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Electrical Insulation, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date Sept. 1972

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Displaying Results 1 - 14 of 14
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Electrical Insulation Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 121
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  • Rapid Measuremnent of the Deterioration of Oil-Immersed Paper

    Page(s): 122 - 126
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    A rapid measurement of thermal deterioration of oil-immersed papers by mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph is described. A special assembly was developed using a mercury diffusion pump and automatic Topler pump to extract a very small quantity of generated gas from the oil and to collect it in a reservoir. The gas collected by the above assembly is analyzed by mass spectrometer and gas chromatograph. Logarithm of the generation rate of (CO + CO2) [log (CO + CO2)] is proportional to the reciprocal of absolute temperature (1/T). This linear relationship can be explained by chemical reaction-rate theory and it is shown that the thermal endurance and the thermal life of insulating papers in oil can be estimated by the generation rate of (CO + CO2) in a few weeks as was reported previously for air and vacuum. But the change of the slope of the line log (CO + CO2) versus 1/T at the temperature near 130°C was observed. This is a new mechanism of thermal deterioration of insulating paper in oil, which is apparently unexplained. View full abstract»

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  • Isothermal Differential Calorimetry as a Means to Measure Insulation Aging Rate down to the Operating Temperatures

    Page(s): 126 - 132
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    A new calorimetric method for measurements of insulation aging rate is introduced. The method is based on measurements of the heat flow caused by the heat absorbed or liberated in aging reaction. In isothermal conditions, this heat flow is proporticnal to the reaction rate. The instrument is sensitive enough for reactionrate measurements down to the service temperatures of materials. Using an appropriate gas circulation system, the tests can be performed in different atmospheres. In this way, the competing reactions in an aging process can be observed separately. Any type of solid material can be tested: solid block, film, powder, etc. Some test results on a few well-known insulating materials are described. A new procedure for aging tests, based on the use of isothermal differential calorimetry, is proposed. View full abstract»

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  • A New Insulation Experience in Large Rotating Machinery in Japan

    Page(s): 132 - 139
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    New synthetic resin insulation systems have been established in Japan, as in Europe and the United States [2], and have a history of almost fifteen years. The research work of authors, initiated in 1949, led to the completion of the unsaturated polyester insulation system called SLS insulation. Outstanding performance was obtained as of 1957 when this new insulation system was applied to large rotary-type machinery. In the meantime, a trial manufacture study was conducted on epoxy-resin insulation in view of its excellent electrical and mechanical properties. As a result, an epoxy insulating system of quality distinctly superior to the former system was successfully put on a mass-production basis. This paper describes the fundamental insulation procedure, the dielectric properties, and the service experience of this system. View full abstract»

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  • Determination of Highly Stressed Volumes in Oil Dielectrics

    Page(s): 139 - 144
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    The volume of oil under the highest stress has been shown to correlate well with the measured breakdown voltages of transformer oil in different electrode systems. The determination of the volume of oil that is most highly stressed in a given electrode system is not however an easy matter. It involves the location of equistress or equigradient surfaces followed by computation of the oil volume contained within the surfaces. This paper describes a differential probe and amplifier system, which has been developed to allow the direct plotting of equigradient lines on a conducting paper analog of any two-dimensional electrostatic field. View full abstract»

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  • Effect of Organic Additives, Gas Phase, Stress, and Temperature on the Gassing Characteristics of Insulating Liquids

    Page(s): 145 - 152
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    This paper describes the effects of adding small concentrations of organic additives (anthraquinone, benzophenone, and diphenyl) to transformer oil on its gassing characteristics under different gas phases (H2, N2, O2, and air), different stresses and different temperatures. The results show that there exists an optimum concentration for each of the additives used. The optimum concentrations were found to be independent of the gas phase used. Also, for a given test liquid the results indicate the presence of an optimum stress for both gas-evolving and gas-absorbing oils. The results obtained are explained in terms of the free radical mechanism for gassing of oils under electrical stress. View full abstract»

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  • The Aging Process in Electrical Insulation: A Tutorial Summary

    Page(s): 153 - 157
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    Calculating the life expectancy of electrical insulation is an interesting application of Arrhenius's law. Bussing's analytical treatment is derived for the simple case of life at constant temperature. Its extension to variable temperature conditions is explained as is the application of the same techniques to calculating mechanical failure due to creep and capacitor failure due to electrode diffusion. Lastly, recently developed techniques for rapid determination of the slopes of Arrhenius's-law graphs for insulation life are reviewed. View full abstract»

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  • Table of contents for 'Analysis of Accelerated Life Test Data'

    Page(s): 158 - 159
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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 159 - 160
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  • Editorial policies and criteria

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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 160b
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production in 1993. The current retitled publication is  IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation.

Full Aims & Scope