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Display Technology, Journal of

Issue 1 • Date March 2007

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Displaying Results 1 - 18 of 18
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): C1
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  • Journal of Display Technology publication information

    Page(s): C2
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  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 1
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  • Novel Color-Sequential Transflective Liquid Crystal Displays

    Page(s): 2 - 8
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1101 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A novel transflective liquid crystal display architecture and its system driving schemes are proposed. In the reflective mode, the ambient light is used to readout the displayed images. While in the transmissive mode, a color-sequential light emitting diode backlight is used to eliminate the color filters. Under such device configuration, several advantages such as increased brightness and maximized color saturation for both transmissive and reflective modes can be achieved View full abstract»

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  • Poincaré Sphere Method for Optimizing the Phase Modulation Response of a Twisted Nematic Liquid Crystal Display

    Page(s): 9 - 14
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (515 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We report an experimental procedure for achieving spatial modulation of the phase of an input wave field with an off-the-shelf twisted nematic liquid crystal display. This method involves illumination of an addressed liquid crystal display (LCD) with circularly polarized light and measurement of the Stokes parameters of the outgoing beam as the applied voltage is changed. The analysis of the distribution of the polarization states in the S1-S2 plane suggests a simple way to optimize the liquid crystal phase response by means of a properly oriented quarter wave-plate followed by an analyzer. Laboratory results for a commercial display are presented. A phase modulation depth of 240deg is obtained at 514 nm with a residual intensity variation which is lower than 4% View full abstract»

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  • Transflective In-Plane Switching Liquid Crystal Display

    Page(s): 15 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (853 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A single cell gap, single gamma curve, and low operating voltage transflective liquid crystal display (LCD) using an in-plane switching (IPS) cell is proposed. In the IPS cell, the pixilated transparent indium tin oxide electrodes are on the top substrate and the reflectors are on the bottom substrate. The electro-optic properties of the transflective IPS LCD are calculated using three-dimensional simulation software. By optimizing the reflector width, the voltage-dependent transmittance and reflectance curves can be matched View full abstract»

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  • A High-Speed Measurement Method for Reflective Liquid Crystal Cells Using a Liquid Crystal Polarization-Converting Device

    Page(s): 22 - 28
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (3844 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    We propose a novel measurement method for determining cell parameters, such as a cell thickness and twist angle in reflective liquid crystal (LC) cells, by using a unique polarization-converting device prepared with a circularly and homogeneously aligned LC (CH-LC) cell. The light intensity distributions from the reflective LC cell transmitted twice through the CH-LC cell are measured by a charge-coupled device array camera. Cell thickness can be derived by using coordinate values of local minimum spot in the spatial light intensity distribution measured at one wavelength, where the pretilt angle is assumed to be the designed value. Both cell thickness and twist angle can also be determined by two local minimum positions of the light intensity at two different wavelengths and the effects of a quarter-wave plate are discussed View full abstract»

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  • High-Performance Active Liquid Crystalline Shutters for Stereo Computer Graphics and Other 3-D Technologies

    Page(s): 29 - 35
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (503 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Stereoscopic computer displays create a 3-D image by alternating two separate images for each of the viewer's eyes. Field-sequential viewing systems supply each eye with the appropriate image by blocking the wrong image for the wrong eye. In our work, we have developed a new mode of operation of a liquid crystal shutter that provides for highly effective blockage of undesired images when the screen is viewed in all viewing directions and eliminates color shifts associated with long turn-off times. The goal was achieved by using a pi-cell filled with low-rotational-viscosity and high-birefringence fluid and additional negative birefringence films with splay optic axis distribution. The shutter demonstrates a contrast ratio higher than 800:1 for head-on viewing and 10:1 in the viewing cone of about 45deg. The relaxation time of the shutter does not exceed 2 ms and is the same for all three primary colors View full abstract»

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  • AMOLED Pixel Circuit With Electronic Compensation of Luminance Degradation

    Page(s): 36 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (410 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    A new voltage-programmed pixel circuit using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistors (TFTs) for active-matrix organic light-emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) is presented. In addition to compensating for the shift in threshold voltage of TFTs, the circuit is capable of compensating for OLED luminance degradation by employing the shift in OLED voltage as a feedback of OLED degradation View full abstract»

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  • Polarity Balanced Driving Scheme to Suppress the Degradation of Vth in a-Si:H TFT Due to the Positive Gate Bias Stress for AMOLED

    Page(s): 40 - 44
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (763 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we propose a new amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin-film transistor (TFT) pixel circuit employing negative bias annealing for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED). This circuit consists of two driving TFTs, four switching TFTs, and two storage capacitors. The new driving scheme adopting negative bias annealing entitled polarity balanced driving (PBD) successfully suppresses the troublesome Vth shift in a-Si:H TFT. The proposed pixel circuit was verified by simulation and fabrication. When a severe electrical bias is applied more than 24 hours and a temperature is increased up to 60 degC rather than a room temperature, the current stability (Iafter_stress/Imax) of the proposed PBD pixel is 0.97 while that of the conventional one is 0.72. Our experimental results show that the proposed PBD can improve a stability of a-Si:H TFT because the applied negative gate bias can successfully suppress Vth shift of the current-driving a-Si:H TFT View full abstract»

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  • Improved Performance of F-Ions-Implanted Poly-Si Thin-Film Transistors Using Solid Phase Crystallization and Excimer Laser Crystallization

    Page(s): 45 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1484 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (Poly-Si TFTs) with F-ions-implantation were investigated in this study. The electrical characteristics and reliability of the F-ions-implanted poly-Si TFTs were reported for solid phase crystallization (SPC) and excimer laser crystallization (ELC) methods respectively. The thermal annealing causes F-ions to pile up at the poly-Si interface, without the initial pad oxide deposition. With the introduction of fluorine in poly-Si film, the trap state density was effectively reduced. Also, the presence of strong Si-F bonds enhances electrical endurance against hot carrier impact by using F-ions-implantation. These improvements in electrical characteristics are even obvious for the ELC poly-Si TFTs compared to the SPC ones View full abstract»

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  • Transient Behavior of the {\hbox {a}}{\hbox {-}}{\hbox {Si}}:{\hbox {H/Si}}_{3}{\hbox {N}}_{4} MIS Capacitor and Its Impact on Image Quality of AMLCDs Addressed by a-Si:H Thin-Film Transistors

    Page(s): 52 - 56
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1289 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Transient behavior of the a-Si:H/Si3N4 metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitor and its relationship to the performance of a-Si:H based active-matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs) have been analyzed in detail. A relatively slow voltage decay whose time constant is comparable to the frame period of the LCD is observed after applying a voltage pulse that drives the MIS capacitor into the electron accumulation. The voltage decay is due to electron emission from the localized states at the a-Si:H/Si3N4 interface. It is also found that this voltage transient results in a shift in the optimum common voltage for the liquid crystal pixel by changing the temperature and light exposure when an MIS-type capacitor is inserted between the pixel electrode and the adjacent gate bus-line as the storage capacitor. This shift in the optimum common voltage affects the image quality of AMLCDs through image sticking or flicker. A similar effect can occur even without an MIS-type storage capacitor in high resolution AMLCDs, where the gate-source parasitic capacitance of the thin-film transistor is comparable to the net capacitance of the pixel. It is important to take such transient effects of MIS capacitors into consideration in pixel designing View full abstract»

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  • Integrated a-Si:H Source Drivers for 4 ′′ QVGA Electrophoretic Display on Flexible Stainless Steel Substrate

    Page(s): 57 - 63
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1489 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Integrated source drivers for a 4'' Quarter Video Graphics Array (QVGA) electrophoretic display have been developed using amorphous silicon TFTs on flexible stainless steel substrate. The current design reduces the number of column interconnects to the display by more than 3times compared to a display with external drivers. This integration reduces cost and improves reliability View full abstract»

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  • Free View 3-D Visualization of Occluded Objects by Using Computational Synthetic Aperture Integral Imaging

    Page(s): 64 - 70
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (2024 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    In this paper, we present computational methods for reconstructing a free view of a partially occluded object using integral imaging. To obtain unobstructed images with high resolution, low focus error, and large depth of focus, synthetic aperture integral imaging utilizing a digital camera has been adopted. Two novel algorithms are proposed: 1) an algorithm for reconstructing volumetric perspective images and 2) an algorithm for scaling reconstructed images at arbitrary distances View full abstract»

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  • Design Considerations Between Color Gamut and Brightness for Multi-Primary Color Displays

    Page(s): 71 - 82
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1954 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Color displays show a vivid colorful image by combination of three or above primary colors on every individual pixel. Brightness of color displays, however, strongly restricts the color gamut of displays. From the color mixing theory, the area of color gamut on the color coordination would shrink smaller when brightness grows up. At the maximal brightness, displays can show one system white point only. The difficulties how to obtain the maximal brightness under an assigned color point or color gamut have been a key issue for display manufacturers. The paper proposes a theory to analyze the relation between brightness and color gamut based on the multi-primary color display. Simulations estimate the boundary of color gamut of multi-primary color displays under required brightness which had been proved by experimental results of tri-primary color display. The theory can be applied on the color temperature (CT) design which experimental results show the fact that a display apparatus with higher color temperature could sacrifice brightness less compared to one with lower color temperature when color temperature of the display image needs to change. The theory provides a design guideline for optimization between color gamut, color temperature and brightness on multi-primary color displays View full abstract»

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  • Reducing Binocular Rivalry in the Use of Monocular Head-Mounted Display

    Page(s): 83 - 88
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1023 KB) |  | HTML iconHTML  

    Monocular head-mounted displays (HMDs) can be used with wearable computers. However, such displays can cause binocular rivalry, a phenomenon in which the left and right images alternate, and is unstable. Binocular rivalry, when using HMD, causes the image of the environment to alternate with the HMD image, or even the total loss of perception of the image from the HMD. Binocular rivalry can occur with displays of any resolution. In this study, we used optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) to reduce binocular rivalry. A special stimulus synchronized to the occurrence of binocular rivalry was used to trigger OKN. The subject was asked to observe a visual stimulus and press a trigger button whenever binocular rivalry occurred. This initiated the presentation of a specific spatial frequency stimulus that broke up the rivalry. Electro-oculogram (EOG) electrodes recorded the observer's possible loss of perception of the HMD image, helping to confirm the occurrence of binocular rivalry. Sixteen subjects participated in the experiments. The results indicate that synchronizing special stimuli to the viewers' responses in order to induce OKN can reduce binocular rivalry View full abstract»

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  • Journal of Display Technology Information for authors

    Page(s): C3
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Blank page [back cover]

    Page(s): C4
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Aims & Scope

This publication covers the theory, design, fabrication, manufacturing and application of information displays and aspects of display technology.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Arokia Nathan
University of Cambridge
Cambridge, U.K.