By Topic

Internet Computing, IEEE

Issue 1 • Date Jan.-Feb. 2007

Filter Results

Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 26
  • [Front cover]

    Page(s): c1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (797 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Ctia Wireless 2007

    Page(s): c2
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1735 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Calls for Papers

    Page(s): 1
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (29 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Table of contents

    Page(s): 2 - 3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (652 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Looking Forward, Looking Back [All Systems Go]

    Page(s): 4 - 5
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (146 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Internet Computing's 2007 Editorial Board Members

    Page(s): 6 - 7
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (819 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Special Thanks to IC's Reviewers

    Page(s): 8 - 9
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (44 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Letters to the Editor

    Page(s): 10
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (229 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IDNs: Straightforward Technical Problem or Machiavellian Nightmare?

    Page(s): 11 - 13
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (242 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • From the Newsstand

    Page(s): 14 - 17
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (248 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Guest Editors' Introduction: Autonomic Computing

    Page(s): 18 - 21
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (1328 KB)  

    Autonomic computing systems are self-monitoring, self-tuning, self-organizing, self-optimizing, self-healing, and self-protecting, and they can address quality of-service, failure-recovery, and security issues with minimal human intervention. View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Reinforcement Learning in Autonomic Computing: A Manifesto and Case Studies

    Page(s): 22 - 30
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (271 KB)  

    Reinforcement learning is a promising new approach for automatically developing effective policies for real-time self-management. RL can achieve superior performance to traditional methods, while requiring less built-in domain knowledge. Several case studies from real and simulated systems management applications demonstrate RL's promises and challenges. These studies show that standard online RL can learn effective policies in feasible training times. Moreover, a Hybrid RL approach can profit from any knowledge contained in an existing policy by training on the policy's observable behavior, without needing to interface directly to such knowledge View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Distributed Cooperative Control for Adaptive Performance Management

    Page(s): 31 - 39
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (333 KB)  

    The authors' distributed cooperative-control framework uses concepts from optimal control theory to adaptively manage the performance of computer clusters operating in dynamic and uncertain environments. Decomposing the overall performance-management problem into smaller subproblems that individual controllers solve cooperatively allows for the scalable control of large computing systems. The framework also adapts to controller failures and allows for the dynamic addition and removal of controllers during system operation. This article presents a case study showing how to manage the dynamic power consumed by a computer cluster processing a time-varying Web workload View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Achieving Self-Management via Utility Functions

    Page(s): 40 - 48
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (275 KB)  

    Self-management in accordance with high-level objectives that users can specify is a hallmark of autonomic computing systems. The authors advocate utility functions as a principled, practical, and general way of representing such objectives. In an effort to bring the promise of utility-based frameworks to the marketplace, they describe how they've implemented them in two commercial products so as to achieve efficient resource allocation in a prototype data center. They also address several challenges to commercialization stemming from the need to reconcile the two products' fundamentally different types of objectives View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • IEEE Computer Society Membership [advertisement]

    Page(s): 49
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (349 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • IEEE Computer Society Membership [advertisement]

    Page(s): 50 - 51
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (299 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Client-Based Spatial Browsing on the World Wide Web

    Page(s): 52 - 59
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (758 KB)  

    Being able to visualize both spatial and nonspatial data is becoming increasingly important to today's Internet users. Spatial data viewers and query tools can aid in visualization, but they should also let users access data instantly and with minimal effort. The authors explore new ways to allow visualization of data stored in a central server database on a simple client. They also consider usage scenarios in which transferring the whole database to the client for processing isn't feasible due to the amount of data on the server, insufficient computing power on the client, and a slow link between the two View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Analysis of Caching and Replication Strategies for Web Applications

    Page(s): 60 - 66
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (338 KB)  

    Developers often use replication and caching mechanisms to enhance Web application performance. The authors present a qualitative and quantitative analysis of state-of-the art replication and caching techniques used to host Web applications. Their analysis shows that selecting the best mechanism depends heavily on data workload and requires a careful review of the application's characteristics. They also propose a technique for Web practitioners to compare different mechanisms' performance on their own View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Open Pluggable Edge Services: An Architecture for Networked Content Services

    Page(s): 67 - 73
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (295 KB)  

    The IETF's open pluggable edge services (OPES) working group focuses on rule-based, in-line transformation services of data flows between two Internet endpoints, such as Web servers and Web clients. The group has developed an architectural framework to authorize, invoke, and trace such application-level services. The framework follows a one-party consent model, which requires that at least one of the application-layer endpoints explicitly authorize each service. OPES services must also be reversible by request of the application endpoints View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Workflow Planning on a Grid

    Page(s): 74 - 77
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (297 KB)  

    Workflows are used in scientific, engineering, industrial, legal, and business applications to process many kinds of data, such as genomes, supply chains, and mailing lists. Workflows that involve thousands to millions of files and up to terabytes of data are a challenge that grid computing is tackling. Another challenge is how to automate the specification of large workflows to avoid human error - AI planning techniques can help. In this paper, we sketch how we're addressing these problems with the prototype workflow planning system we're developing at the University of Arkansas View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Twelve Billion Bargaining Chips: The Web Side of the Net Neutrality Debate

    Page(s): 78 - 81
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (942 KB)  

    Net neutrality - the issue of whether ISPs should be allowed to give (or, more likely, sell) higher-performance access to content or services from certain providers - has been a hot Internet public policy issue in the US. Some network owners (such as Bell South and SBC) indicate that they'd like to charge large content providers (Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, eBay, Amazon, and so on) extra in order to reach potential customers. Web users have a unique set of interests at stake in this debate, but they also have unexploited bargaining chips - roughly 12 billion, to be exact (or however many Web pages exist at the moment). The real threats to the Web's vitality and its hundreds of millions of users have been largely overlooked in this debate, however, as the legislative debate has overemphasized the interests of larger content providers and network operators. As the author illustrates, today's Web users need a neutral, nondiscriminatory Internet as an open platform to support the Web's operation. The good news is that as it moves from a read-only medium, in which most users are merely information consumers, to a read-write medium in which users post pictures, write public blog entries, and link to each other's profiles, active users might have an opportunity to preserve the Internet's open, nondiscriminatory (neutral) operation on which they depend View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • REST Eye for the SOA Guy

    Page(s): 82 - 84
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (140 KB)  

    This paper discusses the representational state transfer (REST) and service-oriented architecture (SOA) debate. The author tries to explain REST from the viewpoint of someone steeped in SOA, with the intention of helping SOA people understand the value the REST camp so rightfully touts View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • From Here to There

    Page(s): 85 - 89
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (438 KB)  

    In a previous paper, the author described where he thought the Web would be headed over the next few years. He speculated that the trend seemed to be toward the semantic Web, although maybe not via the shortest path of directly deploying semantic Web technologies such as RDF and OWL. For this paper, he presents some concrete examples of technologies that support this prognosis. One key idea of the semantic Web is the Web of data, in which richly interconnected data collections appear alongside (and integrated with) the collections of hypertext documents. However, the Web supports linking, and with the various data languages available (often XML based), a Web of data without semantic Web technologies is entirely conceivable. In a sense, we already have such a thing, although the data are usually binary files such as images and audio files, which seriously limits linking potential. Without the ability to join pieces of information and work more on the level of knowledge representation, this naive Web of data offers little promise in itself. There is a possible shift under way, however, from the Web as (mostly) a document repository with generally limited granularity of addressability, to the Web as a generic, moderately interlinked data store (which includes documents as a subset of data types) View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • Possible Ontologies: How Reality Constrains the Development of Relevant Ontologies

    Page(s): 90 - 96
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | Click to expandQuick Abstract | PDF file iconPDF (301 KB)  

    For years, ontologies have been known in computer science as consensual models of domains of discourse, usually implemented as formal definitions of the relevant conceptual entities. Researchers have written much about the potential benefits of using them, and most of us regard ontologies as central building blocks of the semantic Web and other semantic systems. Unfortunately, the number and quality of actual, "non-toy" ontologies available on the Web today is remarkably low. This implies that the semantic Web community has yet to build practically useful ontologies for a lot of relevant domains in order to make the semantic Web a reality. Theoretically minded advocates often assume that the lack of ontologies is because the "stupid business people haven't realized ontologies' enormous benefits." As a liberal market economist, the author assumes that humans can generally figure out what's best for their well-being, at least in the long run, and that they act accordingly. In other words, the fact that people haven't yet created as many useful ontologies as the ontology research community would like might indicate either unresolved technical limitations or the existence of sound rationales for why individuals refrain from building them - or both. Indeed, several social and technical difficulties exist that put a brake on developing and eventually constrain the space of possible ontologies View full abstract»

    Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.
  • 2007 IEEE Internet Computing Editorial Calendar

    Page(s): c3
    Save to Project icon | Request Permissions | PDF file iconPDF (1427 KB)  
    Freely Available from IEEE

Aims & Scope

IEEE Internet Computing provides journal-quality evaluation and review of emerging and maturing Internet technologies and applications.

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
Michael Rabinovich
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Case Western Reserve University