By Topic

Communications Magazine, IEEE

Issue 4 • Date April 2007

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 10 of 10
  • Front cover - IEEE Applications and Practice - April 2007 [Online Magazine - A supplement to IEEE Communications Magazine]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (317 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of Contents - April 2007

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (33 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Why an applications and practice magazine? [Message from the Editor-in-Chief]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (115 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The unwinding of a protocol [Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 4 - 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (107 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    The ISO 18000 Part 6C UHF standard is becoming a widely accepted standard in RFID applications in supply chain management and is driving development of passive tags. The communication primitives of ISO 18000 Part 6C are significantly different and more complex than ISO 18000 Part 7. The complexity of the Part 6C standard makes the design of these tags extremely time consuming and challenging for reducing power consumption and silicon area. This article examines various features of the ISO Part 6C standard and compares it to the ISO Part 7 standard for active tags for the purpose of evaluating generic interrogator/tag protocol complexity. For a 0.16 mm ASIC implementation, the Query command from ISO 18000 Part 6C is more complex than 10 primitives of the simpler ISO 18000 Part 7 standard View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Bridging the gap [Centers of Excellence; Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 11
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (31 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Centers of Excellence rely on university staff and students to bring RFID technology out into the real world. This paper focused on making RFID more applicable in our everyday lives, individuals such as these are converging at the two dozen or so RFID Centers of Excellence that have sprouted up around world over the last two to three years. They have come in the wake of Wal-Mart and Department of Defense mandates that their suppliers use RFID technology. Unlike RFID labs, which are often run by equipment manufacturers themselves, Centers of Excellence-and there are a host of them specializing in different fields around the United States-are based in universities and staffed by faculty and students View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An overview and introduction to the RFID research center at the University of Arkansas [Centers of Excellence; Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 12 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (64 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Establishment of the University of Pittsburgh RFID center of excellence [Centers of Excellence; Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 14 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (235 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    This is the history of the establishment of the RFID Center of Excellence at the University of Pittsburgh, including the original conceptual framework and the milestones that made it a natural consequence of previous research and development View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • An exposure system for evaluating possible effects of RFID on various formulations of drug products [Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 17 - 23
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (726 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We developed hardware and software to perform exposure studies of the effects of certain RF electromagnetic fields on solid and liquid pharmaceuticals and biologies. The RF fields generated by our systems are similar to those emitted by RFID readers operating in the U.S. licensed HF and UHF bands. Our systems can expose drug samples (pharmaceuticals and biologies) to uniform electric (E) and/or magnetic (H) fields at levels that are much higher than those experienced by drugs near "worst-case" readers at a distance of 20 cm. Maximum field strengths near these readers were identified by measurements and computations of fields from commercial readers, and are extrapolated to the maximum allowable effective isotropic radiated power or field strength dictated by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission. Exposures can be performed for each drug in both its retail primary package and in 54 mm diameter culture dishes. The containers are suitable for exposing a wide variety of formulations of. Exposures of drugs in culture dishes ensure uniform induced electric fields and currents. In contrast, exposures in the primary containers allow studies that account for the interactions of RF fields with the packaging materials and container geometry. In our UHF system we can expose drugs to over 20 W effective isotropic radiated power, over five times the FCC limits. We evaluated H fields emitted by commercially available RFID readers. In our HF system we can expose drugs to at least five times the H field they produce at 20 cm from the reader. We can expose samples to 5 A/m in primary packaging or in special organ culture dishes with an outer concentric ring. The ring has inner and outer diameters of 32 mm and 55 mm, respectively. Computer monitoring of power, drug temperature, and air temperature can be performed continuously during exposure. Surrounding air temperature is monitored at all times while in our laboratory and while shipped to drug laboratories for analysis View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Read range performance comparison of compact reader antennas for a handheld UHF RFID reader [Supplement, Applications & Practice]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 24 - 31
    Cited by:  Papers (4)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3128 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • The International RFID Business Association [survey online]

    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 32
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1600 KB)  

    First Page of the Article
    View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Communications Magazine covers all areas of communications such as lightwave telecommunications, high-speed data communications, personal communications systems (PCS), ISDN, and more.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Osman Gebizlioglu
Huawei Technologies