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Broadcast and Television Receivers, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 2 • Date May 1973

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Displaying Results 1 - 23 of 23
  • IEEE Transactions on Broadcast and Television Receivers

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Broadcast and Television Receivers Group

    Page(s): c2
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  • 1973-1975 IEEE Group on Broadcast and Television Receivers Administrative Committee

    Page(s): i
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  • GBTR Standing Committees and Members

    Page(s): ii
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  • Preliminary Minutes of the Administrative Committee Meeting Broadcast & Television Receivers Group

    Page(s): iii
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  • Tentative Program for 1973 Chicago Spring Conference

    Page(s): iv
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  • A Special Message to Our Readers

    Page(s): v
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): vi
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  • A Television Game Device

    Page(s): 75 - 78
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  • The Impact of Ion Implantation on Consumer Electronics

    Page(s): 99 - 105
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    The use of new processing techniques, coupled with innovative circuit design and packaging techniques, have resulted in lower-cost, higher-performance consumer integrated circuits. These devices have aided domestic entertainment electronics manufacturers in meetingthe challenges posed by low-cost, off-shore competition. Continued advancement of consumer products will depend upon further refinements in both processing and in design techniques. The technique of ion-implantation offers many potential benefits to the device as well as the equipment designer. These benefits include high-value, accurate-resistor values which can be fabricated with significantly reduced chip area, conventional MOS as well as CMOS capability, and compatible high quality varactors combined with dual gate MOS devices. Applications of the technology are apparent in today's products and in future products will only be limited by the ingenuity of designers themselves. View full abstract»

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  • Sound and Noise Level Measurements

    Page(s): 106 - 112
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    Due to the demands of the public, recent legislation has been enacted to curb noise emanations from a multitude of sources. This has caused concern in industry in two ways. "First, the various noise levels under which a product is manufactured must be maintained within the law to prevent hearing damage risk to production workers. Second, the noise level generated by the operation of a particular product must be within designated standards. In the latter case, the annoyance of the sound level output is generally more important than the hearing damage risk for consumer products because of their reduced emissions. View full abstract»

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  • Thermal Resistance of IC Packages

    Page(s): 113 - 116
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    Over the past few years, integrated circuit production has been dominated by the manufacture of digital circuits which typically operate at rather moderate power levels. For example, 5400 and 7400 series TTL circuits will dissipate approximately 150 mW. Recently, the use of linear circuits in consumer applications has been on the increase, and it is not unusual for such circuits to operate at power levels an order of magnitude higher than their digital counterparts. As an example, the Sprague Electric Company now offers the ULX-2277 dual audio amplifier which delivers 2 watts per channel of continuous power. Heretofore, power levels such as this were encountered only in power transistors packaged in metal cans. It was a relatively simple matter to measure thermal resistances of such packages by attaching a thermocouple to the base of the can, or to a mounting stud or heat sink, and using this reading as case temperature. The measurement would then be carried out according to some procedure, such as that outlined in MIL STD 883. View full abstract»

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  • An Improved Television Sound System

    Page(s): 117 - 122
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    The following paper describes a single die, integrated, monolithic, sound system. Total function includes 4.5mHz I. F. limiting and amplification, quadrature F.M. detection, external D.C. volume control, audio power and preamplification, plus an internal supply line voltage regulator. Substantial performance ance gains throughout were realized with improved circuit and device design techniques. View full abstract»

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  • Designing Reliablity into Solid-state Consumer Systems

    Page(s): 123 - 126
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    The increased demand for semiconductors in the consumer market place has accelerated the need for improved product reliability. This need has been well recognized by the manufacturer and consumer. Often the consumer quality and reliability demands are tougher than required for military products --understandably so, when you consider the staggering cost of rework on line rejects, the repair of field failures (especially when warranties are involved), and the possibility of a bad reputation. Even though the price competition within the semiconductor industry has intensified, the manufacturer has to meet this challenge with good designed-in reliability and rigid process control. In addition, if a plastic encapsulant is used, it needs to exhibit a reliability approaching that of hermetic devices. Ultimately, the consumer can add to his system reliability by understanding the physical and electrical limitations of semiconductors, and recognizing the definite reliability improvements that can be achieved by integrating circuitry whenever possible. View full abstract»

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  • Driver-Circuit Design Considerations for High=Voltage Linen-Scan Transistor

    Page(s): 127 - 135
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    Advances in technology have made available Silicon High Voltage Transistors for use in television line scan applications. The basic structure of such-devices is discussed comparing with conventional low voltage power devices showing the dominance of the high voltage devices collector region. It will be skhown how this large collector volume impacts on the common emitter characteristics, reducing gain, and the switching characteristics, due to the large amounts of collector stored charge. View full abstract»

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  • A New Chroma-Processing IC Using Sample-and-Hold Techiques

    Page(s): 136 - 141
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    This paper describes a monolithic integrated circuit for processing the chrominance signal in a color television receiver. In performing the functions of color subcarrier regeneration and chroma control, emphasis has been placed on utilizing all the information available in the signal so as to approach ulti-mate system performance capability, while at the same time substantially reducing the number of external components and adjustments. View full abstract»

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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 141a
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 141b
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 141c
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  • Editor's Message:

    Page(s): 141-d
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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 141e
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Aims & Scope

This Transactions ceased publication in 1974. The current retitled version is named IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics.

Full Aims & Scope