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Systems Science and Cybernetics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date July 1970

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Displaying Results 1 - 21 of 21
  • [Table of contents]

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Systems Science and Cybernetics Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 161
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  • A Simulation for a Short Takeoff and Landing System Traffic Analysis

    Page(s): 162 - 172
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    A model has been developed to simulate an urban short takeoff and landing (STOL) system. It was designed as a tool for the evaluation of flight hardware and also to provide insight into the specialized nature of an urban transportation system such as the one envisioned for the Northeast Corridor. The actions of aircraft are treated in the high level of detail characteristic of an urban shuttle system with its constraints and limitations. Considerations included: 1) variable passenger demands, 2) dispatching decisions, 3) takeoff and airspace regulations, 4) variations in interfering aircraft traffic, and 5) off-corridor services. The implementation allows for simulation and analysis of aircraft and passenger movements and the consequent interactions. Output is generated in terms of the realistic and useful figures of cost, revenue, and systems performance needed to evaluate each phase of the STOL operation. The model was written in the general purpose simulation system language. View full abstract»

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  • Pattern Recognition Approach to Medical Diagnosis

    Page(s): 173 - 178
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    A sequential method of pattern recognition was used to recognize hyperthyroidism in a sample of 2208 patients being treated at the Straub Clinic in Honolulu, Hawaii. For this, the method of class featuring information compression (CLAFIC) [1] was used, introducing some significant improvements in computer medical diagnosis, which by its very nature is a pattern recognition problem. A unique subspace characterizes each class at every decision stage, and the most prominent class features are selected. Thus the symptoms which best distinguish hyperthyroidism are extracted at every step and the number of tests required to reach a diagnosis is reduced. View full abstract»

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  • The Nearest Neighbor Classification Rule with a Reject Option

    Page(s): 179 - 185
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    An observation comes from one of two possible classes. If all the statistics of the problem are known, Bayes' classification scheme yields the minimum probability of error. If, instead, the statistics are not known and one is given only a labeled training set, it is known that the nearest neighbor rule has an asymptotic error no greater than twice that of Bayes' rule. Here the (k,k¿) nearest neighbor rule with a reject option is examined. This rule looks at the k nearest neighbors and rejects if less than k¿ of these are from the same class; if k¿ or more are from one class, a decision is made in favor of that class. The error rate of such a rule is bounded in terms of the Bayes' error rate. View full abstract»

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  • Self-Organizing Approach to the Stochastic Fuel Regulator Problem

    Page(s): 186 - 191
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    A self-organizing procedure to achieve a performance adaptive controller with asymptotically optimal properties is proposed for systems with completely or partially unknown dynamics. A physically realizable controller that operates in an unknown stochastic environment is obtained. The accrued cost during a global random search for the minimum converges to the minimum value corresponding to the specific optimal controller. The global search strategy includes a subgoal defined on a nondecreasing time subinterval and an algorithm of adaptive random type. The stochastic fuel regulator problem with random switching delay is used as an application of the method and simulation results demonstrate its effectiveness. View full abstract»

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  • Natural Bilinear Control Processes

    Page(s): 192 - 197
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    A nonlinear class of models for biological and physical processes is surveyed. It is shown that these so-called bilinear systems have a variable dynamical structure that makes them quite controllable. While control systems are classically designed so there are no unstable modes, bilinear systems may utilize appropriately controlled unstable modes of response to enhance controllability. View full abstract»

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  • A Parallel Optimum Seeking Technique-Dynostat

    Page(s): 197 - 208
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    Dynostat is the name given to a system optimization technique employing both instantaneous and predictive optimum seeking strategies in parallel. Although it has both off-line and on-line capabilities of application this account is concerned mainly with an explanation of the essentials of the technique in the context of off-line optimization studies. A brief description of a successful application study of a practical problem in industry is also included. The technique is explained in a progressive manner by considering an example for which there is a requirement for an optimum schedule of alternative energy sources. As is well known, optimum scheduling using the dynamic programming technique is restricted in practice by limitations in computer storage and computing time to systems with few independent variables. However, in certain classes of multichannel systems some of these variables appear naturally, or by reasonable approximation can be made to appear, in a static section of the system, and it is shown that optimizing their values need consume only little computer time and storage. The remainder of the variables are in the dynamic section and their optimization makes a heavy demand on computational facilities. The Dynostat technique handles both types of variables in a single computer algorithm. An indication of a projected on-line configuration of Dynostat is presented in a statement of developments of the technique currently under study. View full abstract»

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  • Adaptive Global Search in a Time-Variant Environment Using a Probabilistic Automaton with Pattern Recognition Supervision

    Page(s): 209 - 217
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    A probabilistic automaton with pattern recognition supervision is considered as an on-line real-time adaptive controller for a complex plant with a multimodal performance-index structure and subjected to an environment which randomly fluctuates in time. This environment is considered to be partially measurable but entirely uncontrollable. The automaton discussed is capable not only of learning the optimum control parameters in any given environmental situation but also of acting as an internal teacher in the formation of pattern associations between the measurable state of the environment and the control situation, so that approximately recurrent conditions can be taken advantage of in future relearning situations. These pattern associations, once developed, are used to supervise the future action of the automaton. Furthermore, the pattern associations between the measurable state of the environment and the control situation must themselves be adaptively formed to allow for variations caused by unknown and/or unmeasurable factors in the total environment. View full abstract»

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  • University Programs in Systems Engineering

    Page(s): 217 - 228
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    A survey of university programs in systems engineering is presented. Only institutions having formally organized programs leading to degrees or options in systems engineering, systems science, cybernetics, or related fields are included. A list of institutions includes a statement of the history and position of the program at the institution. Eighteen categories of subject matter offered in these programs are proposed and the classification of typical course titles into the categories is exemplified. A subject matter profile is established for each program by reporting the number of courses that fall within each of the eighteen categories. View full abstract»

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  • The Sum-Line Extrapolative Algorithm and Its Application to Statistical Classification Problems

    Page(s): 229 - 239
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    The sum-line algorithm (SLA) for use with an adaptive linear threshold element is shown experimentally to have excellent extrapolative properties when applied to two-class multivariate Gaussian pattern-classification problems, even when the number of sample patterns is severely limited. The algorithm iteratively adapts the desired analog-output sum of the threshold element while simultaneously adapting the weights of the element. The algorithm converges toward a solution weight vector. It is shown experimentally that this vector tends toward the solution provided by the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm or that provided by the matched-filter (MF) algorithm, whichever is best able to extrapolate from a given set of sample patterns to patterns that are derived from the same statistical populations but are not included in the sample set. View full abstract»

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  • Computational Experience with the Davidon Method Applied to Optimal Control Problems

    Page(s): 240 - 242
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    The Davidon method as extended by Tripathi and Narendra [1], [2] is applied to optimal control problems with terminal state constraints adjoined to the cost functional as penalty functions. The results of two numerical examples indicate that this algorithm provides an attractive alternative to conjugate gradient algorithms. View full abstract»

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  • Optimum Allocation of Personal Presence

    Page(s): 242 - 244
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    A person may give his attention directly by transporting himself from place to place, or vicariously by communicating over a wire with the object of his attention. A procedure is presented for combined allocation of these two kinds of personal presence. Allocation of a physician's time to direct diagnosis versus telediagnosis is an example. View full abstract»

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  • Decoupled Method for Approximation of Signals by Exponentials

    Page(s): 244 - 246
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    This noniterative method for approximating empirical signals over [O, ¿) by a linear combination of exponentials yields suboptimal approximation. Notably, the dependence of the suboptimal exponents ¿i¿ on the fractional integral square error ¿ is such that lim¿¿0 ¿i = ¿i, the optimal exponents. The integral square error in representation is studied for a sin and a square pulse, and a useful error formula is developed. View full abstract»

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  • A Recognition Algorithm for Handprinted Arabic Numerals

    Page(s): 246 - 250
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    A recognition algorithm for handprinted Arabic numerals is proposed. The algorithm is applied to a set of test samples and the test results are presented. View full abstract»

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  • Proposed New Unit: Pitts

    Page(s): 250
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    First Page of the Article
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  • Book Reviews

    Page(s): 251 - 253
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 254 - 255
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 255c
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