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Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sep 1992

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Displaying Results 1 - 8 of 8
  • Multiple drafts and legal liability: a hazard for professional writers

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 138 - 142
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (540 KB)  

    The overall legal significance of multiple drafts of professional communications is discussed. In particular, some of the legal principles that govern the status of written documents, such as the applicable rules of court are reviewed, and the types of litigation in which previous drafts can figure prominently are examined. The possibility of multiple draft liability in light of the current emphasis on writing as a process, with writers encouraged to turn off the editorial sides of their brains during the early stages of composing, is considered View full abstract»

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  • STOP, GO, and the state of the art in proposal writing

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 143 - 155
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1344 KB)  

    It is shown that the state of the art in proposal preparation makes available a wide array of techniques and devices to help make the proposal compliant, clear, convincing, and appealing. The techniques discussed are modular format, topical outlining, topic thesis sentences, required figures for topics, graphics oriented (GO) charts, figure enrichment, expanded figure titles, phrased topic titles, action topic titles, key issues visuals and lead topics, topic level storyboards, group wall review of storyboards, proposal manager's win strategy worksheets and customer's requirements worksheets, section level win strategy worksheets, compliance control system and worksheets, and early red team reviewing. In particular, the Sequential Topical Organization of Proposals (STOP) system, which introduced the modular format and topical storyboarding, is described View full abstract»

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  • International students and awareness of digital scanning issues

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 172 - 175
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (380 KB)  

    The legal and ethical issues raised by the ability to use desktop scanners to convert images into digital data for manipulation, enhancement, and eventual incorporation into a publication are discussed. Potential legal problems involve copyright infringement and libel, both of which are familiar concerns to technical writers, although they tend to be associated with text rather than graphic images. Ethical issues raised by the available technology include concerns about enhanced advertisements. To maintain public confidence in digitally processed images, technical communicators in academia must provide guidelines for their students, both US and international, who will encounter many of these legal and ethical issues in the workplace View full abstract»

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  • What difference does inherited difference make? Exploring culture and gender in scientific and technical professions

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 183 - 190
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (784 KB)  

    A course design and the material for implementing a course in which students explore the status of women and minorities in the scientific and technical professions and the possible reasons for that status are presented. The course is offered as a model for the integration of intercultural and gender issues into the technical communication classroom. Since cultural and gender issues are neither scientific nor technological but humanities issues, core readings for the course are humanities texts. By working in teams of culturally and gender-diverse colleagues, students explore the intercultural concerns and gender issues in the field of technical communication. Students conduct personal interviews, study published reports, obtain policy statements and current statistics, analyze data, draw conclusions, and submit a comprehensive technical report to audiences who might act on those findings, such as the National Science foundation View full abstract»

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  • Engineering style: striving for efficiency

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 130 - 137
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (756 KB)  

    Strategies for improving stylistic efficiency of technical writing are presented. The strategies, in contrast to the myriad of advice on how to improve sentence style, create sentence flow and give the prose a character that propels readers along. Improvements in stylistic efficiency come from aligning word order with readers' expectations so as to restrict the reader's interpretive latitude View full abstract»

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  • People, proxemics, and possibilities for technical writing

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 176 - 182
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    It is argued that, because markets are becoming increasingly global, international readers who are familiar with English and comfortable with the standard ratio of equal parts of white space and text must be distinguished from domestic readers whose international exposure may be limited and whose requirements can be better addressed by creating a document which conforms to their cultural perceptions of space. Anthropologists have shown that perceptions about space and man's relationship to it vary from culture to culture and consequently it is dangerous to make assumptions about a local audience based on experience with international audiences. Edward Hall's work on proxemics (1969), the perceptions concerning spatial relationships, and examples of technical document designs in England, Japan, and the Middle East are discussed View full abstract»

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  • A discourse analysis of software documentation: implications for the profession

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 156 - 167
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1112 KB)  

    To discover the similarities and differences between primary and secondary computer manuals, and to account for the popularity of the secondary texts, two best-selling books for word processing and spreadsheet programs are compared to documentation supplied by the manufacturer. A heuristic for analyzing software documentation based on cognitive and rhetorical principles is developed and applied to the corporate documentation for (WordPerfect 5.0) in contrast to Stewart's Using WordPerfect 5 from Que, and the corporate documentation from `Lotus 1-2-3' in contrast to Gilbert and Williams's `The ABC's of 1-2-3 from Sybex.' It is shown that the trade texts from Que and Sybex contain more conceptual background information than the corporate documentation and differ in their rhetorical stance: the writers provide a richer context by giving more examples for applying the software; the writers provide global and structural frameworks; the writers use persuasive marketing techniques to ease the reader's anxieties and remind them of the software's benefits; and the writers identify themselves View full abstract»

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  • Cultural reentry shock: using the professional writing class to help foreign students

    Publication Year: 1992 , Page(s): 169 - 171
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    It is argued that foreign students, who spend four or more years studying at US universities, often do not realize how much their years in America have changed them. Nor do they realize that these changes will have a profound effect on them when they return to their native cultures. The difficulty they will have upon returning to their home countries has been called cultural reentry shock. The professional writing classroom seems a good place for educators to make foreign students aware of cultural reentry shock. Teachers can define the various problems associate with this phenomenon, lead students in discussion of the problems, and propose ways to ease the severity of the problems. Writing assignments may be structured in such a way as to allow students to do self analysis of the changes they may have undergone during their years in the US. The students can be encouraged to design their technical documents using their native environments as the source of data, examples, and issues to write about. These documents can also be written for an audience in the native culture, rather than to an American audience View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication is a peer-reviewed journal devoted to applied research on professional communication--including but not limited to technical and business communication. It has been published since 1957 by the Professional Communication Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Saul Carliner
Concordia University