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Micro & Nano Letters, IET

Issue 1 • Date March 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 5 of 5
  • Imaging of micro- and nano-structures with hard X-rays

    Page(s): 1 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (359 KB)  

    Imaging of micro- and nano-structures of opaque samples is demonstrated using hard X-rays. Two different methods are employed with an instrument recently built at the beamline 34 ID-C at the Advanced Photon Source. In-line phase contrast micro-imaging has been performed with highly coherent radiation. For the characterisation of structures as small as 50 nm, a hard X-ray microscope has been built. These complementary techniques cover a large range of length-scales View full abstract»

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  • Bonding of silicon with filled and unfilled polymers based on black silicon

    Page(s): 6 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (290 KB)  

    A bonding method for silicon wafers with unfilled and filled polymer components using `Black Silicon' is presented. The working principle is an interconnection of `Black Silicon' surfaces with ductile materials. Needles of nanostructured `Black Silicon' with their increased surface and undercut features penetrate the polymer when applying pressure. Plastic deformations of the polymer lead to a permanent bond. The retention force exceeds 1000 N/cm2 as experiments with polypropylene and low temperature co-fired ceramic tapes (polymer filled with ceramic) show. The application areas are smart packaging, fluidic interconnects for microsystems, electronic assembly and hybrid polymer-ceramic silicon systems View full abstract»

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  • High speed nano-scale positioning using a piezoelectric tube actuator with active shunt control

    Page(s): 9 - 12
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (282 KB)  

    Piezoelectric tube scanners are the actuators of choice in scanning probe microscopy. These nanopositioners exhibit a dominant first resonant mode that is excited due to harmonics of the input scan signal. This introduces errors in the scan obtained. The presence of this resonant mode limits the upper bound of a triangular scan rate to around 1/100th of the first mechanical resonance frequency. Passive and active shunts have shown to damp this resonant mode substantially and improve scan performance. Sensorless active shunts optimised using H2 and Hinfin techniques, is designed. These shunts reduce the amplitude of the first resonant peak of a prototype tube nanopositioner by 24 dB. A triangle wave input is used to test the improvement in scan performance due to the damping achieved by these active shunts. Analysis shows that damping the resonant mode in such fashion reduces the scan error by five times View full abstract»

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  • Multipurpose nanomechanical testing machines revealing the size-dependent strength and high ductility of pure aluminium submicron films

    Page(s): 13 - 16
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (321 KB)  

    The mechanical properties measurement of materials with submicron dimensions is extremely challenging, from the preparation and manipulation of specimens, to the application of small loads and extraction of accurate stresses and strains. A novel, versatile concept of micro and nano-machines to test films or beams with characteristic dimensions ranging between 10 and 1000 nm, allowing multiple loading configurations and geometries, is described. This new nanotesting method has been applied to thin, pure aluminium films. The yield strength linearly increases with the inverse of the film thickness, reaching 625 MPa for 150 nm thickness which is ten times larger than for macroscopic samples. The strain hardening rate is large, similar to what is measured with macroscopic specimens. Unexpectedly, large strains equal to about 75% have been measured before the initiation of a stable ductile failure mode. This nanomechanical laboratory involves thousands of micromachines built onto a single silicon wafer, providing a unique platform for investigating the elementary mechanisms of deformation and fracture in nanoscale metal, polymer or ceramic samples View full abstract»

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  • Preparation and characterisation of nanosized antimony-doped tin dioxide powders with a novel post-treatment process

    Page(s): 17 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (217 KB)  

    Nanosized antimony-doped tin dioxide (ATO) was prepared by wet chemical method using SnCl4 and SbCl3 as raw materials. Effects of post-treatment method of precursor on particle characterisation were studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, granulometry measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A novel post-treatment process with polyacrylamide (PAM) in preparing nanomaterials was presented for the first time. Experimental results show that nonionic PAM is a highly effective additive, which not only speeds up the filtration of precursor, but also effectively reduces the formation of hard agglomerates. The average size of ATO nanopowders prepared, using nonionic PAM as a filtration aid and disperser, is smaller than 8 nm and its resistance rate is about 0.135 Omega cm View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

Micro & Nano Letters offers express publication of short research papers presenting research conducted at the forefront of micro- and nanoscale science, engineering and technology, with at least one dimension ranging from a few tens of micrometres to a few nanometres.

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Meet Our Editors

Editors-in-Chief
Professor Gwo-Bin Vincent Lee
National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan

Professor Peter Dobson
University of Oxford, UK