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Electrical Insulation, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date June 1972

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Displaying Results 1 - 11 of 11
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Electrical Insulation Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • Editorial

    Page(s): 57
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  • High-Density Conducting Mist Test for Insulator Evaluation

    Page(s): 58 - 63
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    A technique is described for rapid reproducible testing of contaminated outdoor insulators. The test parameters can be controlled to permit comparison of insulators under different conditions. Erosion and tracking resistance of polymeric insulators in functional designs can be studied by controlling the test parameters. A conductive mist is sprayed on the insulator while oscilloscope traces of the current wave are measured and examined. Test variables that can be controlled include voltage, spray volume, conductivity of the contaminant, and time. The insulator test features rapidity and reproducibility allowing the user to quickly compare new designs with conventional geometries. It is possible to vary the test parameters so as to represent a variety of environmental conditions that may exist in the field. The test method makes no attempt to simulate a specific environmental condition. Illustrative data are included for conventional porcelain-suspension insulators that are compared to results for a DuPont Teflon polytetrafluoroethylene rod and a quartz rod. View full abstract»

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  • Performance of Simple Insulator Shapes under Heavily Contaminated Conditions

    Page(s): 64 - 78
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    Flashover voltage, scintillation current, resistance of a number of simple insulator geometries (rods, disks, and cones) have been measured under contaminated conditions. Results have been compared with porcelain suspension insulators. Tests were made in a high-density conducting mist and correlated with the resistivity of the contaminant solution. With such tests it seems possible to optimize insulator geometries. Flashover voltage of about twice that for conventional 6-in-long porcelain suspension insulators has been demonstrated for small-diameter cones on rods. While maintaining the same clearance distance1 for an insulator design, the effectiveness (per unit length of additional creepage distance) decreases with an increase in creepage distance. This is especially true in the vertical orientation. An increase in insulator diameter decreases effectiveness. Small-diameter rods perform well. Current measurements and photographs of scintillation and partial flashovers provide insight into insulator performance. Scintillation and arcing currents may lead to tracking and erosion of plastic insulators. Optimized design can reduce such currents by as much as 20 times. View full abstract»

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  • Nanosecond Breakdown in Hexane

    Page(s): 78 - 83
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    The electrical breakdown of hexane was investigated using nanosecond duration high-voltage pulses. An attempt was made to experimentally isolate the formative time lag contributions of the two major breakdown mechanisms: electron avalanche and streamer processes. The electrode area was kept constant at 2.85 cm2 throughout the study, and time resolution was on the order of 0.5 ns. The gap spacing and the applied field were varied in a highly controlled manner. A series of breakdown events were studied for gap spacings ranging from 0.07 to 0.41 cm with selected constant field strengths from 0.8 to 1.6 MV/cm. The results obtained indicate that the streamer mechanism is the dominant process in the breakdown of hexane and the average velocity of propagation is on the order of 107 cm/s for the fields and gap spacings used in this study. View full abstract»

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  • Life Curves of Epoxy Resin under Impulses and the Breakdown Parameters

    Page(s): 84 - 99
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    Lives of pin-plane and sphere-plane configurations were investigated. The number of impulses required to produce breakdown depended on the applied stress, the specimen thickness and area, and the resin formulation. Theoretical models were constructed suggesting an avalanche or streamer type of breakdown destroying dielectric near the anode. Breakdown parameters were estimated. View full abstract»

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  • Analysis of Accelerated Life Test Data-Part III: Product Comparisons and Checks on the Validity of the Model and Data

    Page(s): 99 - 119
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    This is Part III of a three-part series presenting statistical methods for planning and analyzing temperature-accelerated life tests with the Arrhenius model when all test units are run to failure. These methods are presented so they can be profitably used by individuals with a limited statistical background. In Part I, the Arrhenius model is described and graphical methods for analysis of such data are given. In Part II, numerical methods for analysis of such data are given and optimum and standard test plans are presented and compared. In Part III, graphical and numerical methods for comparing different products are given and methods for assessing the validity of the data and the assumptions of the Arrhenius model also are given. These methods are illustrated throughout with accelerated life test data on insulation. While the methods are presented for the Arrhenius model, they can be used for planning and analyzing many other accelerated life test situations. View full abstract»

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  • Contributors

    Page(s): 119 - 120
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  • Editorial policies and criteria

    Page(s): 120-a
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  • Information for authors

    Page(s): 120b
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased production in 1993. The current retitled publication is  IEEE Transactions on Dielectrics and Electrical Insulation.

Full Aims & Scope