoccupied with flexibility and responsiveness to changes. They do not emphasize proactiveness and partnerships and they attach low importance to quickness. Proactive Players are characterized by high priorities on proactiveness and customer focus, high values attached to all capabilities, and high importance given to partnerships. The underlying dimensions of agile capabilities along which the three strategy groups differ were investigated based on factor analysis and canonical discriminant analysis. Changes/uncertainties in the business environment experienced by members of different strategic groups were compared, and "manufacturing strategy choices," in terms of manufacturing practices for achieving agility, employed by members of different strategic groups were studied. Business characteristics and typical cases for each strategy group were investigated View full abstract»

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  • The Complementary Role of Dominant Designs and Industry Standards

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 371 - 379
    Cited by:  Papers (3)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (309 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Models of competition in innovative and standard-based industries have advanced considerably in recent years. Two terms that have become important competitive considerations are dominant designs and industry standards. This paper describes the potential for confusion between dominant designs and industry standards and attempts to clearly delineate between them. The role of standards is narrowly driven by the relative importance of network effects while dominant designs are persistent architectures with established implications for industries. However, standards are often important elements of dominant designs. There are many implications of this distinct, yet complementary, relationship between standards and dominant designs for managers. Perhaps the most important is that while dominant designs have been shown to presage industry shake outs, standards do not. In addition, a firm that establishes a dominant design does not often appear to reap competitive advantages from it, though one that establishes a standard may. Other implications for managers from this distinction are also discussed, including corporate strategy and first mover advantage View full abstract»

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  • Integration of Kano's Model Into QFD for Multiple Product Design

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 380 - 390
    Cited by:  Papers (7)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (601 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Simultaneous multiple product design is essential to meet customer expectations faster and with a focus on shortening life cycles, and new methodologies are needed to address the complexities related to it. quality function deployment (QFD) can help gather customer needs and link them to product design. However, understanding customer needs accurately is a challenge for traditional QFD analysis, and for this reason, Kano's model of customer satisfaction is associated with QFD in the literature. However, incorporating the results of Kano's model into QFD presents another challenge. The objective of this research is to provide a step-by-step methodology that fine-tunes the QFD method by combining Kano's model and QFD in a robust manner, from the perspective of simultaneous multiple product design. This research also includes an application of this proposed methodology on cockpit weather information system (CWIS) design, a part of NASA's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) project, to demonstrate its usefulness View full abstract»

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  • Kerzner's Project Management Logic Puzzles (Kerzner, H.; 2006)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 391
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  • Project Management Best Practices: Achieving Global Excellence (Kerzner, H.; 2006)

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 391 - 392
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  • Forthcoming Engineering Management Conferences

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 393
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  • IEEE International Engineering Management Conference 2007

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 394
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  • Special interest groups for the IEEE Engineering Management Society

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 395
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  • Papers to be Published in Future Issues of IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 396 - 398
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  • IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management - readership survey

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 399 - 400
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  • Special issue on managing innovation in emerging economies

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 401
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  • Call for case study proposals on managing engineering, technology, and innovation

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 402
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  • IEEE Engineering Management Society: Call For Awards Nominations

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 403
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Aims & Scope

Management of technical functions such as research, development, and engineering in industry, government, university, and other settings. Emphasis is on studies carried on within an organization to help in decision making or policy formation for RD&E. 

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Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Rajiv Sabherwal
Sam M. Walton College of Business, University of Arkansas