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Consumer Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

Issue 3 • Date July 1979

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Displaying Results 1 - 25 of 36
  • IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics - Table of contents

    Page(s): c1
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  • IEEE Broadcast, Cable, and Consumer Electronics Society

    Page(s): c2
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • 1979-1981 IEEE Group on Consumer Electronics Administrative Committee

    Page(s): i
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Call for Papers

    Page(s): ii
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Are you Ready for the 80's?

    Page(s): iii - iv
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • Introduction

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  • Blank Page

    Page(s): 234
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    Freely Available from IEEE
  • An Introduction to Teletext and Viewdata with Comments on Compatibility

    Page(s): 235 - 245
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    This paper is written in two parts. Part I is intended to be an introduction to teletext and viewdata for readers, with limited exposure to these topics. Part I also serves as an introduction to the Special Issue of the IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics devoted to Consumer Text Display Systems. View full abstract»

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  • UK Teletext-Evolution and Potential

    Page(s): 246 - 250
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    The development of teletext started in the UK in the early 1970's after investigation into methods of broadcasting subtitles. It was clear that it would soon be economic to build, into every television receiver, LSI circuitry to decode and to display data transmitted during the blanking intervals of the broadcast television signal. Extensive research by the BBC, the IBA and members of BREMA* led to agreement on a unified UK standard for teletext in 1974 and, after a 2 year trial, to a full public teletext service starting in November 1976.1 ,2 The evolution of this UK standard was influenced by the fundamental requirements of a practical data broadcasting service: (1) the service should provide a comprehensive range of information attractively presented, (2) access time, the delay between the viewer selecting a page and the first reception of that page,should be acceptably small, (3) data transmission should be compatible with the normal distribution network, it should have as large a service area as the colour television signal, and should not interfere with normal reception of colour television programmes,3'4 (4) the display should be easily read, (5) transmission errors should have minimnum subjective effect, (6) receivers should be low cost, (7) future options both for transmission and reception should be considered. View full abstract»

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  • Prestel The World's First Public Viewdata Service

    Page(s): 251 - 255
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    It should be explained that the name Prestel* has been adopted by the British Post Office as the trade name for its development of viewdata. This paper describes both the conceptual and international aspects of viewdata as well as summarising specific details of the Prestel service now embarked upon in the United Kingdom. View full abstract»

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  • Videotex Services: Network and Terminal Alternatives

    Page(s): 269 - 278
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    Videotex has provisionally become the generic name for interactive systems offering visual information services using a suitably modified or augmented home TV set, telephone and/or data networks, and videotex service centres. This paper starts by briefly introducing the videotex system concept and service possibilities. Examples of existing systems are also given. The main body of the paper considers two areas where new technology has a key role in videotex: in the network of service centres and communications facilities, and in the terminals, both at the information provider's end and at the consumer's end.. The trade-offs between multiple-format databases, source coding, terminal complexity and compatibility are examined. The possible solutions to terminal design range from a single, rigid design to an arbitrary combination method. The paper proposes a Layered Capability Structure (LCS) which promotes an evolutionary approach to terminal design. View full abstract»

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  • Telesoftware: Home Computing via Broadcast Teletext

    Page(s): 279 - 287
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    Broadcast teletext, as operated by the broadcasting authoriities in the UK has been available as a public service since 1974. As well as being an efficient means of decoding and displaying textual data, it was soon realised that the standard teletext decoder already contained many of the components required for a home computer: it has a character-generator for visual- display; a page-store, and a very convenient numeric keypad for data-entry. With the addition of a few other components, the result is quite a powerful stand-alone computer right inside the TV set. By utilising the teletext system to broadcast programs for such a terminal, a user needs only to select the teletext pages containing a desired program; once this has been read in, it may be loaded and executed by the terminal microprocessor without the need for expensive-storage peripherals, telephone lines or special knowledge by the user. View full abstract»

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  • Teletext and Viewdata Systems and Their Possible Extension to Europe and USA

    Page(s): 288 - 294
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    In this paper it is proposed to explore the extension of the UK Viewdata and Teletext systems primarily into the USA but also to Europe. The paper is complementary to the paper by N. E. Tanton, BBC, entitled 'UK Teletext ├é┬┐Evolution and Potential'. In adapting and extending an existing system it is worth recognising the basic starting points. For the UK Teletext and Viewdata systems these can be summed up as follows: 1) decoder costs, 2) ease of use by the end user. View full abstract»

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  • Info-Text, Newspaper of the Future

    Page(s): 295 - 297
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  • Teletect Field Tests

    Page(s): 304 - 310
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    Teletext is a technology that has "arrived",, and is capable of providing the U.S. broadcast television audience with a wide variety of new services. CBS has therefore proposed a major test program to help determine appropriate technical standards. After obtaining a preliminary and informal opinion from the FCC that a request to conduct an over-the-air test of teletext systems would probably receive favorable action, CBS embarked on a program to test television System M (525-line, 60-field) versions of the British CEEFAX/ORACLE system, and the French ANTIOPE system. The proposed tests would be technical in nature and would not, for the present, consider the types of services that might be provided by a U.S. teletext system. View full abstract»

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  • System and Hardware Considerations of Home Terminals with Telephone Computer Access

    Page(s): 311 - 317
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    The ability of consumers to access computer- stored general information is much further advanced in the United Kingdom than in the United States. This is largely . a result of the strong promotion of the teletext1,2 and viewdata3,4 concepts by the British Broadcasting Corporation and British Post Office, respectively. These strong government programs have resulted in the establishment of transmission and display standards, first for teletext and later for viewdata. The earlier availability of teletext resulted in most viewdata systems being designed as add-on elements to the teletext system, placing a burden on systems made to provide only viewdata service. The British and French governments may require the incorporation of teletext capability in all TV receivers in a few years. View full abstract»

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  • Antiope LSI

    Page(s): 334 - 338
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    Achieving an attractive display quality, a comprehensive set of features, a large local storage capability and yet offer the potential for consumer applications has been the challenge faced when defining the ANTIOPE system structure and LSI partitioning. View full abstract»

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  • Teletext and Viewdata Costs as Applied to the U.S. Market

    Page(s): 339 - 344
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    The prime aim of the Teletext and Viewdata systems in the UK has been to create a significant new market in the home for digital systems based around the domestic colour tv set. To achieve a major penetration of the market, particular attention was taken in formulating the systems specification to achieve simplicity for user operation and minimum decoder costs. At the same time, considerable degrees of freedom have been retained for future evolution without making existing decoders obsolete. View full abstract»

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  • Teletext Signal Generation Equipment and Systems

    Page(s): 345 - 352
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    Various systems for utilising the spare time in the vertical blanking interval of a normal television waveform have been proposed as a means of transmitting additional information for engineering tests and for other purposes. Broadly speaking, none of these systems have been viable for home use because of the cost of decoding the information. The advent of large scale integrated circuits (LSI) has changed this situation. In 1972 broadcasting authorities in the United Kingdom proposed systems for transmitting information in diqitally coded forms during the vertical blanking period for display on the home t.v. receiver. Initially these systems had slightly different technical parameters but as the result of development activity involvinq the broadcasting authorities and various receiver manufacturers a unified system was evolved and has been used by both authorities since 1974 (Reference 1.) View full abstract»

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  • Teletext/Viewdata LSI

    Page(s): 353 - 358
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    Teletext and Viewdata are the generic names for two basically similar systems for displaying pages or frames of useful information on the screen of a domestic television set. View full abstract»

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  • An Integrated Serial to Parallel Converter for Teletext Application

    Page(s): 359 - 361
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    Teledata systems implemented as either television add-ons or new set features will require relatively complex integrated circuits. Consumer acceptance of these systems will be a sensitive function of their price. Thus, the various IC technologies must be evaluated with respect to achieving adequate performance at minimum cost. We have investigated the feasibility of N-channel MOS for teledata serial- to-parallel conversion. View full abstract»

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Aims & Scope

The primary purpose for publishing the Transactions of the Consumer Electronics Society is to present to the membership and the engineering community in general, papers on new technology oriented to Consumer Electronics.

 

Full Aims & Scope

Meet Our Editors

Editor-in-Chief
R. Simon Sherratt
School Director for Teaching and Learning, School of Systems Engineering
The University of Reading
Reading, Berkshire  RG6 6AY  RG6 6AY  U.K.
r.s.sherratt@reading.ac.uk; sherratt@ieee.org
Phone:+44 (0) 118 3788588
Fax:+44 (0) 118 3788583