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Man-Machine Systems, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1970

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  • [Table of contents]

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Man-Machine Systems Group

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): c2
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  • Investigation of Motion Requirements in Compensatory Control Tasks

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 123 - 125
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Tests consisting of one- and two-axis closed-loop tracking tasks, with and without motion, have been made to define some areas where motion cues are beneficial. Tests were made with reduced scaling on the motion input to investigate the minimum requirements of motion cues in those tests where motion was found to be of assistance. For the set of conditions tested, little or no difference in the measurement criteria was observed in the single-axis motion/no motion runs. Similar results were obtained when comparing two single-axis tests with different pitch orientation. The two-axis tests, which consisted of pitch and yaw and pitch and roll, did, however, produce a difference in the error measurements in the motion/no motion comparison. A decrease in normalized tracking error and an increase in closed-loop system frequency were observed when motion was added. Tests were also run, in pitch and yaw only, in which the scale of the motion input was reduced. These tests were performed by the subject in sequence starting with no motion all the way to full motion and back down to no motion. Each motion scale condition (none, 1/16, ¿, ¿, ¿, and full) constituted a test. The normalized tracking error remained constant for full, ¿, and ¿ motion scaling, but increased with a further reduction in motion scaling. View full abstract»

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  • Models of Temporal Motor Responses - Stimulus, Movement, and Manipulation Information

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 126 - 128
    Cited by:  Papers (1)
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    Quantitative models of human motion are developed relating reaction time, movement time, and manipulation time to stimulus, movement, and manipulation information. Response surface methodology, a statistical design and modeling technique, was used. Linear models relating time to information seem appropriate, and no significant interactions were uncovered. View full abstract»

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  • Rotation of Visual Reference Systems and Its Influence on Control Quality

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 129 - 131
    Cited by:  Papers (2)
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    Electronic displays pose large human-engineering possibilities and, at the same time, new problems. One special aspect is the rotation of the display reference system. The human operator is unable to compensate for rotation. This is why tracking errors increase considerably at 90 and 270° rotation angles. Related experiments are described in detail. A new "action display" indicating the stick signal to the control system compensates completely for the rotation effect. View full abstract»

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  • Human Factors Evaluation of Several Cursor Forms for Use on Alphanumeric CRT Displays

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 132 - 137
    Cited by:  Papers (5)
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    The results of an experiment to evaluate several cursor forms for use on alphanumeric CRT displays are presented. Cursor form and cursor blink rate were investigated in terms of their effects on operator search time in finding the cursor in a random location and their effects on tracking the cursor as it is moved between fixed random locations. Six cursor forms at five alternation rates were examined. The cursor forms were box, underline, cross, diamond, blinking, and wiggling cursors. Alternation rates were 0, 2, 3, 5, and 6 Hz. Based on results and additional criteria about the use of cathode-ray-tube displays, it was determined that, of the cursors examined, a box cursor around each graphic character blinking at 3 Hz is most effectively searched and tracked. Subjective evaluations support this finding. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 138
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  • Statement of Editorial Policy

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 138-a
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  • Information for authors

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 138a
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  • Institutional listings

    Publication Year: 1970 , Page(s): 138b
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