By Topic

Industry Applications, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date May 1975

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 19 of 19
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (943 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Industry Applications Society

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (251 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Standards -- Activities and Challenges

    Page(s): 249 - 251
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1712 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A Megawatt Converter with Ride-Through Fault Capability

    Page(s): 252 - 255
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1490 KB)  

    Protecting thyristors by means of fuses in electro-chemical rectifiers where more than 100 devices are used in a single unit may cause considerable service interruption when fuses open during temporary faults. This paper considers the thyristor and fuse ratings in conjunction with gate suppression techniques to achieve a protective system which allows a 17.5 MW rectifier to ``ride through'' momentary faults without service interruptions. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Harmonic Line Currents in Large Thyristor Six-Pulse Converters

    Page(s): 256 - 262
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1828 KB)  

    A guide to the generated line currents from six-pulse converters is presented. Included are the effects of commutating reactance, phase angle retard, partially inductive loads, and general comments on plant distribution layout, especially electrochemical plants. It is intended as a concise general guide to predicting the level of harmonics to be expected in a specific case, and as a guide in minimizing the occurrence of the more complex circuit effects of a total system. Harmonic currents in large thyristor converters, Megaverters ®, are found to be not significantly greater than in diode converters; however, more care must be given to plant layout of multiphase systems in order to benefit from the attempt at harmonic reduction. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A 50-MW Thyristor Controlled Power Converter

    Page(s): 263 - 266
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1724 KB)  

    In recent years, the use of thyristors for regulation of bulk power has grown appreciably. The Megaverter ® (Megawatt Power Converter) utilizes the thyristor for control and rectification to supply 52.5 MW of dc power for electrochemical use. The system consists of three Megaverters, each rated at 17.5 MW, connected in parallel. The thyristor assemblies are sized for worst-case short circuit surge, thereby providing maximum protection for critical components and eliminating costly downtime through nuisance tripping. Aluminum extrusion is used for the thyristor cabinet, allowing modular construction, reduction in size, and maximum design flexibility. Aluminum is also used for busbar and the thyristor water-cooled heatsink assemblies. The overall design approach results in simplified maintenance, reduced downtime, and simplicity of control for large thyristor controlled power converters. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electric Motor Vibration-Cause, Prevention, and Cure

    Page(s): 267 - 275
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (5995 KB)  

    The trend of industry toward higher speed machines and longer periods between downtimes has fostered closer surveillance of those parameters that can interrupt satisfactory service. Vibration of electric motors and systems containing motors are areas identified for consideration. Electric motor vibration is discussed from the viewpoint of its causes and cures. Also covered are the important considerations in establishing purchase specifications consistent with final installation requirements. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • A New Type DC Motor

    Page(s): 276 - 281
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (7947 KB)  

    A new and unique type of de motor is described whose construction includes a rotating permanent magnet field and a stationary wound structure together with a radically different mechanism for commutating the stationary winding. Design features of rotating magnet structures and the commutating mechanism are presented. Performance characteristics of an actual motor are shown. Also described are the changes in performance that can be realized by design variations in the amount of copper in the stator. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Economics of AC Adjustable Speed Drives on Pumps

    Page(s): 282 - 286
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2268 KB)  

    Flow control of pumps with adjustable speed ac drives can be very economical. Pump and system head/flow characteristics are reviewed, with suggestions for estimating the pump characteristic and efficiency at reduced speed. Generalized pump and savings curves are then developed to permit quick checking of the economics of adjustable speed flow control for various system characteristics. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Solid-State Control-Low Voltage Heating of Motors

    Page(s): 287 - 290
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3244 KB)  

    In recent years, industrial plants have been utilizing more electric motors as drivers because of their high efficiency and reliability and lower maintenance costs. Electrified continuous process plants are using electric motors for both primary and standby drives. When these standby motors are not operating during normal plant runs, their windings collect moisture. Moisture attacks insulation and causes insulation failure. A breakdown of motor insulation may occur when a standby motor is suddenly energized to take the place of the primary motor. When it is not in operation, directly heating the motor winding with a low voltage system, coupled with automatic control, will guard the motor from moisture attack and extend its service life. The experience with low voltage heating of motor windings as described by M. H. Yuen in his article [1] has proved its effectiveness. However, conventional relays, timers, contactors, etc., were utilized in the circuits. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Machine Control Selection -- A Choice or a Dilemma

    Page(s): 291 - 295
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2255 KB)  

    A user's experience in applying hard-wired logic and programmable logic controls is presented. Initial assumptions will be compared with the end result. Aspects to be covered include initial costs, design time, development time, and turnover to maintenance personnel. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Process Control Protection Against Power Line Interruptions

    Page(s): 296 - 300
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1818 KB)  

    Power dips, interruptions, and disturbances occur frequently throughout a plant power distribution system that adversely affect plant lighting, computers, process controls, and drive systems. Critical processes that must operate continuously require an uninterruptible power supply to protect against both long-and short-term interruptions. However, most industrial processes are not critical and need only be protected against power transients and short duration outages. Process equipment with properly supplied ride-through capability can prevent waste and downtime. It is the intent of this paper to discuss short duration power line disturbances; the type of , control and stored energy system available to protect against these disturbances; and the advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches available to ride through power line disturbances. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Fire-Retardant Cable Systems

    Page(s): 301 - 307
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2654 KB)  

    The increasing use of nonmetallic cables in cable trays for industrial plant applications as recognized in the 1975 National Electrical Code, Article 340, mandates that these cables be suitable for this application and that the outer sheath be flame-retardant. The significance of various flame tests is discussed, and data obtained following procedures and modifications of IEEE Standard 383-1974, Section 2.5, are presented. It is evident that nonmetallic sheathed tray cables are available that will comply. Furthermore, when a flame-resistant jacket is applied over type ALS, MC, or AC armored assemblies, it results in an exceptionally rugged, corrosion, and flame-resistant nonpropagating construction. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Outline of Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industry -- Suspension-Heater Flash-Furnace Clinker Burning Process

    Page(s): 308 - 313
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (9418 KB)  

    The suspension-preheater flash-furnace (SF) process for cement clinkering introduces a calcining flash furnace operating as an integral portion of a suspension preheater, rotary kiln, and clinker cooler system. Preheated raw meal from the suspension preheater is calcined in the flash furnace to 80 to 90 percent decarbonation. The capacity of the SF rotary kiln is increased thereby, since its function is limited to sintering rather than sintering and calcining. The flash furnace incorporates vortex flow to accomplish the mixing of fuel, raw meal, and gases. Effective distribution within the flash furnace limits temperature gradients and eliminates localized elevated temperatures that might otherwise lead to coating and material build-up. Hot combustion gases are recovered from the clinker cooler for use in the flash furnace. An orifice in the kiln gas exit duct serves to balance the parallel gas flows through the kiln and secondary air duct. Operating pressures and temperatures are described. The smaller size of the rotary kiln used in the SF process leads to extended refractory life as demonstrated by operating experience. The SF process is adaptable to the control of internal alkali, sulfur, and chlorine cycles through a gas bypass and through a unique material withdrawal arrangement from the flash furnace. Existing plants may be modified to incorporate the SF process. Nearly 20 commercial scale plants are operating or are being constructed. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Self-Controlled Variable Resistance Heating System

    Page(s): 314 - 318
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1707 KB)  

    The use of a variable resistance heating element to monitor the temperature of work and control heat input to the element is described. A solid-state controller that measures the element temperature by continuous monitoring of the element resistance i used to control the voltage input to the element. This eliminates separate temperature measuring device such as thermostat, thermo couple, or thermistor and associated wiring. In addition, the average temperature of the work is measured rather than the temperature of a single location. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Standardized Instrumentation System for Computer Automated Measurement and Control

    Page(s): 319 - 323
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3890 KB)  

    A standardized instrumentation system for computer automated measurement and control (CAMAC) is gaining wide international acceptance for industrial and laboratory applications. The system features a fully specified dataway together with modular functional units that are completely compatible with each other and that are available from diverse sources. The system is nonproprietary and can be freely used without license or restriction of any, kind. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • System Design Considerations when Using Computer-Independent Hardware

    Page(s): 324 - 327
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2281 KB)  

    There is a need for industrial control system designs to be less dependent upon the implementation and source of the various elements within the system, including the control computer. However, a number of system design considerations confront the user of computer-independent industrial control hardware. Various software implications and organizational considerations are discussed, along with hardware organization parameters. Solutions to various software and system problems are proposed by applying the computer automated measurement and control (CAMAC) digital interface standard. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Electrical Characterization of a Corona Discharge for Surface Treatment

    Page(s): 328 - 335
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (4752 KB)  

    Electrical characterization is based on a display of voltage and charge which appears as a simple parallelogram. The area is a measure of energy input per cycle and is independent of voltage waveform but very dependent on the maximum voltage. A useful model for such corona discharges employs a Zener diode to simulate the corona drop. The buffer dielectric plays a major roll in controlling the corona power, and the air gap importance depends on the electrode system employed. Proper interpretation of the voltage-charge traces provides insight as to the corona performance and serves as a diagnostic procedure for obtaining optimum performance. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Industry Applications Society

    Page(s): 336
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (113 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

The scope of the IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRY APPLICATIONS includes all scope items of the IEEE Industry Applications Society, that is, the advancement of the theory and practice of electrical and electronic engineering in the development, design, manufacture, and application of electrical systems, apparatus, devices, and controls to the processes and equipment of industry and commerce; the promotion of safe, reliable, and economic installations; industry leadership in energy conservation and environmental, health, and safety issues; the creation of voluntary engineering standards and recommended practices; and the professional development of its membership.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Carlton E. Speck