By Topic

Network, IEEE

Issue 5 • Date Sept. 1992

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 6 of 6
  • Traffic management for B-ISDN services

    Page(s): 10 - 19
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1034 KB)  

    A set of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) bearer service categories, differentiated in terms of quality of service (QOS), that will support the large spectrum of applications expected in broadband integrated services digital networks (B-ISDN) is defined. The evolution of applications and the traffic requirements in B-ISDN/ATM networks are described, and the evolution of network services to address these requirements is discussed. The definition of ATM bearer service categories necessary for the economical support of initial applications and evolution to future B-ISDN services is proposed. The elements of the ATM traffic management strategy to support these service categories are presented.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Congestion control for multimedia services

    Page(s): 20 - 26
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (766 KB)  

    The problem of congestion control in high-speed networks for multimedia traffic, such as voice and video, is considered. It is shown that the performance requirements of high-speed networks involve delay, delay-jitter, and packet loss. A framing congestion control strategy based on a packet admission policy at the edges of the network and on a service discipline called stop-and-go queuing at the switching nodes is described. This strategy provides bounded end-to-end delay and a small and controllable delay-jitter. The strategy is applicable to packet switching networks in general, including fixed cell length asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), as well as networks with variable-size packets.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • B-ISDN/ATM traffic and congestion control

    Page(s): 28 - 37
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1057 KB)  

    A traffic control architectural framework for broadband integrated services digital network asynchronous transfer mode (B-ISDN/ATM) is outlined. Network congestion control procedures are devised, complemented by specific end-terminal controls. The network congestion control system is partitioned into three domains: network-element internal, networkwide, and call-level controls. A selective discard mechanism based on traffic tagging and monitoring via both a rate enforcement module and a selective discard module is proposed, along with a set of preventive, protective-reactive, adaptive-reactive, and adaptive-reactive-supportive mechanisms. The need for a traffic descriptor, either statistical or operational, logically related to both call admission control and usage parameter control, is discussed.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Spacing cells protects and enhances utilization of ATM network links

    Page(s): 38 - 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1374 KB)  

    It is shown that peak cell rate policing can be combined with fast reservation protocols for achieving statistical multiplexing in asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks. A cell spacer-controller architecture which smooths out cell clusters according to the original period both at the user network interface (UNI) and at network node interface (NNI) is proposed. A performance evaluation of the spacer-controller is presented. The evaluation involves modeling the spacer-controller, dimensioning a virtual scheduling algorithm, and the impact on cell delay variation (CDV). It is shown that large CDVs may induce severe degradation in the accuracy of usage parameter control/network parameter control mechanisms.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Managing bandwidth in ATM networks with bursty traffic

    Page(s): 50 - 58
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (943 KB)  

    Three approaches to the bandwidth management problem that have been proposed and studied by various groups are reviewed to illustrate three distinctly different approaches and identify their strengths and weaknesses. Based on these approaches, a bandwidth management and congestion control scheme for asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) networks that supports both point-to-point and one-to-many multicast virtual circuits is proposed. It is shown that the method can handle fully heterogeneous traffic and can be effectively implemented. The algorithm for making virtual circuit acceptance decisions is straightforward and fast, and the hardware mechanisms needed to implement buffer allocation and traffic monitoring at the user-network interface have acceptable complexities. It is also shown, through numerical examples, that the approach can achieve reasonable link efficiencies even in the presence of very bursty traffic. No advance reservation required, simplifying the interface between the network and the user and avoiding an initial network round trip delay before data can be transmitted.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • What should be the goal for ATM

    Page(s): 60 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (842 KB)  

    Two key features of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) statistical multiplexing and continuous bit rate are analyzed. Both are claimed to provide the economic edge for ATM over other transmission and switching paradigms. It is argued that they have little chance to succeed in a high-speed environment, and even if they can be implemented, their benefits are hardly worth the complexity they add to the network. The trade-off of cell-granularity efficiency, in terms of bandwidth allocation, utilization, and billing, versus acceptable implementation complexity is discussed from the point of view of traffic management. A quantified-bandwidth channel and peak rate subscription are suggested as new goals for ATM.<> View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

Aims & Scope

IEEE Network covers topics which include: network protocols and architecture; protocol design and validation; communications software; network control, signaling and management; network implementation (LAN, MAN, WAN); and micro-to-host communications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Xuemin (Sherman) Shen, PhD
Engineering University of Waterloo